Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo
LuciaAllais
2013–2014
Frieda L. Miller Fellow
Princeton University
Architecture
Designs of Destruction: Architectural Preservation in the Age of Total War

Lucia Allais, an architectural historian and theorist, is an assistant professor at Princeton University. Her work explores how architectural practices intersect with politics, aesthetics, and culture in the modern era. She also writes about architectural preservation, contemporary design, and the historiography of art and architecture.

At Radcliffe, Allais is completing a book about the international protection of monuments from the ravages of war and modernization in the middle of the 20th century—from the League of Nations provisions in the 1930s through the World Heritage Convention signed in 1972. Allais asks how building materiality and international ideologies combined to make monuments into privileged objects of cooperation on the global stage, and she provocatively argues that destruction became an instrument of design throughout this period.

Allais has worked as an architect in Europe and the United States and frequently appears on design juries. She has received grants from the Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach Foundation, the Graham Foundation, and the National Gallery of Art, among others. Her work appears in Grey Room (for which she is an editor), Log, Perspecta, Volume, and the books Global Design History (Routledge, 2011) and Governing by Design: Architecture, Economy, and Politics in the Twentieth Century (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2012). She is also a member of the Aggregate architectural history collaborative. Allais earned her MArch from Harvard and her PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and she was a postdoctoral fellow at the Princeton University Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts.

This information is accurate as of the fellowship year indicated for each fellow.
Photo by Tony Rinaldo