Over the course of the academic year the Radcliffe Institute partners with units across Harvard University to sponsor or highlight a series of programs related to the spring gender conference. These associated events expand on conference themes or explore others that we may not address during the April program. All events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise indicated.

This is a current list of events associated with the thematic years on citizenship and the conference, “Who Belongs? Global Citizenship and Gender in the 21st Century,” taking place at the Radcliffe Institute on April 5–6, 2018.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2017
1 p.m.
It Depends What State You’re In: Policies and Politics of the US Health Care System
Knafel Center, Radcliffe Institute

Health care and political systems are deeply intertwined, with implications for the quality and equality of access to health care. This symposium explored the political dynamics of health care laws and the way they affect people not only as patients but also as citizens.

The video is available here.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2017
4:15 p.m.
The Museum, the City, and the University: Boston Art Museum Directors in Discussion
Knafel Center, Radcliffe Institute

This panel brought together five distinguished museum directors to discuss their leadership of major cultural institutions in urban and university settings and to share personal perspectives on their work. The directors and the moderator addressed questions about the role of museums in debates about public and private support for the humanities and arts; in research and learning endeavors, including creative efforts by living artists; and in conversations about citizenship, identity, and diversity.

The video is available here.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2017
9 a.m.
Voter Registration Information Table for Students
Harvard Graduate School of Education, Gutman Library

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2017
*Open only to Harvard undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows*
“Civic Engagement: Citizenship Student Lunch with Nadya Okamoto”

Part of the Academic Ventures student lunch series, this lunch provided an opportunity for students to discuss issues related to citizenship and gender with Nadya Okamoto. Nadya is a social entrepreneur, community organizer, activist, and student. A current sophomore at Harvard College, Nadya has devoted her efforts to engaging and empowering others, especially young leaders, to engage in service and advocacy. This year, she ran for a seat on the Cambridge City Council, focusing her platform around broad issues of human rights, housing and development, educational equity, sustainable living and environment, university relations, and government accountability. She is the founder and executive director of PERIOD, a nonprofit group dedicated to changing the conversation around menstruation and providing care to those in need, and also recently founded NEXT, a media platform engaging young people in politics to publish actionable and shareable content.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2017
*Open only to Harvard undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows*
Student Lunch with Michael Kazin

Part of the Academic Ventures student lunch series, this lunch provided an opportunity for students to discuss issues related to politics and organizing with Michael Kazin, a professor of history at Georgetown University and an expert in US politics and social movements of the 19th and 20th centuries. He is the author of War against War: The American Fight for Peace, 1914–1918 and American Dreamers: How the Left Changed a Nation, which was named a Best Book of 2011 by the New Republic, Newsweek/Daily Beast, and the Progressive. He is editor of Dissent, a leading magazine of the American left since 1954.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2017
4:15 p.m.
Does the Left Have a Future?
2017–2018 Dean's Lecture in the Social Sciences
Knafel Center, Radcliffe Institute

Nearly everywhere in Europe and the United States, the left is mired in crisis: its intellectuals and activists strike defensive poses and debate how to revive the fortunes of a cause whose adherents once believed they could and would shape the future. Michael Kazin discussed how this crisis occurred and reflect on how the left, both radical and liberal, might move forward again.

The video is available here.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017
*Open only to Harvard undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows*
NoiseScore: Student Lunch with Erica Walker

Part of the Academic Ventures student lunch series, this lunch provides an opportunity for students to discuss issues related to citizenship and science with Erica Walker, an environmental exposure scientist with research interests in community noise. Her primary work involves developing exposure metrics to better predict how community noise impacts human health. She is also dedicated to translating her research into a series of community noise advocacy tools. Walker has measured the sound levels and noise perception extensively in the Greater Boston Area and has documented her work via Noiseandthecity.org. Last year, she released Greater Boston’s first ever interactive community noise report (boston.noiseandthecity.org) and recently released NoiseScoreTM, a smartphone application funded, in part, by the Academic Ventures program at the Radcliffe Institute. NoiseScore allows users to objectively and subjectively describe their environmental soundscape and map their responses in real-time. Walker holds a master’s degree in environmental economics and urban planning from Tufts University and a doctorate in environmental health from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2017
2 p.m.
NoiseScore Cambridge Walking Tour Exploration with Erica Walker
Harvard Square, Cambridge MA

The negative human response to the environmental soundscape—noise—is a significant stressor that has been shown to have adverse impact on the health. Increased hypertension, myocardial infarction, and mortality rates have all been associated with increased exposure to noise. Unfortunately, beyond noise ordinances and noise complaint hotlines, very little is known about noise in cities and the extent to which it disrupts the lives of its residents. NoiseScore is a recently released smartphone application designed to address these shortcomings by allowing users to objectively and subjectively describe their daily soundscape and map their responses in real-time.

