Janet L. Yellen. Photo courtesy of the Federal ReserveJanet L. Yellen. Photo courtesy of the Federal Reserve

Announcing Janet Yellen As Radcliffe Medalist

On Radcliffe Day, May 27, 
2016, the Institute will honor Janet Yellen, chair of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, with the Radcliffe Medal.

Photo by Stephanie MitchellPhoto by Stephanie Mitchell

A Bleak, Troubling History

Laurence Ralph has used his time as a Radcliffe Fellow to study police violence and race in Chicago. "I wanted to examine the contradiction between the fact that the police are supposed to safeguard citizens and yet they're contributing to an alarming number of violent deaths," he says.

Photo by Kevin GradyPhoto by Kevin Grady

At Radcliffe, a Child’s-eye View of Art, and Vice Versa

The Boston Globe reviews Radcliffe fellow and filmmaker Valérie Massadian’s installation “Little People and Other Things” at Harvard University’s Radcliffe Institute. 

Campaign buttons from 1972 for Shirley Chisholm, the first African-American candidate to run for president of the United States and the first woman to seek the democratic presidential nomination.Campaign buttons from 1972 for Shirley Chisholm, the first African-American candidate to run for president of the United States and the first woman to seek the democratic presidential nomination.

Pinning Their Hopes on Buttons

Radcliffe's Schlesinger Library and the Kennedy School hold thousands of political buttons between them, ranging from school committee contests to presidential campaigns.

President Drew Faust speaking at a Radcliffe Institute event. Photo by Tony RinaldoPresident Drew Faust speaking at a Radcliffe Institute event. Photo by Tony Rinaldo

Harvard to Honor Slaves Who Worked, Lived at Wadsworth House

The Boston Globe highlights Harvard University President Drew Faust's announcement that in 2017 the Radcliffe Institute plans to host a major conference about universities and slavery.

Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

Michael Pollan: "I’m Uncomfortable with the Foodie Label"

With his Netflix documentary series Cooked now out, the award-winning journalist and Radcliffe fellow discusses bad food in England in the 70s, and a party with cheese-loving nuns with The Guardian

Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

5 More Native Women Who Know Their History

Radcliffe fellow Alyssa Mt. Pleasant is recognized for her work teaching Native history. 

Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

TS Eliot Prize: Poet Sarah Howe Wins With "Amazing" Debut

Sarah Howe RI '16, whom judges say "will change British poetry," was awarded the prize for her collection Loop of Jade, which examines the poet's joint British and Chinese heritage. 

Deborah Parker, former vice chairwoman of the Tulalip Tribes of Washington State. Photo by Susan Walsh, Associated PressDeborah Parker, former vice chairwoman of the Tulalip Tribes of Washington State. Photo by Susan Walsh, Associated Press

A Sliver of a Full Moon, but Not the Full Moon Yet

Mary Kathryn Nagle, an attorney and citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, wrote Sliver of a Full Moon so that Native women survivors of violence could share their stories.

Photo by Aaron TredwellPhoto by Aaron Tredwell

Ways with Words Conference Will Spark Conversation

Radcliffe Institute’s conference “Ways with Words: Exploring Language and Gender” will include author and trans advocate Janet Mock, whose memoir, “Redefining Realness,” examines her quest for gender "selfhood."

Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

Peter Behrens: ‘The only thing making me write is all I don’t know’

The Globe & Mail spoke with author Peter Behrens about his new novel, Carry Me. Originally from Montreal, Behrens currently lives in Boston, where he is a fellow at Harvard University’s Radcliffe Institute. 

Photo by Kris SnibbePhoto by Kris Snibbe

A Hearing for Pleas to Right Wrongs

A new Radcliffe project seeks to restore Native American voices to historical and political scholarship by digitizing thousands of petitions to the Massachusetts legislature. 

Photo by Stephanie MitchellPhoto by Stephanie Mitchell

Lines That Go Swish

The Harvard Gazette speaks with poet and Radcliffe fellow Ross Gay, who is a finalist for the National Book Award for his latest book of poems, Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude.

Photo by Stephanie MitchellPhoto by Stephanie Mitchell

Turns of Narrative

For novelist Claire Messud RI '05, getting the story down can mean letting it stray: "Even if you have an idea of how you want a piece to end, by the time you have created these people and set them in motion, they have their own laws, their own organic natures, and they don’t always want to fit your ideas."

Photo by Kevin Grady, Radcliffe Staff PhotographerPhoto by Kevin Grady, Radcliffe Staff Photographer

Striving for Imperfection

Reiko Yamada RI '16 created Reflective based on the aesthetic concept of imperfection in human life. The unique interaction of movement and music can be experienced the week of January 25 in the Johnson-Kulukundis Family Gallery. Creation of the installation included Radcliffe Research Partners Ben Wetherfield '17 and Phil Golub '16.

teamLab at Radcliffe

For Gallery Visitors, a Chance to Be One with the Art

A new installation at Radcliffe by teamLab, a collaborative of engineers and artists, transforms viewers into virtual artists.

Karole Armitage presented this year's Julia S. Phelps Annual Lecture in the Arts and Humanities. Photo by Kevin Grady, Radcliffe Staff PhotographerKarole Armitage presented this year's Julia S. Phelps Annual Lecture in the Arts and Humanities. Photo by Kevin Grady, Radcliffe Staff Photographer

Karole Armitage: Dancing In and Out of the Box

“I was born with this idea that I wanted to be an artist, because I wanted to understand what it means to be a human,” says Karole Armitage RI '16. “What it means to be alive.” She chose to write on the air with her body—and this is how she comes to know her place in the world.

Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

$425,000 Award from MacArthur Foundation to SHARIAsource

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation has awarded $425,000 for the development of SHARIAsource—an online Islamic law resource founded and directed by Harvard Law School Professor and Radcliffe Professor Intisar Rabb.

Photo by Kevin Grady, Radcliffe Staff PhotographerPhoto by Kevin Grady, Radcliffe Staff Photographer

New Research Grants to Use the Schlesinger’s Collections

The Schlesinger Library's 2015 grant recipients include researchers investigating women’s activism in STEM fields, the American labor movement, immigration reform, women oyster shuckers, the suffragist Alice Paul, and the environmental and occupational health doctor Harriet Hardy.