Exhibitions, Lectures

Pulsatility and the Search for Life

Signaling across the Arts and Sciences
Pulsatility and the Search for Life

Pulsation permeates the universe at every scale, from heartbeats to pulsars. As a mode of broadcasting energy and matter, it generates beats and frequencies that have shaped the history of science and culture, acting as beacons for measurement, observation, interpretation, way finding, and expression.

Join us for a conversation between the artist Dario Robleto and the astrophysicist Abraham (Avi) Loeb, both of whom engage deeply with pulsatility in their work. Inspired by the role of pulsatility in signaling and communication, this conversation will also serve as an experiment in cross-disciplinary signaling, testing the potential for the arts and sciences to explore a common set of understandings.


Free and open to the public. Registration is required.

We welcome and encourage students (of all levels and institutions) to attend our events. If you are a student, click here to register.

All other attendees, click here to register.


Speakers:

Dario Robleto, Exhibiting Artist and Visiting Scholar, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University

Abraham (Avi) Loeb, Frank B. Baird Jr. Professor of Science and Chair of the Department of Astronomy, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

Moderated by Jennifer L. Roberts, Johnson-Kulukundis Family Faculty Director of the Arts at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and Elizabeth Cary Agassiz Professor of the Humanities in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University


Related Event:

On Friday, November 8, 2019, the Harvard Art Museums will host an Arts Study Center Seminar, "Dario Robleto: Witnessing Sound" at 32 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA, at 11 a.m.

In this seminar, presented in conjunction with the exhibition Winslow Homer: Eyewitness, Robleto will explore the theme of “witnessing” as it relates to auditory and material forms of war testimony. He will present his research on a rare and little-known audio recording made during a battle in Lille, France, in 1918, toward the end of World War I. It is the first live audio recording ever made on a battlefield.