The opening session of the Radcliffe Institute conference "Beyond Words: Gender and the Aesthetics of Communication" included live drag acts. Photo by Nuriya SaifulinaThe opening session of the Radcliffe Institute conference "Beyond Words: Gender and the Aesthetics of Communication" included live drag acts. Photo by Nuriya Saifulina

The Kings and Queens of Radcliffe

“Communication Can Be a . . . Drag” provided a fitting and “playful” introduction to a conference meant to examine gender expression.

Susan Bennett is the voice of Siri. Photo by Kevin Grady/Radcliffe InstituteSusan Bennett is the voice of Siri. Photo by Kevin Grady/Radcliffe Institute

"Siri, Who Provided Your Voice?"

In a day of discussions devoted to how humans use their bodies to communicate, the original voice of Siri shared her experience as the sound of Apple iPhone’s virtual assistant.

Photo by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerPhoto by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer

Researching and Writing History

“It didn’t occur to me that a person of my background could be a writer,” said Min Jin Lee RI '19. “I didn’t know anyone from my background who was one.”

Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

Why Are Teachers Protesting in "Blue" Cities?

Sarah Reckhow RI '19 and collaborators explain how deep-pocketed national donors are changing local school politics.

Mark (left) and Scott Kelly participated in the NASA Twins Study, which focused on the strain of spaceflight on the human body. Scott spent a year in space while Mark remained on Earth. Photo by Robert Markowoto/NASAMark (left) and Scott Kelly participated in the NASA Twins Study, which focused on the strain of spaceflight on the human body. Scott spent a year in space while Mark remained on Earth. Photo by Robert Markowoto/NASA

Twins in Space

Brinda Rana—member of a NASA-sponsored research team examining what happens to astronauts during prolonged space flights—shared how zero gravity affects the body.

Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

A Surprising Blend of Poetry, Sci-Fi, and "Bloom County"

Poet Evie Shockley RI '19 speaks to the Boston Globe about her favorite books and sources of literary inspiration.

Courtesy of the Dolores Huerta FoundationCourtesy of the Dolores Huerta Foundation

Dolores Huerta to Receive Radcliffe Medal for Her Impact on Society

“Every American should know her name and her decades-long work to secure the rights of farmworkers, women, and other disadvantaged people,” said Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin.

Daniel M. Kammen speaking at Radcliffe's Knafel Center. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerDaniel M. Kammen speaking at Radcliffe's Knafel Center. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer

To Tackle Climate Change, Share Burden—and Benefits

Even as climate change reaches new and terrifying levels, hope remains—but the time to act is now, says Daniel M. Kammen.

The artwork, "Love and Revolution,"  revolutionary graffiti at Saleh Selim Street on the island of Zamalek, Cairo, was photographed by Hossam el-Hamalawy on Oct. 23, 2011.The artwork, "Love and Revolution," revolutionary graffiti at Saleh Selim Street on the island of Zamalek, Cairo, was photographed by Hossam el-Hamalawy on Oct. 23, 2011.

Nonviolent Resistance Proves Potent Weapon

Radcliffe Professor Erica Chenoweth's research suggests that nonviolent civil resistance is far more successful in creating broad-based change than violent campaigns.

Harvard file photoHarvard file photo

Radcliffe Scholar Tracks Squirrels in Search of Memory Gains

Lucia Jacobs RI '19 will spend part of her time at Radcliffe exploring squirrel brains, particularly how the animals cache and retrieve their food and what happens in the memory-associated hippocampus during that process

Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

When Science Is Unreliable

Nicole C. Nelson RI '19 delves into the scientific reproducibility crisis, a recent phenomenon in which subsequent scientific investigation has found many supposedly stable findings to be difficult to replicate.

Harvard's Schlesinger Library is digitizing its collection of handwritten cookbooks, including a notebook kept by famed chef Dione Lucas likely during the 1930s. Courtesy of Schlesinger LibraryHarvard's Schlesinger Library is digitizing its collection of handwritten cookbooks, including a notebook kept by famed chef Dione Lucas likely during the 1930s. Courtesy of Schlesinger Library

As Recipe Cards Disappear, Families Scramble to Preserve Cherished Memories

The internet is making paper recipes obsolete, but many modern cooks see the cards as tangible mementos of favorite foods and the beloved cooks who made them over and over again.

