Chanan Tigay during his talk at Radcliffe. Photo by Kevin Grady/Radcliffe InstituteChanan Tigay during his talk at Radcliffe. Photo by Kevin Grady/Radcliffe Institute

The Hunt for a Lost Book of Moses

Radcliffe scholar Chanan Tigay tried to track down what could be a forgery, or the oldest Bible in the world.

"As a scholar of law, inequality, and the long Civil Rights movement, I am deeply interested in issues related to slavery and its legacy," said Tomiko Brown-Nagin, who will lead the committee. Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer"As a scholar of law, inequality, and the long Civil Rights movement, I am deeply interested in issues related to slavery and its legacy," said Tomiko Brown-Nagin, who will lead the committee. Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

A Renewed Focus on Slavery

A new University-wide initiative deepening the exploration of Harvard’s historical ties to enslavement is difficult but vital work, says the program chair, Radcliffe Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin.

Photo of Angela Davis' class at Claremont College, 1975 (detail). Courtesy of Schlesinger LibraryPhoto of Angela Davis' class at Claremont College, 1975 (detail). Courtesy of Schlesinger Library

Angela Davis in Black and White and Gray

A new exhibit at Radcliffe, curated from Angela Davis' personal archive, chronicles the life of a complicated activist and scholar.

Reviewers have praised Chaya Czernowin's opera, "Heart Chamber," describing it as "overwhelming and touching in an unfamiliar way." Czernowin is the Rieman and Baketel Fellow for Music at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Photo by Christopher McIntoshReviewers have praised Chaya Czernowin's opera, "Heart Chamber," describing it as "overwhelming and touching in an unfamiliar way." Czernowin is the Rieman and Baketel Fellow for Music at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Photo by Christopher McIntosh

Giving Voice to the Heart

A new opera by Harvard professor Chaya Czernowin RI '20 voices the conflicted inner thoughts of a couple falling in love.

 Christina Warinner, who was recently appointed assistant professor of anthropology, considers calcified plaque a DNA "time capsule." Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer Christina Warinner, who was recently appointed assistant professor of anthropology, considers calcified plaque a DNA "time capsule." Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

The Archaeology of Plaque (Yes, Plaque)

Radcliffe Professor Christina Warinner says studying ancient teeth offers insights into diets, disease, dairying, and women’s roles.

15 Reading Recommendations from Radcliffe’s 2019–2020 Fellows

A selection of 2019–2020 Radcliffe fellows share books that inspired their research, activated their imaginations, and sparked their enjoyment. 

Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

Radcliffe Fellow Talks Technological Advancement, Privacy, and Ethics

Computer scientist Francine Berman RI '20 discussed the need for data policy that promotes the public good and protects consumer security.

 Shawon Kinew leads a first-year seminar where students study portraits of indigenous American leaders to learn about art, identity, and the history of indigenous peoples. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer Shawon Kinew leads a first-year seminar where students study portraits of indigenous American leaders to learn about art, identity, and the history of indigenous peoples. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer

Art and the History of Indigenous America

Radcliffe Professor Shawon Kinew's first-year Harvard College seminar focuses on the 19th century oil portraits of 25 Native leaders captured in an era of forced relocation.

Radcliffe Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin has a new strategic initiative to connect with Harvard and the community beyond Harvard's gates. Rose Lincoln/Harvard file photoRadcliffe Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin has a new strategic initiative to connect with Harvard and the community beyond Harvard's gates. Rose Lincoln/Harvard file photo

Brown-Nagin on Her Own Path and Radcliffe’s

Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin discusses her priorities for Harvard’s institute devoted to interdisciplinary study and research.

Photo by Stephen Foster/UnsplashPhoto by Stephen Foster/Unsplash

Brokering an Opioid Settlement

Alexandra D. Lahav RI '20 discusses how global settlements of thousands of lawsuits against drug companies and distributors by those ravaged by the opioid epidemic operate.

