Khalil Gibran Muhammad | How Numbers Lie

March 17, 2016
Khalil Gibran Muhammad, How Numbers Lie

“How Numbers Lie: Intersectional Violence and the Quantification of Race”

Tracing the genealogy of statistical discourses on race, Khalil Gibran Muhammad explores the violence of racial quantification on black women and men’s lives beginning in the postbellum period.

Currently the director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture of the New York Public Library and a visiting professor at the City University of New York, Muhammad will begin his academic appointments as a professor of history, race, and public policy at Harvard Kennedy School and a Suzanne Young Murray Professor at Radcliffe on July 1, 2016.

Presented by the Schlesinger Library at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

Video:

Welcome by Lizabeth Cohen, Dean of the Radcliffe Institute

Introduction by Jane Kamensky,  Pforzheimer Foundation Director of the Schlesinger Library - 6:55

Lecture by Khalil Gibran Muhammad - 15:50 

 

Ross Gay | A Book of Flowers

March 9, 2016
Ross Gay, A Book of Flowers

As part of the 2015–2016 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Ross Gay RI ’16 reads from his “catalog” of poetry, professes his love of the goumi berry, and attributes learning to read to following along with Maurice White’s lyrics while listening to Earth, Wind & Fire records. 

Gay is the 2015–2016 Walter Jackson Bate Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

Joyce M. Bell | Race and Resistance

March 9, 2016
Joyce M. Bell, Race and Resistance

As part of the 2015–2016 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Joyce M. Bell RI ’16 addresses questions about the legacy of the Black Power Movement.

Bell is the 2015–2016 Maury Green Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

Women's History Month: Radcliffe Connections

March 8, 2016
Amelia Earhart video still from Women's History Month video

In recognition of Women's History Month, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study presents Susan B. Anthony, Helen Keller, Amelia Earhart, Dorothy West, Betty Friedan, June Jordan, Julia Child, Anna Deveare Smith, and Elizabeth Warren. These nine remarkable women have all made history—and they have something else in common: a connection to Radcliffe.

Robin W. Cotton | Forensic DNA Testing

March 1, 2016
Robin W. Cotton, Forensic DNA Testing

As part of the DNA lecture series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Robin W. Cotton reports on the current state of forensic DNA testing and explains why there are still bumps in the road. 

Robin W. Cotton is an associate professor and the director of the Biomedical Forensic Sciences Program at the Boston University School of Medicine.

Household Workers Unite

February 25, 2016
Household Workers Unite

This panel brings together scholars and activists to discuss the historical and contemporary significance of domestic worker organizing.

Featuring:
Lydia Edwards, Massachusetts Coalition of Domestic Workers
Premilla Nadasen, Department of History, Barnard College
Monique Nguyen, MataHari
Natalicia Tracy, Brazilian Worker Center 

Moderated by Rakesh Khurana, Dean of Harvard College and Marvin Bower Professor of Leadership Development, Harvard Business School

Introduced by Jane Kamensky, Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Foundation Director of the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America and Professor of History, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Scott Milner | New Polymers for Solar Power

February 23, 2016
Scott Milner, New Polymers for Solar Power

As part of the 2015–2016 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Scott T. Milner RI ’16 discusses current trends in solar power, how solar cells work, and how polymer-based materials may offer an attractive alternative to silicon.

Joyce M. Bell | American Race Relations: How Far Have We Come?

February 19, 2016
Joyce M. Bell, American Race Relations: How Far Have We Come?

From the Black Power movement to the Black Lives Matter movement today, what has changed? How far have we come? The sociologist Joyce M. Bell is struck by how much it’s still the same.

She is the 2015–2016 Maury Green Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.


Bell will discuss her work in her fellow's presentation, "Race and Resistance: The Lasting Legacy of the Black Power Movement," on Wednesday, February 24, 2016, at 4 p.m. in the Sheerr Room at Fay House in Radcliffe Yard.

Doris A. Taylor | When Cell Therapy Isn’t Enough

February 17, 2016
Doris A. Taylor, When Cell Therapy Isn’t Enough

In her talk “When Cell Therapy Isn’t Enough: Building Cardiovascular Solutions in 2016,” Doris A. Taylor discusses improvements to stem-cell therapies and the development of better treatments for heart disease, including building bio-artificial organs for transplant that use a patient’s own stem cells, thus avoiding the complications of organ rejection.

Peter Behrens | Families, Histories, Novels

February 10, 2016
Peter Behrens, Families, Histories, Novels

Drawing from his own family’s history, the writer Peter Behrens RI ’16 discusses time, memory, and the ways the past shapes the present.

Part of the 2015–2016 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

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