Courtesy of Clarissa TossinCourtesy of Clarissa Tossin

Radcliffe Institute at Harvard presents Future Fossil, a newly commissioned exhibition by Clarissa Tossin, inspired by Octavia Butler’s Xenogenesis trilogy.

The artworks in this exhibition imagine a moment of collision of the past, present, and future. Clarissa Tossin explains, “In the course of making this work, I’ve wondered what a core sample of Earth taken 1,000 years from now will look like.”

Asma Khalid, a political reporter for NPR, introduces panelists at an event discussing the 2018 midterm elections Tuesday afternoon in the Knafel Center at the Radcliffe Institute. Photo: Kathryn S. KuharAsma Khalid, a political reporter for NPR, introduces panelists at an event discussing the 2018 midterm elections Tuesday afternoon in the Knafel Center at the Radcliffe Institute. Photo: Kathryn S. Kuhar

Radcliffe Institute Panel Unpacks 2018 Midterm Election

Panelists from academic, political organizing, and consulting backgrounds discussed the unprecedented number of female candidates in this year’s midterm elections.

Earth's night lights seen from the International Space Station. Photo courtesy of NASAEarth's night lights seen from the International Space Station. Photo courtesy of NASA

Is Anybody Out There?

SETI astronomer Jill Tarter—who was among the speakers at this year’s Radcliffe science symposium, “The Undiscovered”—on the search for intelligent life.

Photo by Kristin KozelskyPhoto by Kristin Kozelsky

Chasing after the Weird and the Wild

The Boston Globe speaks with writer Lauren Groff RI '19, who will work on a new novel during her Radcliffe fellowship. 

Photo by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff PhotographerPhoto by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff Photographer

Engaging Radcliffe with the World

Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin emphasizes Radcliffe’s role as a place for members of the Harvard community to convene and collaborate with one another. 

Anna Von Mertens' cosmic quilts are on view at Byerly Hall through Jan. 19. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerAnna Von Mertens' cosmic quilts are on view at Byerly Hall through Jan. 19. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer

Stitching Together the Stars

Henrietta Leavitt's countless hours at Harvard mapping the stars are central to understanding the universe. The exhibit Measure shows how her efforts helped unlock mysteries of the cosmos. 

The Schlesinger Library building will remain closed for renovations from November 2018 through early September 2019. Photo: Quinn G. PeriniThe Schlesinger Library building will remain closed for renovations from November 2018 through early September 2019. Photo: Quinn G. Perini

Harvard Radcliffe Institute Renovating Schlesinger Library to Increase Use of Collections

The project involves exterior and interior renovations, including building an enlarged exhibit space and a “technology-enhanced” seminar room. Researchers can access the collection via a temporary reading room in Fay House.

NPR reporter Ofeibea Quist-Arcton (right), with Marco Werman from PRI's "The World," delivered the Rama S. Mehta Lecture at Radcliffe. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerNPR reporter Ofeibea Quist-Arcton (right), with Marco Werman from PRI's "The World," delivered the Rama S. Mehta Lecture at Radcliffe. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer

Straight to the Heart of the Story

NPR’s Ofeibea Quist-Arcton speaks at Radcliffe on seeking the untold narratives of African women.

Reginald Dwayne Betts while he was a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute in 2011-2012. Photo by Jessica ScrantonReginald Dwayne Betts while he was a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute in 2011-2012. Photo by Jessica Scranton

Could an Ex-Convict Become an Attorney? I Intended to Find Out

Reginald Dwayne Betts RI '12 writes: "After serving time for a crime I committed at 16, I discovered how hard it is for a felon to get a second chance."

Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerPhoto by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

Uncovering the Economics of Foot-Binding

Foot-binding ended 100 years ago and people have long assumed that its demise was due to reform-minded efforts. But a study by Harvard's Melissa Brown RI '12 raises questions about that assumption.

Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerPhoto by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

The Serious Business of Comics

The world is full of visual stimuli. And the way we experience them isn’t just the stuff of comic book art, but the essence of life itself, according to Scott McCloud.

Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerPhoto by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer

Behind an Eerie Sound, Science, Espionage, and Dashed Dreams

Composer, musicologist, and theremin player Dorit Chrysler set history to sound, without the slightest touch, in a presentation with physicist John Huth.

Radcliffe Institute Panelists Discuss Contemporary Feminism

“Feminisms Now!” featured a panel of five millennial feminist activists, artists, and writers who discussed the "intersectional" nature of 21st century feminism.