Reading Shapes

Harvard Gazette
Friday, June 6, 2014
Photo by Kris SnibbePhoto by Kris Snibbe

Evolutionary biologists have long held up songbirds, particularly the Galapagos finches first described by Charles Darwin, as an example of natural selection at work. In order to exploit different environments and food sources, the birds developed a startling variety of beak shapes — from short, blunt beaks ideal for cracking seeds and nuts to long, slender beaks designed to sip nectar from flowers. The assumption was that natural selection was the primary, if not the sole, cause for the variation.

Radcliffe Asks, “What Is Life?”

Harvard Magazine
Tuesday, June 3, 2014
Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

"I believe that the engineering of life is the technology of this century," declared panelist Pam Silver, RI '12, Adams professor of biochemistry and systems biology at Harvard Medical School, during the "What is Life?" talk on Radcliffe Day 2014. 

Genius at the School Gates

Harvard Magazine
Tuesday, June 3, 2014
Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

During the Radcliffe Day panel on gender and the business of fiction, panelist Elisabeth Schmitz '86 of Grove Atlantic said, "The question that comes up again and again is whether or not a large sample of women writers are, by default of their gender, being passed over as serious writers and their work perceived as a separate genre: 'women's fiction.'"

Faust: "There Is Still a Considerable Way to Go"

Harvard Magazine
Friday, May 30, 2014
Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

Addressing a packed audience, Radcliffe Medal recipient and Harvard President Drew Faust focused on the history and future of women's rights in the United States and globally.

Radcliffe Talks Voting

Harvard Magazine
Friday, May 30, 2014
Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

Celebrating its 15th anniversary, the Radcliffe Institute honored this year’s recipient of the Radcliffe Medal—Drew Faust—with a panel discussion that explored “why and how the world’s greatest democracy has long struggled over which of its citizens can vote.” 

Radcliffe Day 2014 Highlights

Friday, May 30, 2014
Photo by Tony Rinaldo

More than 950 alumnae/i, fellows, faculty, students, University leaders, and friends came to Radcliffe Yard to celebrate 15 years of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and 135 years of Radcliffe.

Faust Says Women Should Press Ahead

Harvard Gazette
Friday, May 30, 2014
Photo by Stephanie MitchellPhoto by Stephanie Mitchell

"I worry that a complacency is emerging in our society about the place of women, a complacency that too easily forgets that things were once otherwise and there is still a considerable way to go in American society," said President Drew Faust. Faust was honored with the Radcliffe Medal.

Radcliffe Day: A Celebration of Ideas

@ The Radcliffe Institute
Thursday, May 29, 2014

The Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study turns 15 and fittingly awards the Radcliffe Medal to its founding dean, Harvard President Drew Gilpin Faust. 

Moving to Center Stage: Arts

Harvard Gazette
Monday, May 26, 2014
Artist Maria Molteni helps Harvard Professor and Radcliffe Fellow Hans Tutschku install a multimedia exhibit created with students from the Harvard Dance Program. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerArtist Maria Molteni helps Harvard Professor and Radcliffe Fellow Hans Tutschku install a multimedia exhibit created with students from the Harvard Dance Program. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer

A look at Harvard's future arts landscape. Says Radcliffe Dean Cohen: “In 10 years, I would hope to see a Harvard campus that is very stimulating aesthetically and reminds us as we move through it that our campus is a canvas that should reflect the same brilliance and creativity that we find in the University’s museums, libraries, and classrooms.”

Ben Miller Selected as 2014–2015 Radcliffe Institute Fellow

Cornell College News
Monday, May 26, 2014

Harvard's Radcliffe Institute has selected nonfiction writer Ben Miller to be a Radcliffe Institute fellow for the 2014–2015 academic year.

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