Program for the 1988 Women in Theatre Festival. Courtesy of Schlesinger LibraryProgram for the 1988 Women in Theatre Festival. Courtesy of Schlesinger Library

Theatrical Women in Boston and Beyond: The Women in Theatre Festival

July 23, 2015

In 1983 Sophie Parker and Tita Wernimont cofounded Watermelon Studio, Inc. (later Next Stage Theatre), a theatrical company in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, creating a venue in which local women theater professionals could present original work. It featured a women’s theatre festival, offering performances from a broad range of cultures and viewpoints.

Hershe Michele Kramer and Estelle Coleman, May 8, 2015. Photo by Nancy A. CloverHershe Michele Kramer and Estelle Coleman, May 8, 2015. Photo by Nancy A. Clover

A Herstory Happening

June 18, 2015

It was 1983, the Cold War was in full swing, and concern over the deployment of nuclear weapons in Europe was a chilly reality. In reaction, a group of women established a place—the Women’s Encampment for a Future of Peace and Justice (WEFPJ)—to come together to protest and organize.

People lined up outside the United States Lines shipping office, hoping for a place on a United States-bound ship. Photo courtesy of Schlesinger LibraryPeople lined up outside the United States Lines shipping office, hoping for a place on a United States-bound ship. Photo courtesy of Schlesinger Library

What If War Broke Out While You Were on Vacation?

May 21, 2015

Nona Baldwin Brown (1918–2014), who became one of the first woman cub reporters for the city section of the New York Times in the 1940s, documented in photographs her ocean voyage from Europe after the outbreak of war.

Cartoon from unknown newspaper featuring Ogarita Booth, November 14, 1976.

Izola Forrester's Memoir, This One Mad Act: The Unknown Story of John Wilkes Booth and His Family by His Granddaughter

April 16, 2015

Almost from the moment of President Lincoln's assassination, questions began to circulate about John Wilkes Booth.  Was he acting on his own or was he directed by Confederate leaders seeking revenge for their defeat in the Civil War?  Was the man killed at Garrett's Farm really Booth, or did he escape and assume another identity?  While these questions have been debated by the descendants of Martha Lizola Mills, they have also debated a more personal question: is John Wilkes Booth their ancestor?

Postcard with hair attached to portrait (detail), ca.1900. Ames family historical collectionPostcard with hair attached to portrait (detail), ca.1900. Ames family historical collection

Tokens of Eternal Life: Locks of Hair in Collections

March 17, 2015

The Schlesinger Library’s manuscript collections often contain many different types of materials, from correspondence and diaries, to photographs and film. A few collections also contain more distinctive objects, such as keepsakes of locks of hair.

Louise Holborn: Advocating for Refugees

February 19, 2015

Louise Wilhelmine Holborn (1898-1975) was an educator, political scientist, and internationally recognized author on refugee issues. She was born in Berlin-Charlottenburg, Germany and grew up in a close-knit family of educators. Her personal papers provide insights into her struggle to obtain a graduate degree, document the erosion of German women’s rights during World War II, and detail her activities on behalf of international refugees.

Radcliffe students attending YWCA conference at Silver Bay, New York, 1916. Courtesy of Schlesinger LibraryRadcliffe students attending YWCA conference at Silver Bay, New York, 1916. Courtesy of Schlesinger Library

Collaboration Among the Seven Siblings

January 15, 2015

With support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Schlesinger Library is collaborating with archivists from the former "Seven Sisters" women's colleges on The History of Women’s Education Open Access Portal Project.

Jessie Hainning Rupert (detail from program for the 43rd reunion of the 34th Massachusetts Regiment), 1908. Courtesy of Schlesinger LibraryJessie Hainning Rupert (detail from program for the 43rd reunion of the 34th Massachusetts Regiment), 1908. Courtesy of Schlesinger Library

“Angel of the Shenandoah”

December 18, 2014

A new collection of papers of a Civil War heroine has arrived just in time to coincide with the opening of the Schlesinger Library’s exhibit, What They Wrote, What They Saved: The Personal Civil War. Known as the "Angel of the Shenandoah," Jessie Hainning Rupert (1831–1909) was born in Scotland and moved with her family to Ohio in the 1830s.

July 1972 inaugural issue of Ms. Courtesy of Schlesinger LibraryJuly 1972 inaugural issue of Ms. Courtesy of Schlesinger Library

Behind the Scenes at Magazines

November 21, 2014

How do "ordinary women" describe their lives, construct identity, experience, and participate in mass media and culture? How can historians learn about the lived experience of most women, whose lives are outside of the public eye? One approach is to examine letters written to trusted magazines.

That Takes Ovaries: Bold Females and Their Brazen Acts book jacket, 2004. Courtesy of Schlesinger LibraryThat Takes Ovaries: Bold Females and Their Brazen Acts book jacket, 2004. Courtesy of Schlesinger Library

Deconstructing That Takes Ovaries

October 2, 2014

That Takes Ovaries: Bold Women and Their Brazen Acts is a book, a play, an "open-mic" movement, a nonprofit organization dedicated to issues of women’s equality and empowerment, and now a digital collection at the Schlesinger Library.

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