In this brief talk, Walker discussed the development of NoiseScore and how it can empower citizens to track and combat community noise issues. After the talk, Walker led a walking tour around the streets of Cambridge to demonstrate how NoiseScore can be used to map and analyze the urban soundscape of the Harvard campus.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2017
*Open only to Harvard undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows*
Student Lunch with Francis Wade

Part of the Academic Ventures student lunch series, this lunch provided an opportunity for students to discuss issues related to citizenship with Francis Wade, a journalist specializing in Myanmar and Southeast Asia. He began reporting on Myanmar in 2009 with the exiled Democratic Voice of Burma news organization, based in northern Thailand, before going on to cover in-depth the transition from military rule and the violence that accompanied it. He has reported from across South and Southeast Asia for Foreign Policy, the Guardian, the Nation, TIME, the Washington Post, and others. His writing and research has focused on ethnic and religious violence, political transitions, and refugee movements. In August 2017, he published his first book, Myanmar’s Enemy Within: Buddhist Violence and the Making of a Muslim "Other" (Zed Books).

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2017
5 p.m.
“Mass Violence in a Changing Myanmar”
CGIS South, Tsai Auditorium

Since late August more than half a million Rohingya Muslims have left their homes in western Myanmar, in what the UN describes as “a textbook case of ethnic cleansing.” The panel members have all undertaken extensive research on the ground in western Myanmar and explored what factors have motivated the violence and why there appears to be mass support among the Myanmar public for the military’s campaign against the Rohingya.

Panelists:

  • Mohammad Mustak Arif, founder, Rohingya Society of Greater Nashua (RSGN)
  • Kyaw Hsan Hlaing, founder and executive director, the Peace and Development Initiative (Kintha) in Rakhine State, Burma
  • Francis Wade, journalist; author, Myanmar’s Enemy Within: Buddhist Violence and the Making of a Muslim “Other” (Zed Books, 2017)
  • Moderator: Kate Cronin-Furman, postdoctoral research fellow, International Security Program, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Cosponsored by the Lakshmi Mittal South Asia Institute, Harvard University Asia Center, and the Academic Ventures Program at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2017
*Open only to Harvard undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows*
“Create, Heal, Reflect”

Student creative seminar, facilitated by Jason Butler, registered drama therapist; associate professor, Lesley University

Cosponsored by the Harvard College Trans Task Force and the Academic Ventures Program at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2018
*Open only to Harvard undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows*
Student Lunch with Viet Thanh Nguyen

Part of the Academic Ventures student lunch series, this lunch provided an opportunity for students to discuss issues related to writing and identity with Viet Thanh Nguyen, author of the Pulitzer Prize–winning The Sympathizer (Grove Press, 2015) and of The Refugees (Grove Press, 2017) and the Aerol Arnold Chair of English and a professor of English and American studies and ethnicity at the University of Southern California.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2018
4:15 p.m.
History, Identity, Politics, and the Art of Writing
2017–2018 Dean’s Lecture in the Humanities
Knafel Center, Radcliffe Institute

What are the challenges for writers concerned with history, identity, and politics? How do writers respond to these themes in language, form, and story? Viet Thanh Nguyen RI ’09 offered some answers through an exploration of his writing and criticism. His remarks were followed by a discussion with the writer Gish Jen ’77, BI ’87, RI ’02.

The video is available here.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018
5 p.m.
Talk by Lisa Brooks, Author of Our Beloved Kin: A New History of King Philip’s War
Barker Center, Thompson Room

Lisa Brooks is an associate professor of English and American studies at Amherst College. She is the author of The Common Pot: The Recovery of Native Space in the Northeast (University of Minnesota Press, 2008). In this lecture, she discussed her new book, Our Beloved Kin: A New History of King Philip’s War (Yale University Press, 2018). With rigorous original scholarship and creative narration, Brooks recovers a complex picture of war, captivity, and Native resistance during the “First Indian War” (later named King Philip’s War) by relaying the stories of Weetamoo, a female Wampanoag leader, and James Printer, a Nipmuc scholar, whose stories converge in the captivity of Mary Rowlandson. Through both a narrow focus on Weetamoo, Printer, and their network of relations and a far broader scope that includes vast Indigenous geographies, Brooks leads us to a new understanding of the history of colonial New England and of American origins. Her pathbreaking scholarship is grounded not just in extensive archival research but also in the land and communities of Native New England, reading the actions of actors during the 17th century alongside an analysis of the landscape and interpretations informed by tribal history.

