Harvard Honors Ginsburg for Gender-Equality Advocacy

The Boston Globe reports that Ruth Bader Ginsburg was honored at Harvard University for her work as a pioneer in gender equality.

Justices Get Out More, but Calendars Aren’t Open to Just Anyone

The New York Times features Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and her public interview before an audience of 1,300 people in an enormous tent in Radcliffe Yard at Harvard. It was by one count Justice Ginsburg’s 23rd public appearance in the Supreme Court’s current term, ranking her third among justices. 

Live Matter. Photo by Kevin GradyLive Matter. Photo by Kevin Grady

The Roots of Artistry

Rosetta Elkin's Live Matter, on display through May 29, transforms the ordinary into the extraordinary through a simple shift of perspective. Visitors to Racliffe's Johnson-Kulukundis Family Gallery will get a rare look at the complex and creative architecture of plant life typically hidden underground. 

From Susan B. Anthony to her fellow suffragist Caroline H. Dall in the just-completed volume four of "The History of Woman Suffrage," which is part of the Schlesinger Library's holdings.From Susan B. Anthony to her fellow suffragist Caroline H. Dall in the just-completed volume four of "The History of Woman Suffrage," which is part of the Schlesinger Library's holdings.

Another Role for Colleges: Archivist

The Boston Globe reports: Radcliffe Institute’s recent “University as Collector” conference was, in part, an object lesson. Scholars and archivists from across the university gathered to consider a tiny handful of the millions of artifacts and specimens in the school’s collections. 

Photo by Steve Petteway, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States.Photo by Steve Petteway, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States.

Recognized As a Force for Change

“We present the Radcliffe Medal to an individual who has been a powerful and impressive force for change, someone who takes risks and forges ahead. These are hallmarks of Radcliffe,” said Dean Cohen in announcing Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as the Radcliffe Medal recipient. 

Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

Does Artificial Intelligence Pose a Threat?

The Wall Street Journal assembled a panel of experts from industry, research, and policy-making to consider the dangers—if any—of artificial intelligence. Taking part in the discussion is Radcliffe Institute Fellow Francesca Rossi, a professor of computer science and president of the International Joint Conferences on Artificial Intelligence. 

"A Case for Curiosity," on view through next March in Harvard's Science Center 371, was curated by students in this semester's course USW30, "Tangible Things: Harvard Collections in World History." First offered in 2011, the course signals a fresh, deep interest at Harvard in using artifacts to teach the humanities. Historian and co-instructor Laurel Thatcher Ulrich (center) calls such artifacts "portals," colorful tunnels into a past traditionally accessible only through the close study of texts."A Case for Curiosity," on view through next March in Harvard's Science Center 371, was curated by students in this semester's course USW30, "Tangible Things: Harvard Collections in World History." First offered in 2011, the course signals a fresh, deep interest at Harvard in using artifacts to teach the humanities. Historian and co-instructor Laurel Thatcher Ulrich (center) calls such artifacts "portals," colorful tunnels into a past traditionally accessible only through the close study of texts.

Crossing Disciplines, Finding Knowledge

Harvard Gazette story features Radcliffe's "University as a Collector" conference as illustrating how artifacts and objects can help students understand literature, science, and history. 

Natalie Smith, Dennis Sun, and Eleanor Wilkinson. Photo by Kevin GradyNatalie Smith, Dennis Sun, and Eleanor Wilkinson. Photo by Kevin Grady

Radcliffe Institute Awards Fay Prize to Top Harvard Theses

Radcliffe recognizes Harvard College seniors Dennis Sun, Natalie Smith, and Eleanor Wilkinson.

Photo by Stephanie Mitchell, Harvard Staff PhotographerPhoto by Stephanie Mitchell, Harvard Staff Photographer

Death Penalty, in Retreat

Radcliffe Institute fellow Carol Steiker, Harvard's Henry J. Friendly Professor of Law, discusses the history of capital punishment and the Supreme Court and the death penalty's waning prominence in American justice.