Jennifer Weintraub (left), Digital Archivist/Librarian, and Jane Kamensky, Schlesinger Library Director, view a selection of items from the Blackwell collection before they are installed in the new exhibit. Photo by Kris Snibbe.Jennifer Weintraub (left), Digital Archivist/Librarian, and Jane Kamensky, Schlesinger Library Director, view a selection of items from the Blackwell collection before they are installed in the new exhibit. Photo by Kris Snibbe.

A Family of Common Zeal

Fierce devotion to reform and equality is the dominant theme running through the exhibition Women of the Blackwell Family: Resilience and Change, on view at the Schlesinger Library.

Photo by Stephanie MitchellPhoto by Stephanie Mitchell

Nature as Storm Defender

The sometimes negative impact of seawalls was examined during Radcliffe's "Next in Science" series featuring Northeastern University's Rachel Gittman and Ana Širović of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

Photo by Jon Chase, Harvard Staff PhotographerPhoto by Jon Chase, Harvard Staff Photographer

Turning the Brain Green

Could a better understanding of the brain’s reward system—a network fine-tuned over millions of years and focused on survival—help mankind skirt environmental disaster? Neurosurgeon Ann-Christine Duhaime RI '16 thinks it’s entirely possible. 

The Sound of Her Voice

Since long before the publication of Loop of Jade (2015), her debut collection, Sarah Howe has been a highly regarded and much-loved member of the UK poetry scene. She is not currently in the UK, however; for a little while longer, she is a fellow at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

Janet Yellen Talks Policy and Inequality at Radcliffe Day Celebration

Harvard Magazine says of Radcliffe Medalist Federal Reserve Chair, "Yellen has been unapologetic in her view that restraining inequality is inherent in the Fed’s mandate, a role which has cemented her leadership in the public conversation on inequality." 

Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

From around the World and across Harvard

“The fellowship class has an amazing reach and diversity, both topically and geographically,” said Dean Lizabeth Cohen. “They are coming from six continents to study subjects ranging from black holes and depictions of the heavens in Chinese art to fossils in the ocean floor."

Photo by Webb ChappellPhoto by Webb Chappell

Hours After Winning Pulitzer, Nguyen Reads in Cambridge

The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen RI '09 wins the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. Nguyen's winning debut novel is a layered immigrant tale told in the wry, confessional voice of a "man of two minds"—and two countries, Vietnam and the United States. 

Photo by Jon ChasePhoto by Jon Chase

Photographing Native American Cultures

Almost four years after beginning her journey, photographer Matika Wilbur has arrived at Harvard with 25 selections from her ongoing work, Seeds of Culture: The Portraits and Stories of Native American Women. Wilbur visited close to 350 tribes and shot thousands of photographs. 

Campaign buttons from 1972 for Shirley Chisholm, the first African-American candidate to run for president of the United States and the first woman to seek the democratic presidential nomination.Campaign buttons from 1972 for Shirley Chisholm, the first African-American candidate to run for president of the United States and the first woman to seek the democratic presidential nomination.

Pinning Their Hopes on Buttons

Radcliffe's Schlesinger Library and the Kennedy School hold thousands of political buttons between them, ranging from school committee contests to presidential campaigns.