Cosponsored by the Harvard University Native American Program, the Committee on Ethnicity, Migration, Rights, the Mahindra Humanities Center, and the Academic Ventures Program at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018
4:15 p.m.
The Racial Imaginary and American Poetry
2017–2018 Kim and Judy Davis Dean’s Lecture
Knafel Center, Radcliffe Institute

Claudia Rankine reads from her award-winning book, Citizen: An American Lyric (Graywolf Press, 2014), and discusses how racial imaginaries assert themselves in the history of American poetry.

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2018
4:15 p.m.
Citizen Indigenous
Knafel Center, Radcliffe Institute

Leading members from the Oneida Nation, Citizen Potawatomi Nation, and United Houma Nation of Louisiana discussed vital issues of tribal citizenship in Indian Country. By exploring topics such as constitutional reform, tribal enrollment, blood quantum, and descendancy, the speakers explored the many different ways Native tribes and nations define, grant, and express indigenous citizenship.

Cosponsored by the Harvard University Native American Program, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development’s Honoring Nations Program, and the Academic Ventures Program at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

The video is available here.

THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018
4:15 p.m.
WHEREAS: A Poetry Reading and Discussion with Layli Long Soldier
Knafel Center, Radcliffe Institute

Layli Long Soldier holds a BFA in creative writing from the Institute of American Indian Arts and an MFA from Bard College. Her poems have appeared in the American Indian Journal of Culture and Research, American Poets, BOMB, the Brooklyn Rail, Eleven Eleven, KR Online, Mud City, the New York Times, PEN America, and Poetry, among others. She is a recipient of a Lannan Literary Fellowship, a National Artist Fellowship from the Native Arts & Culture Foundation, and a Whiting Award, and she was a finalist for a 2017 National Book Award. She is the author of WHEREAS (Graywolf Press, 2017) and Chromosomory (Q Ave Press, 2010). She resides in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Long Soldier was introduced and moderated by Nick Estes, a fellow at the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History at Harvard University and cofounder of the Red Nation, a Native-led political organization committed to revitalizing indigenous kinship and combating anti-indigenous violence in all of its manifestations.

Cosponsored by the Harvard University Native American Program and the Academic Ventures Program at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

The video is available here.


FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2018
4:00 p.m.
“Centering the Voices of Indigenous Women: Self-Determination and Decolonization through Literature, Scholarship, and Action”
Piper Auditorium, Gund Hall, Harvard Graduate School of Design

The genesis of this event was part of a response to a troubling review of Terese Mailhot’s book, Heart Berries, published by the Harvard Crimson, which dismissed the author’s execution as “amateur.” This review appeared on February 14, 2018—a day that coincided with events commemorating missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls worldwide. In an effort to further educate members of the Harvard community on the current context and treatment of Native American and Indigenous peoples across the United States and Canada, this event sought to center the voices of influential Indigenous women by addressing a broad range of topics, including systemic racism, social injustice, erasure, and exclusion, as well as to provide suggestions and opportunities to promote change.

Panelists:

  • Erica Violet Lee, graduate student in social justice education, University of Toronto; Indigenous feminist; and community organizer, inner-city Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
  • Emily Riddle, graduate student in political science, University of British Columbia
  • Kim TallBear, associate professor of native studies, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment, University of Alberta
  • Moderator: Adrienne Keene, assistant professor of American studies and ethnic studies, Brown University
  • Introduced by Nick Estes, fellow, Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History, Harvard University; cofounder, the Red Nation

Cosponsored by the Canada Program at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, the Harvard University Native American Program, the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and the Academic Ventures Program at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

TUESDAY, APRIL 3, 2018
12:00 p.m.
Citizenship of the Outcastes
61 Kirkland Street

The panel discussed conceptions of “citizenships” in India as related to caste and indigeneity. The discussion was an opportunity to explore the ways that citizenship and belonging have been constructed through exclusion and marginalization based on social, political, economic, and ethnic lines.

