The redeveloped Government Center, Boston, 1971, and surrounding private buildings. Photo courtesy of Pei Cobb Freed & PartnersThe redeveloped Government Center, Boston, 1971, and surrounding private buildings. Photo courtesy of Pei Cobb Freed & Partners

Toward the Negotiated City

Lizabeth Cohen, dean emerita of the Radcliffe Institute, presents a history of postwar city building in her new book, Saving America's Cities: Ed Logue and the Struggle to Renew Urban America in the Suburban Age.

Courtesy of Wyss Institute at Harvard UniversityCourtesy of Wyss Institute at Harvard University

A Gentle Grip on Gelatinous Creatures

To study jellyfish and other fragile marine life without damaging them, researchers at the Wyss Institute and David Gruber RI '18 developed an ultra-soft gripper to gently grasp jellyfish and release them without harm.

Photo by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff PhotographerPhoto by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff Photographer

Research and Everyday Life

This summer, Ciara Hervás '21 is collecting historical data on black women’s suffrage organizations for a digital data hub called the Suffrage Portal, part of the Radcliffe Institute's Long 19th Amendment project.

Snowball. Photo by Irena SchulzSnowball. Photo by Irena Schulz

So You Think He Can Dance?

Ani Patel RI '19 and his collaborators tracked YouTube sensation Snowball the dancing cockatoo's moves as he boogied to songs by Cyndi Lauper and Queen. The study suggests that humans may not be the only ones who can groove to a beat.

Toni Morrison in 2007. Photo by Tony RinaldoToni Morrison in 2007. Photo by Tony Rinaldo

Radcliffe Mourns the Writer and Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison

Toni Morrison, the first African American woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, is an inspiration to many here at the Institute. She delivered the marquee lecture celebrating the founding of the Radcliffe Institute in 2001, and we honored her with the Radcliffe Medal in 2007.

Toni Stone. Photo courtesy of the Negro Leagues Baseball MuseumToni Stone. Photo courtesy of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum

A Literary Home Run Helped Toni Stone, Baseball's First Woman Player, Find a Stage of Her Own

Martha Ackmann RI '09 speaks with ESPN about Toni Stone—the first woman ever to play big-league professional baseball—whose story is now an off-Broadway play by Lydia R. Diamond RI '13.

Jana Prikryl, author of No Matter, Crown/Archetype. Photo by Juliana Sohn/Willy SommaJana Prikryl, author of No Matter, Crown/Archetype. Photo by Juliana Sohn/Willy Somma

Jana Prikryl on Creating Home in Poetry, Even in Trump’s America

Jana Prikryl RI '19 speaks with the Toronto Star about her newest collection, No Matter, "the kind of poetry to read while watching empires tear themselves apart."

Radcliffe scholar Tuna ?are-A?t?rk is writing a book on the history of Nicomedia as the forerunner of Constantinople. Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerRadcliffe scholar Tuna ?are-A?t?rk is writing a book on the history of Nicomedia as the forerunner of Constantinople. Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

Uncovering an Ancient World

Radcliffe fellow Tuna Şare-Ağtürk heads a team helping to preserve the ancient city of Nicomedia in modern-day Turkey.

Dolores Huerta (center) is given a standing ovation from the audience. Photo by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerDolores Huerta (center) is given a standing ovation from the audience. Photo by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer

Dolores Huerta Receives Radcliffe Medal

The Institute honors the labor and civil rights activist for her six decades of fighting for marginalized peoples and communities.

Adele Woodmansee, a three-time Radcliffe Research Partner, will graduate with a joint concentration in integrative biology and social anthropology. Photo by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerAdele Woodmansee, a three-time Radcliffe Research Partner, will graduate with a joint concentration in integrative biology and social anthropology. Photo by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer

Arriving Self-Sufficient, Leaving Prepared

On historical trails, trailblazing research, languages, and music, three-time Radcliffe Research Partner Adele Woodmansee '19 makes her way with confidence.

Former Radcliffe fellow Julie Orringer wrote a novel about Varian Fry '30, who helped save Jewish artists, writers, and musicians, from the Holocaust. Photo by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff PhotographerFormer Radcliffe fellow Julie Orringer wrote a novel about Varian Fry '30, who helped save Jewish artists, writers, and musicians, from the Holocaust. Photo by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff Photographer

The "American Schindler"

Julie Orringer's new novel, The Flight Portfolio—which she worked on while a fellow at Radcliffe—focuses on Varian Fry, a Harvard grad who saved Jewish artists during World War II.

