Nick Turse photo by Tony Rinaldo
NickTurse
2010–2011
Columbia University
Nonfiction
Kill Anything That Moves: US War Crimes and Civilian Slaughter during the Vietnam War

Nick Turse is an award-winning journalist, historian, and essayist and the associate editor of the Nation Institute’s TomDispatch.com. He is the author of The Complex: How the Military Invades Our Everyday Lives (Metropolitan Books, 2008), and his work on current national security issues and US war crimes during the Vietnam War has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, the Nation, and the San Francisco Chronicle, among many other print and on-line publications.

Turse is currently working on a history of US war crimes and Vietnamese civilian suffering during the Vietnam War. His work entails weaving together formerly classified US military documents, interviews with American veterans and Vietnamese survivors, and long-forgotten published reports of atrocities, among other sources. He is also currently working on two related projects dealing with Vietnam and Cambodia.

Turse was the recipient of a special Ridenhour Prize for Reportorial Distinction in 2009 for his investigation of civilian slaughter by US troops during Operation Speedy Express. He received a James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism and a MOLLY National Journalism Prize honorable mention, as well. Turse has previously been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, grants from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and the Nation Institute’s Investigative Fund, and a fellowship at New York University’s Center for the United States and the Cold War. He holds a PhD in sociomedical sciences from Columbia University, where he is an associate research scientist at the Center for the History and Ethics of Public Health.

This information is accurate as of the fellowship year indicated for each fellow.