Confronting Violence | Performance and Discussion about Hip-Hop

April 23, 2015
Confronting Violence, Performance and Discussion about Hip-Hop

WELCOMING REMARKS
Lizabeth Cohen, Dean of the Radcliffe Institute and Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies, Department of History, Harvard University

PERFORMANCE AND DISCUSSION ABOUT HIP-HOP
Moderator: Marcyliena Morgan, Professor of African and African American Studies and Executive Director, Hiphop Archive & Research Institute, Harvard University

8:18 Toni Blackman, Rapper, Poet, and Activist; Founder and Director, Freestyle Union

28:10 Byron Hurt, Documentary Filmmaker (Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes), Author, and Antisexism Activist; Founding Member, Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) program

47:02 Jay Smooth, Video and Multimedia Producer; Founder, WBAI’s Underground Railroad

1:00:14 Q&A

Confronting Violence | The Power of Activism

April 23, 2015
Confronting Violence, The Power of Activism

WELCOMING REMARKS
Lizabeth Cohen, Dean, Radcliffe Institute; Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies, Department of History, Harvard University

OVERVIEW 
7:18 Janet Rich-Edwards, Codirector of the Science Program, Academic Ventures, Radcliffe Institute; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; and Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

THE POWER OF ACTIVISM
This panel examines the potential for national and international activism to reduce the impact of violence and to improve how communities respond to violence.  

15:41 Moderator: Diane L. Rosenfeld, Lecturer on Law, Harvard Law School

28:47 Alexandra Brodsky, Cofounder, Know Your IX

44:51 Mitchell Garabedian, Principal Attorney, Law Offices of Mitchell Garabedian

59:45 Irene M. Santiago, Lead Convener, #WomenSeriously, Global Campaign on Women, Peace and Security

1:21:30 Q&A

John Tasioulas | Human Rights

April 14, 2015
John Tasioulas, Human Rights

Radcliffe fellow John Tasioulas RI ’15 raises philosophical inquiries into the nature and basis of human rights.

David Montgomery | Noah’s Flood and the Development of Geology

April 10, 2015
David Montgomery, Noah’s Flood and the Development of Geology

The geologist David Montgomery explores the interface of science and religion through flood stories from cultures around the world.

Diana Taylor | Labyrinth of Things

April 10, 2015
Diana Taylor, Labyrinth of Things

Diana Taylor, scholar of Latin American and US theater and performance, speaks about the play Bom Retiro 958 metros and its broad societal statement about the accumulation and transformation of things.

Taylor is a University Professor, Performance Studies and Spanish, and Founding Director, Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, New York University.

Introduction by Martin Puchner, Byron and Anita Wien Professor of Drama and of English and Comparative Literature and Chair of the Committee on Dramatics, Harvard University.

Henri Cole | Reading: New Poems

March 20, 2015
Henri Cole, Reading New Poems

The poet Henri Cole reads a collection of his poems, both old and new.

Nicholas Carr | The World Is Not the Screen

March 16, 2015
Nicholas Carr, The World Is Not the Screen

The writer Nicholas Carr discusses navigation and wayfinding in the digital age and the personal and social consequences of our reliance on automation.

Bruce Western | Leaving Prison and Entering Poverty

March 10, 2015
Bruce Western, Leaving Prison and Entering Poverty

Bruce Western RI ’15 discusses the scope and consequences of mass incarceration in America and its impact on the institutional landscape of American poverty.

Louise Knight | How Massachusetts Women Became Political

March 10, 2015
Louise Knight, How Massachusetts Women Became Political

The historian Louise W. Knight speaks about the women's antislavery petition campaign in Massachusetts during the summer of 1837 and the leaders of that campaign, Sarah and Angelina Grimké. This campaign marked the beginnings of the long and remarkable history of Massachusetts women's organized political activism. 

Introduction by Susan Ware, senior advisor to the Schlesinger Library at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

ZZ Packer | The Thousands

February 11, 2015
The Thousands by ZZ Packer

The author ZZ Packer RI '15 reads an excerpt from her novel-in-progress, titled "The Thousands," which chronicles the lives of several families—black, white, and Native American—shortly after the Civil War, through Reconstruction and the "Indian Campaigns" in the Southwest.

Packer's reading and remarks are followed by a discussion with Walter Johnson RI '11, the Winthrop Professor of History and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University.

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