Exhibitions

Live Matter

Exhibition by Rosetta S. Elkin
Live Matter_Exhibition by Rosetta S. Elkin

Exhibition by Rosetta S. Elkin, Assistant Professor, Landscape Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design

This exhibition is in the Johnson-Kulukundis Family Gallery of Byerly Hall at 8 Garden Street, Radcliffe Yard, Cambridge, MA 02138.

From May 5 to May 29, 2015, the exhibition will be open Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Saturdays from noon to 4 p.m.


Live Matter concerns itself with the ongoing measure of the natural world—how plant life has been described, muted, and labeled throughout botanical history—to reveal a new discourse that delights in an attitude of discovery, one that acknowledges the aliveness of plants. Visitors to the exhibition are invited to stand beneath the complex of a mature root system, gaining a rare vantage point from which to consider the normally concealed foundations of plant life. Live Matter offers a provocative new perspective on the living, breathing organisms that are all around us, yet seldom fully appreciated. 

Rosetta Sarah Elkin works at the intersection of practice, teaching, research, exhibitions, and writing, across scales and mediums. She is an assistant professor of landscape architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, where her teaching and research focus on innovative applications of ecological and vegetative technologies that highlight the role of plants, from innovative seed mechanics to bionetworks. Elkin’s work has been featured internationally, including installations at the Chelsea Fringe Festival, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, and the Jardins de Métis.

The exhibition is in partnership with the Arnold Arboretum

More information about Rosetta S. Elkin: www.rse-landscape.com


Installation of a new piece by Rosetta S. Elkin in the Johnson-Kulukundis Family Gallery at the Radcliffe Institute


Rosetta S. Elkin’s installation of the root system from the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University allows the visitor not only to know plants through the ambitions of scientific botany, but also to appreciate them as individuals—by their formations and transformations.

Click on thumbnails to see larger images.

Excavation of the root system from the Arnold Arboretum. Concept and design by Rosetta S. Elkin. Photo by Michelle A. FrancoExcavation of the root system from the Arnold Arboretum. Concept and design by Rosetta S. Elkin. Photo by Michelle A. FrancoInstalling Live Matter. Concept and design by Rosetta S. Elkin. Photo by Kevin GradyInstalling Live Matter. Concept and design by Rosetta S. Elkin. Photo by Kevin GradyInstalling Live Matter. Concept and design by Rosetta S. Elkin. Photo by Kevin GradyInstalling Live Matter. Concept and design by Rosetta S. Elkin. Photo by Kevin Grady
Installing Live Matter. Concept and design by Rosetta S. Elkin. Photo by Kevin GradyInstalling Live Matter. Concept and design by Rosetta S. Elkin. Photo by Kevin GradyLive Matter installation in the Johnson-Kulukundis Family Gallery. Concept and design by Rosetta S. Elkin. Photo by Kevin GradyLive Matter installation in the Johnson-Kulukundis Family Gallery. Concept and design by Rosetta S. Elkin. Photo by Kevin GradyA View of Live Matter. Concept and design by Rosetta S. Elkin. Photo by Kevin GradyA View of Live Matter. Concept and design by Rosetta S. Elkin. Photo by Kevin Grady