June Jordan Collection

February 1, 2016
June Jordan: Writer, Activist, Voice for Liberation

The June Jordan collection at the Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University includes poetry, unpublished writing, speeches, letters, photographs, audio, video, and more.

Peter Behrens | A Writer on Writing

January 25, 2016
Peter Behrens, A Writer on Writing

The writer Peter Behrens RI ’16—who holds the Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Foundation Fellowship at Radcliffe—talks about how he decided to become a writer and why he writes what he writes. 


Behrens will discuss his work in his fellow's presentation, "Families, Histories, Novels," on Wednesday, January 27, 2016, at 4 p.m. in the Sheerr Room at Fay House in Radcliffe Yard.

Scott Milner | Exploring Light-Harvesting Polymers

January 19, 2016
Scott Milner, Exploring Light-Harvesting Polymers

The theoretical physicist and Radcliffe Institute fellow Scott Milner, who is the William H. Joyce Chair in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Pennsylvania State University, explains how his exploration of polymers could lead to a greater ability to harvest energy from sunlight in sustainable and affordable ways.

Milner will discuss his work in his fellow's presentation, "Innovative Polymers for Printable Photocells: Multiscale Theory for Materials Design," on Wednesday, February 3, 2016, at 4 p.m. at the Knafel Center in Radcliffe Yard.

Intisar A. Rabb | Qāḍī Justice

January 12, 2016
Intisar A. Rabb, Qāḍī Justice

As part of the 2015–2016 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Intisar A. Rabb RI ’16 investigates the significance of the procedures taken in early Islamic courts and the challenges they pose to our understanding of the meaning and operation of early Islamic law.

Intisar A. Rabb is the 2015–2016 Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Professor at Radcliffe and a professor of law at Harvard Law School, where she is also the director of the Islamic Legal Studies Program.

Claudia Escobar | Judicial Independence, Separation of Powers, and Corruption

January 6, 2016
Claudia Escobar, Judicial Independence, Separation of Powers, and Corruption

As part of the 2015–2016 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Claudia Escobar RI ’16 explores how corruption is directly linked to the lack of judicial independence.

Using her experience in Guatemala as an example, Escobar sheds light on how judges in the higher courts are appointed without respecting international principles or judicial independence, which enables political entities and other powerful groups to control the justice system, thus promoting impunity and corruption.

Claudia Escobar is the 2015–2016 Robert G. James Scholar at Risk Fellow, part of Harvard’s Scholar at Risk program.

Sliver of a Full Moon | Play Reading and Discussion

December 10, 2015
Sliver of a Full Moon

Sliver of a Full Moon is a powerful reenactment of the historic congressional reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) in 2013: a movement that restored the authority of tribal governments to prosecute non-Native abusers who assault and abuse Native women on tribal lands. 

Written by Mary Kathryn Nagle (Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma)
Directed by Betsy Theobald Richards (Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma)

Immediately following the performance is a panel discussion moderated by Daniel Carpenter, director of the Social Sciences Program, Radcliffe Institute, and Allie S. Freed Professor of Government, Harvard University.
Joseph William Singer, the Bussey Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, introduces the panel, which includes:
Maggie McKinley (Fond du Lac Chippewa), a Climenko Fellow and a lecturer on law at Harvard Law School;
Mary Kathryn Nagle (Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma), a playwright; and
Angela Riley (Citizen Potawatomi Nation of Oklahoma), the Oneida Indian Nation Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School.

Maryanne Kowaleski | Living by the Sea

December 7, 2015
Maryanne Kowaleski presents Living by the Sea

As part of the 2015–2016 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Maryanne Kowaleski RI ’16 presents “Living by the Sea: Women, Work, and Family in Maritime Communities in Medieval England,” in which she explores the powerful role that marine ecosystems have taken in promoting a distinctive subculture among the inhabitants of coastal villages, small port towns, and even quayside neighborhoods in larger seaports.

Maryanne Kowaleski is the Joy Foundation Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute and the Joseph Fitzpatrick S.J. Distinguished Professor of History and Medieval Studies at Fordham University.

Ann-Christine Duhaime | The Neurobiology of Sustainable Behavior

November 17, 2015
Ann-Christine Duhaime, The Neurobiology of Sustainable Behavior

As part of the 2015–2016 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Ann-Christine Duhaime RI ’16 presents “Brain Rewards, Plasticity, and Consumption: The Neurobiology of Sustainable Behavior,” in which she explores how inherent brain drive and reward systems may influence behaviors affecting the environment.

Duhaime is the Nicholas T. Zervas Professor of Neurosurgery at Harvard Medical School.

Dan Barouch | Prospects for a Vaccine and a Cure for HIV

November 16, 2015
Dan Barouch, Prospects for a Vaccine and a Cure for HIV

A lecture by Dan Barouch, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Molecular science has revolutionized the approach to vaccine and drug development. The goal of this lecture is to describe the current state of the HIV epidemic and the prospects for developing a vaccine or a cure for this disease.

Introduced by Janet Rich-Edwards, codirector of the Science Program, Radcliffe Institute; associate professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School; associate professor, Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Sarah Howe | Two Systems

November 6, 2015
Sarah Howe, Two Systems

Sarah Howe, the 2015–2016 Frieda L. Miller Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, presents “Two Systems,” a new sequence of poems in which she explores the historical encounter between China and the West.

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