Panelists:

  • Rajyashri Goody, visiting artist, Lakshmi Mittal South Asia Institute, Harvard University
  • Suraj Yengde, W.E.B. Du Bois Nonresident Fellow, Hutchins Center for African and African American Research, and research associate, Department of African and African American Studies, Harvard University
  • Raile Rocky Ziipao, Arvind Raghunathan and Sribala Subramanian South Asia Visiting Fellow, Lakshmi Mittal South Asia Institute, Harvard University

Cosponsored by the Lakshmi Mittal South Asia Institute and the Academic Ventures Program at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2018
2:00 p.m.
“Exploring the Sounds of Kendall Square with Erica Walker”
Kendall Square, Cambridge MA

The Kendall Square neighborhood, which is dubbed the most innovative square mile on the planet, is home to a myriad of entrepreneurial startups, research laboratories, restaurants, and residences. Its unique mix of industrial, commercial, residential, and educational land uses create an interesting aural experience. The focus of the walk is to listen, discuss, and document the neighborhood’s sounds using the NoiseScore smartphone application developed by Erica Walker and funded, in part, by the Academic Ventures Program at Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

Erica Walker is an environmental exposure scientist with research interests in community noise. Her primary work involves developing exposure metrics to better predict how community noise impacts human health. She is also dedicated to translating her research into a series of community noise advocacy tools. Walker has measured the sound levels and noise perception extensively in the Greater Boston Area and has documented her work via Noiseandthecity.org. Last year, she released Greater Boston’s first ever interactive community noise report (boston.noiseandthecity.org) and recently released NoiseScoreTM, a smartphone application funded, in part, by the Academic Ventures Program at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. NoiseScore allows users to objectively and subjectively describe their environmental soundscape and map their responses in real time. Walker holds a master’s degree in environmental economics and urban planning from Tufts University and a doctorate in environmental health from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2018
*Open only to Harvard undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows*
“More than a Status: The Lived Experiences of Refugee Students”

A conversation with Tito Yak about his life as a refugee in Kenya and his transition to American life and Harvard, the program offers an opportunity to go beyond labels and legal categories and to explore the challenges of being a refugee today.

Speakers:

  • Tito Yak, Sudanese refugee, Harvard Class of 2021,
  • Danilo Mandić, Harvard College Fellow, lecturer on sociology, Harvard University

Cosponsored by the Harvard Center for African Studies and the Academic Ventures Program at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2018

5:30 p.m.
“Hasidic Communities, Rights, and Citizenship: Shulem Deen and Meira Levinson in Conversation”
Harvard Hillel

The prize-winning author Shulem Deen and Professor Meira Levinson address the tensions between ultra-conservative communities and the secular world. With growing concerns that many Yeshivas do not offer sufficient English or math education, complex questions about citizenship and rights—educational, educational, parental, and religious—emerge.

Speakers:

  • Shulem Deen, writer, journalist, and author of All Who Go Do Not Return (Graywolf Press, 2015); board member, Footsteps, an organization that assists formerly ultra-Orthodox Jews transition to secular life
  • Meira Levinson, professor of education, Harvard Graduate School of Education

Cosponsored by Harvard Hillel, Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, EdJEWcate, HLS Homelessness Coalition, Progressive Student Alliance at HLS, and the Academic Ventures Program at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

Register to attend here.

FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 2018
7:00 p.m.
Red Sox Nation: Exploring Sports and Citizenship
Knafel Center, Radcliffe Institute

Sports and community identity are deeply linked. What happens on the field and in the stands draws attention to larger issues confronting society and compels athletes and teams to think about their roles and responsibilities in their communities.

As the 2018 Major League Baseball season gets under way, Boston Red Sox executives and a former player will discuss how the Red Sox organization endeavors to engage with the community and to support good citizenship by the team and all of Red Sox Nation.

Cosponsored by WBUR and the Academic Ventures Program at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study


Exploratory Seminars & Accelerator Workshops Related to Citizenship


“Urban Space and Democratic Citizenship”
Exploratory Seminar
Ryan Enos

“Centuries of Struggle: Women, the Vote, and American Citizenship”
Exploratory Seminar
Jane Kamensky and Susan Ware

“The Human Rights Accountability Index”
Accelerator Workshop
Phuong Pham and Patrick Vinck

“URBAN PEACESCAPE: Can Cities Be Built for Peace?”
Exploratory Seminar
Patrick Vinck and Stephen Gray

“When Art Becomes a Civic Gesture”
Exploratory Seminar
Lamia Joreige & Tania Bruguera

“What Works to Reduce Discrimination?”
Exploratory Seminar
Devah Pager and David Pedulla

“Creating a Living Archive of Shared Humanity: FMB Library / Database of Remembrance and Human Rights”
Exploratory Seminar
Ben Miller and Irmtrud Wojak

“The Four Publics Project: Possibilities for Learning in Socially-Engaged, Public Participatory, and Civic Art Forms”
Accelerator Workshop
Karen Brennan & Steven Seidel

“The Ethical Responsibilities of Universities”
Accelerator Workshop
Julie Reuben  

“Accessible Technology and the Developing World”
Advanced Seminar
Jonathan Lazar & Michael Stein