Bridget Terry Long (from left), Claudine Gay, and Tomiko Brown-Nagin meet in Fay House. Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer Bridget Terry Long (from left), Claudine Gay, and Tomiko Brown-Nagin meet in Fay House. Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

Four Deans, and Their Journeys

In a group interview, Tomiko Brown-Nagin, Claudine Gay, Bridget Terry Long, and Michelle Williams recall role models and describe the complexities of leading their schools at Harvard.

Byerly Hall, Radcliffe Yard. Photo by Kevin Grady/Radcliffe InstituteByerly Hall, Radcliffe Yard. Photo by Kevin Grady/Radcliffe Institute

Radcliffe Institute Announces 2019–2020 Fellowship Class

The scholars, artists, scientists, and practitioners who comprise the incoming class of fellows will direct their creative and intellectual energy to addressing some of the most complex and urgent challenges of our time.

Panelists Carrie Mae Weems (from left), Sarah Lewis, and David Adjaye share a laugh onstage at the "Vision & Justice" conference. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerPanelists Carrie Mae Weems (from left), Sarah Lewis, and David Adjaye share a laugh onstage at the "Vision & Justice" conference. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

"The Work of Culture Alters Our Perceptions"

Radcliffe conference explores the nexus of race and justice through art.

Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerPhoto by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

Rethinking Inclusion

Radcliffe Professor Anthony Jack talks about his new book, The Privileged Poor, which addresses the struggles of low-income students at elite schools.

Pediatric oncologist Lisa Diller is studying the implications of genetic testing in newborns. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerPediatric oncologist Lisa Diller is studying the implications of genetic testing in newborns. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer

DNA Testing Could Save Young Lives through Early Intervention

Pediatric oncologist Lisa Diller RI '19 is studying the implications of genetic testing in newborns.

Carmen Yulin Cruz, mayor of San Juan, Puerto Rico, speaks at a Radcliffe conference about citizenship. Photo by Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerCarmen Yulin Cruz, mayor of San Juan, Puerto Rico, speaks at a Radcliffe conference about citizenship. Photo by Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer

Citizens Arrested

San Juan mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz spoke at Radcliffe's "Unsettled Citizens" conference about how Puerto Ricans are US citizens but are not treated equally.

Photo credit: GGAADDPhoto credit: GGAADD

The Challenge of Preserving the Historical Record of #MeToo

Evidence of the #MeToo movement should be preserved, both because it matters and because it could disappear. But archivists face a battery of technical and ethical questions with few precedents.

Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerPhoto by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

Author: If at First You Don’t Succeed, Fail, Fail Again

As any writer will tell you, the process of writing is riddled with anguish, angst, and the ever-popular procrastination. For Lauren Groff RI '19, it’s also filled with productive failure.

Photo by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerPhoto by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer

Researching and Writing History

“It didn’t occur to me that a person of my background could be a writer,” said Min Jin Lee RI '19. “I didn’t know anyone from my background who was one.”

Mark (left) and Scott Kelly participated in the NASA Twins Study, which focused on the strain of spaceflight on the human body. Scott spent a year in space while Mark remained on Earth. Photo by Robert Markowoto/NASAMark (left) and Scott Kelly participated in the NASA Twins Study, which focused on the strain of spaceflight on the human body. Scott spent a year in space while Mark remained on Earth. Photo by Robert Markowoto/NASA

Twins in Space

Brinda Rana—member of a NASA-sponsored research team examining what happens to astronauts during prolonged space flights—shared how zero gravity affects the body.

Daniel M. Kammen speaking at Radcliffe's Knafel Center. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerDaniel M. Kammen speaking at Radcliffe's Knafel Center. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer

To Tackle Climate Change, Share Burden—and Benefits

Even as climate change reaches new and terrifying levels, hope remains—but the time to act is now, says Daniel M. Kammen.

Harvard file photoHarvard file photo

Radcliffe Scholar Tracks Squirrels in Search of Memory Gains

Lucia Jacobs RI '19 is exploring squirrel brains, particularly how the animals cache and retrieve their food and what happens in the memory-associated hippocampus during that process.

Photo by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff PhotographerPhoto by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff Photographer

Engaging Radcliffe with the World

Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin emphasizes Radcliffe’s role as a place for members of the Harvard community to convene and collaborate with one another.