Claudia Escobar | Judicial Independence, Separation of Powers, and Corruption

January 6, 2016
Claudia Escobar, Judicial Independence, Separation of Powers, and Corruption

As part of the 2015–2016 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Claudia Escobar RI ’16 explores how corruption is directly linked to the lack of judicial independence.

Using her experience in Guatemala as an example, Escobar sheds light on how judges in the higher courts are appointed without respecting international principles or judicial independence, which enables political entities and other powerful groups to control the justice system, thus promoting impunity and corruption.

Claudia Escobar is the 2015–2016 Robert G. James Scholar at Risk Fellow, part of Harvard’s Scholar at Risk program.

Sliver of a Full Moon | Play Reading and Discussion

December 10, 2015
Sliver of a Full Moon

Sliver of a Full Moon is a powerful reenactment of the historic congressional reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) in 2013: a movement that restored the authority of tribal governments to prosecute non-Native abusers who assault and abuse Native women on tribal lands. 

Written by Mary Kathryn Nagle (Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma)
Directed by Betsy Theobald Richards (Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma)

Immediately following the performance is a panel discussion moderated by Daniel Carpenter, director of the Social Sciences Program, Radcliffe Institute, and Allie S. Freed Professor of Government, Harvard University.
Joseph William Singer, the Bussey Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, introduces the panel, which includes:
Maggie McKinley (Fond du Lac Chippewa), a Climenko Fellow and a lecturer on law at Harvard Law School;
Mary Kathryn Nagle (Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma), a playwright; and
Angela Riley (Citizen Potawatomi Nation of Oklahoma), the Oneida Indian Nation Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School.

This event at the Radcliffe Institute is part of the Initiative on Native and Indigenous Peoples.

Maryanne Kowaleski | Living by the Sea

December 7, 2015
Maryanne Kowaleski presents Living by the Sea

As part of the 2015–2016 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Maryanne Kowaleski RI ’16 presents “Living by the Sea: Women, Work, and Family in Maritime Communities in Medieval England,” in which she explores the powerful role that marine ecosystems have taken in promoting a distinctive subculture among the inhabitants of coastal villages, small port towns, and even quayside neighborhoods in larger seaports.

Maryanne Kowaleski is the Joy Foundation Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute and the Joseph Fitzpatrick S.J. Distinguished Professor of History and Medieval Studies at Fordham University.

Ann-Christine Duhaime | The Neurobiology of Sustainable Behavior

November 17, 2015
Ann-Christine Duhaime, The Neurobiology of Sustainable Behavior

As part of the 2015–2016 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Ann-Christine Duhaime RI ’16 presents “Brain Rewards, Plasticity, and Consumption: The Neurobiology of Sustainable Behavior,” in which she explores how inherent brain drive and reward systems may influence behaviors affecting the environment.

Duhaime is the Nicholas T. Zervas Professor of Neurosurgery at Harvard Medical School.

Dan Barouch | Prospects for a Vaccine and a Cure for HIV

November 16, 2015
Dan Barouch, Prospects for a Vaccine and a Cure for HIV

A lecture by Dan Barouch, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Molecular science has revolutionized the approach to vaccine and drug development. The goal of this lecture is to describe the current state of the HIV epidemic and the prospects for developing a vaccine or a cure for this disease.

Introduced by Janet Rich-Edwards, codirector of the Science Program, Radcliffe Institute; associate professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School; associate professor, Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Sarah Howe | Two Systems

November 6, 2015
Sarah Howe, Two Systems

Sarah Howe, the 2015–2016 Frieda L. Miller Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, presents “Two Systems,” a new sequence of poems in which she explores the historical encounter between China and the West.

Karole Armitage | Naked Body Language

October 30, 2015
Karole Armitage, Naked Body Language

"Naked Body Language—Dance Is Time and Gesture Is Meaningless"
2015–2016 Julia S. Phelps Annual Lecture in the Arts and Humanities

Known as the “punk ballerina,” Karole Armitage RI ’16 considers how meaning is made in dance without words, plot, or story, exploring material from theoretical physics to a personal search for meaning. She is the Mildred Londa Weisman fellow at the Radcliffe Institute.

Armitage is then joined in conversation with Richard Colton, who founded and directs, with Amy Spencer, Summer Stages Dance at Concord Academy, a nationally renowned dance workshop and performance series that takes place each summer at the Institute of Contemporary Arts/Boston.

Introduction by Lizabeth Cohen, dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and the Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies at Harvard University

Karole Armitage | Punk Ballerina

October 26, 2015
Karole Armitage, Punk Ballerina

Karole Armitage RI '16 views ballet as a science of motion—and a brilliant science, at that. Ballet “gives you tools to use your body, to control your body, to have freedom to do what you want.” Armitage has earned her liberation in dance through her philosophies and her infusion of punk rawness, crowning her the punk ballerina. She is the Mildred Londa Weisman fellow at the Radcliffe Institute in 2015-2016.

From her lecture, “Naked Body Language; Dance is Time and Gesture is Meaningless

teamLab Brings Interactive Art to Harvard's Radcliffe Institute

October 23, 2015
teamLab brings interactive art to Harvard's Radcliffe Institute

What’s it like to walk into a living dream, one you can control with a simple wave of your hand? To find out, stop by Radcliffe’s newly refurbished Johnson-Kulukundis Family Gallery in Byerly Hall, where a new interactive installation on view through December 19, 2015, transforms the viewer into the virtual artist.

Video: Director and Editor, Ned Brown; Cinematography, Joe Sherman and Kai-Jae Wang; Interviews, Colleen Walsh/Harvard Staff

DNA Symposium | Mammoths, Neanderthals, and Your Ancestors

October 22, 2015
Mammoths, Neanderthals, and Your Ancestors

WELCOME
Lizabeth Cohen, Dean of the Radcliffe Institute and Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies, Department of History, Harvard University

INTRODUCTION
Janet Rich-Edwards, Codirector of the Science Program, Radcliffe Institute; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

MAMMOTHS, NEANDERTHALS, AND YOUR ANCESTORS
Moderator: George Church, Robert Winthrop Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School
John Hawks, Vilas-Borghesi Distinguished Achievement Professor of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Beth Shapiro, Associate Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz
Spencer Wells, scientist, author, entrepreneur, and former explorer-in-residence and director of the Genographic Project at National Geographic

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