Cover of Sassy, April 1996. Courtesy of Schlesinger LibraryCover of Sassy, April 1996. Courtesy of Schlesinger Library

Getting Sassy at the Schlesinger: Circulating and Censoring Teenage Female Sexuality in the 1990s

November 24, 2015

Within historical literatures and zine cultures of the feminist third-wave, Sassy occupies an unprecedented and unparalleled position. Created with the primary purpose of providing honest sex education to America's teen girls, the magazine was staffed with women not long out of their own adolescence.

Excerpt from Lillian Belle Herrick Chapman's wireless telegraphy journal, 1901-1902. Courtesy of Schlesinger LibraryExcerpt from Lillian Belle Herrick Chapman's wireless telegraphy journal, 1901-1902. Courtesy of Schlesinger Library

Science and Spirits

October 30, 2015

Lillian Belle Herrick Chapman (1872–1965) was a science teacher, ordained Congregational minister, and poet, whose family were ardent believers in spiritualism.

Bert Hartry_photo courtesy of Schlesinger Library

Bert Hartry

October 7, 2015

The Schlesinger Library has lost a cherished colleague, a lover of archives, and one of our most devoted fans. Bert Hartry, who began working at the Library in 1978, died on September 16.

Preprinted promotional label pasted onto the front free endpaper of Avis DeVoto's copy of Mastering the Art of   French Cooking, vol. 2. Courtesy of the Schlesinger LibraryPreprinted promotional label pasted onto the front free endpaper of Avis DeVoto's copy of Mastering the Art of French Cooking, vol. 2. Courtesy of the Schlesinger Library

Avis DeVoto and the Case of the Missing Mustard

September 24, 2015

The Schlesinger Library has several wonderful association copies of Mastering the Art of French Cooking, including those of Denise Schorr, Barbara Ketcham Wheaton, and Ruth Lockwood. The capstone, however, is our recent acquisition of inscribed copies that belonged to Avis DeVoto.

Death masks of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti. Courtesy of Schlesinger LibraryDeath masks of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti. Courtesy of Schlesinger Library

Remembering Sacco and Vanzetti

August 21, 2015

Papers of women and families held by the Schlesinger Library document various aspects of the high profile, emotionally charged Sacco and Vanzetti case.

Program for the 1988 Women in Theatre Festival. Courtesy of Schlesinger LibraryProgram for the 1988 Women in Theatre Festival. Courtesy of Schlesinger Library

Theatrical Women in Boston and Beyond: The Women in Theatre Festival

July 23, 2015

In 1983 Sophie Parker and Tita Wernimont cofounded Watermelon Studio, Inc. (later Next Stage Theatre), a theatrical company in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, creating a venue in which local women theater professionals could present original work. It featured a women’s theatre festival, offering performances from a broad range of cultures and viewpoints.

Hershe Michele Kramer and Estelle Coleman, May 8, 2015. Photo by Nancy A. CloverHershe Michele Kramer and Estelle Coleman, May 8, 2015. Photo by Nancy A. Clover

A Herstory Happening

June 18, 2015

It was 1983, the Cold War was in full swing, and concern over the deployment of nuclear weapons in Europe was a chilly reality. In reaction, a group of women established a place—the Women’s Encampment for a Future of Peace and Justice (WEFPJ)—to come together to protest and organize.

People lined up outside the United States Lines shipping office, hoping for a place on a United States-bound ship. Photo courtesy of Schlesinger LibraryPeople lined up outside the United States Lines shipping office, hoping for a place on a United States-bound ship. Photo courtesy of Schlesinger Library

What If War Broke Out While You Were on Vacation?

May 21, 2015

Nona Baldwin Brown (1918–2014), who became one of the first woman cub reporters for the city section of the New York Times in the 1940s, documented in photographs her ocean voyage from Europe after the outbreak of war.

Cartoon from unknown newspaper featuring Ogarita Booth, November 14, 1976.

Izola Forrester's Memoir, This One Mad Act: The Unknown Story of John Wilkes Booth and His Family by His Granddaughter

April 16, 2015

Almost from the moment of President Lincoln's assassination, questions began to circulate about John Wilkes Booth.  Was he acting on his own or was he directed by Confederate leaders seeking revenge for their defeat in the Civil War?  Was the man killed at Garrett's Farm really Booth, or did he escape and assume another identity?  While these questions have been debated by the descendants of Martha Lizola Mills, they have also debated a more personal question: is John Wilkes Booth their ancestor?

Postcard with hair attached to portrait (detail), ca.1900. Ames family historical collectionPostcard with hair attached to portrait (detail), ca.1900. Ames family historical collection

Tokens of Eternal Life: Locks of Hair in Collections

March 17, 2015

The Schlesinger Library’s manuscript collections often contain many different types of materials, from correspondence and diaries, to photographs and film. A few collections also contain more distinctive objects, such as keepsakes of locks of hair.

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