"When I saved all the material I had no way in imagining that it would culminate in something like this," said Angela Davis, adding, "I just knew that I shouldn't throw it away." Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer"When I saved all the material I had no way in imagining that it would culminate in something like this," said Angela Davis, adding, "I just knew that I shouldn't throw it away." Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

Angela Davis Looks Back

The iconic scholar and activist reflects on her life's work and why she remains inspired at a Radcliffe conference celebrating the acquisition of her archive.

Among those at Radcliffe's event, "Making the Cut: Promises and Challenges of Gene Editing," were Charmaine Royal of Duke University (from left), Sylvain Moineau of the Universite Laval, and Jonathan Kimmelman of McGill University. Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerAmong those at Radcliffe's event, "Making the Cut: Promises and Challenges of Gene Editing," were Charmaine Royal of Duke University (from left), Sylvain Moineau of the Universite Laval, and Jonathan Kimmelman of McGill University. Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

Power and Pitfalls of Gene Editing

With thousands of new academic papers on CRISPR science publishing each year, experts examined the rapidly advancing technology at Radcliffe's "Making the Cut" symposium.

Judy Chicago. Photo by Steve S. LiJudy Chicago. Photo by Steve S. Li

A Feminist Intervention into Art

Judy Chicago has spent her life working to write women into history, and now she is trying to ensure that her carefully documented work of the past sixty years does not disappear.

At a recent Radcliffe talk, biographers Robert Reid-Pharr (from left), Tomiko Brown-Nagin, and Imani Perry explored how their subjects helped shape conversations around black politics, community, identity, and life. Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerAt a recent Radcliffe talk, biographers Robert Reid-Pharr (from left), Tomiko Brown-Nagin, and Imani Perry explored how their subjects helped shape conversations around black politics, community, identity, and life. Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

Writing Black Lives

At a recent Radcliffe talk, biographers Robert Reid-Pharr, Tomiko Brown-Nagin, and Imani Perry explored how their subjects helped shape conversations around black politics, community, identity, and life.

Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

Radcliffe Institute Mourns Judith Vichniac, Who Led the Radcliffe Fellowship Program from 2001 to 2018

The founding director of the Radcliffe Fellowship Program passed away on October 22. She had a profound impact on the lives and careers of hundreds of fellows over the years.

Photo courtesy of Harvard Public Affairs and CommunicationsPhoto courtesy of Harvard Public Affairs and Communications

Michael Kremer Wins Nobel in Economics

Michael Kremer RI '14 and his MIT collaborators pioneered the use of field experiments to determine the effectiveness of world poverty programs.

Photo by Kevin Grady/Radcliffe InstitutePhoto by Kevin Grady/Radcliffe Institute

Radcliffe Welcomes Boston Students for Justice-Focused Workshop

The Radcliffe Institute was one of seven Boston-area higher education institutions to host Boston Public School students as part of the Summer of HOPE Institute.

Harvard professor and author Lizabeth Cohen at Government Center, in nearly the same spot urban planner Ed Logue was photographed (below) for Newsweek magazine, April 1965. Photo by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerHarvard professor and author Lizabeth Cohen at Government Center, in nearly the same spot urban planner Ed Logue was photographed (below) for Newsweek magazine, April 1965. Photo by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer

Urban Planning and Social Justice

Radcliffe dean emerita and Harvard historian Lizabeth Cohen examines the life and career of Ed Logue, the city planner who was instrumental in helping reshape and revive a number of declining American cities, including Boston, in the postwar era.

Photo by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerPhoto by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer

Thinking Like a Magician

At his Radcliffe talk, magician Joshua Jay demonstrated techniques involving perception, attention, and surprise that he insists have practical applications well beyond the realm of magic.

Original cast of Sesame Street. Photo courtesy of Sesame WorkshopOriginal cast of Sesame Street. Photo courtesy of Sesame Workshop

Everyone’s Favorite Street

Has it really been 50 years of Sesame Street? Radcliffe-affiliated scholars and artists discuss the impact that Sesame Street has had on their lives—and their favorite character.