University of Connecticut Professor Manisha Sinha spoke about African American intellectuals James W.C. Pennington, Frederick Douglass, and William Wells Brown who, she says, often offered ethical and moral arguments against scientific racism. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerUniversity of Connecticut Professor Manisha Sinha spoke about African American intellectuals James W.C. Pennington, Frederick Douglass, and William Wells Brown who, she says, often offered ethical and moral arguments against scientific racism. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer

Exploring the North’s Long History of Slavery, Scientific Racism

Radcliffe webinar exploring the legacy of slavery upends myths of Northern blamelessness.

 Khalil Gibran Muhammad is faculty director of the Institutional Antiracism and Accountability Project. Photo by Martha Stewart Khalil Gibran Muhammad is faculty director of the Institutional Antiracism and Accountability Project. Photo by Martha Stewart

How to Be an Antiracist Nonprofit or Company

Radcliffe Professor Khalil Gibran Muhammad leads Harvard Kennedy School research initiative to look at why diversity and inclusion efforts succeed or fail.

Marilyn Pappas and Jill Slosburg-Ackerman, Accompanied: Two Views of the Sea, 2017-2020. Cotton thread, colored pencil on paper, pine, gouache, 11.5 x 9.5 x 1.5 inches. Courtesy of the artists.Marilyn Pappas and Jill Slosburg-Ackerman, Accompanied: Two Views of the Sea, 2017-2020. Cotton thread, colored pencil on paper, pine, gouache, 11.5 x 9.5 x 1.5 inches. Courtesy of the artists.

Being with the Other

A Radcliffe exhibition explores a lifetime of artwork and female friendship.

The journalist Nikole S. Hannah-Jones spoke at a Radcliffe Institute event Tuesday. Image by Pei Chao ZhuoThe journalist Nikole S. Hannah-Jones spoke at a Radcliffe Institute event Tuesday. Image by Pei Chao Zhuo

Pulitzer Prize-Winner Nikole Hannah-Jones Discusses 1619 Project at Radcliffe Institute Event

The Institute hosted Hannah-Jones as part of the presidential initiative on Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery.

A white stork with a solar GPS tag. Photo by Renate Herz (C)A white stork with a solar GPS tag. Photo by Renate Herz (C)

Where the Wild Things Are—Now That Humans Are Locked Down

Christian Rutz RI '20 and other researchers are examining human impact on wildlife using data collected during the pandemic quarantine.

Photo by Kathryn S. KuharPhoto by Kathryn S. Kuhar

Scholars Discuss 19th Amendment’s Achievements and Shortcomings in Radcliffe Panel

In the third session of “Voting Matters: Gender, Citizenship, and the Long 19th Amendment," speakers discussed topics ranging from voting rights to the lack of representation for women in government and politics.

Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

Statement by Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin in Remembrance of Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be remembered as a champion of equality. Her legacy, however, goes far beyond what she achieved in court. Ginsburg also should be remembered for her resilience.

This fall, Professor Tiya Miles will teach "Abolitionist Women and Their World," a course in public history. Photo by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerThis fall, Professor Tiya Miles will teach "Abolitionist Women and Their World," a course in public history. Photo by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer

Crowd-sourcing the Story of a People

Radcliffe Professor Tiya Miles discusses why she believes a better understanding of the past is as likely to be found in a formal archive, a national park, or a conversation with an elderly relative as it is in the classroom.

A 19th-century engraving of Vampire Bat, Bulldog Bat, and Kalong Bat. Image from duncan1890A 19th-century engraving of Vampire Bat, Bulldog Bat, and Kalong Bat. Image from duncan1890

Summer of X

We asked members of the 2020–2021 fellowship class to introduce themselves by way of a recent preoccupation. Their answers suggest minds rarely at rest, even in summer.

Participants in the weeklong Summer of HOPE workshop shared a "check-out" word at the end of each session.Participants in the weeklong Summer of HOPE workshop shared a "check-out" word at the end of each session.

Social Change Takes Center Stage at 2020 Summer of HOPE

The meaning of justice in health care, the environment, and race relations has been at the center of the national conversation the past several months. These issues informed and animated the Summer of HOPE program at the Radcliffe Institute.

Historic figures who played prominent roles in the fight for equality: Anna Murray-Douglass (ca. 1860) (from left), Marcus Garvey with Amy Jacques Garvey (1922), and Elizabeth Freeman (1812). Source: All images Wikipedia/Public Domain; Freeman photo courtesy of Massachusetts Historical Society, BostonHistoric figures who played prominent roles in the fight for equality: Anna Murray-Douglass (ca. 1860) (from left), Marcus Garvey with Amy Jacques Garvey (1922), and Elizabeth Freeman (1812). Source: All images Wikipedia/Public Domain; Freeman photo courtesy of Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston

Defining a Centennial

Panel discusses what happened in the years before Black women actually got the vote.

Photo by Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerPhoto by Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer

How Caffeine Changed the World

Author Michael Pollan discusses his latest work on the world’s most-used psychoactive substance.

Protesters march against sexual assault and harassment in November 2017 in Hollywood. AP Photo/Damian DovarganesProtesters march against sexual assault and harassment in November 2017 in Hollywood. AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes

Challenge of Archiving the #MeToo Movement

The Schlesinger Library's new online collection contains more than 32 million tweets, 1,100 webpages, and thousands of articles reflecting a range of perspectives.

Photo by Stephen VossPhoto by Stephen Voss

Teaching Children to Be Antiracist

Scholar Ibram X. Kendi, an incoming Radcliffe Institute fellow, talks about his new picture book and how to start conversations about racism with children.

Photo by Matt Popovich/UnsplashPhoto by Matt Popovich/Unsplash

Police Reform in the Spotlight

Radcliffe panel explores the nation’s history of policing, what it will take to overhaul a system seen as rife with misconduct and racism, and how America is failing to live up to its democratic beliefs.

Tomiko Brown-Nagin. Photo by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff PhotographerTomiko Brown-Nagin. Photo by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff Photographer

Equal Justice Requires Lawmakers Reform Qualified Immunity for Police

The degree of clarity that courts require to permit suits for civil rights violations to proceed is excessive to the point of absurdity.

Bunting Institute fellows. Photo by Olive PierceBunting Institute fellows. Photo by Olive Pierce

A Room of One’s Own

The Equivalents follows Anne Sexton, Maxine Kumin, Tillie Olsen, Barbara Swan, and Marianna Pineda through the birth of the Radcliffe Institute and the modern women’s movement.

A roadside sign asks for justice for George Floyd, whose killing by Minneapolis police set off protests worldwide. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard staff photographerA roadside sign asks for justice for George Floyd, whose killing by Minneapolis police set off protests worldwide. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard staff photographer

Facing the Denial of American Racism

The Radcliffe Institute hosted “Naming Racism,” a discussion focused on identifying the historic and ongoing social roots of racism denial, and strategies for raising awareness.

The artwork, "Love and Revolution,"  revolutionary graffiti at Saleh Selim Street on the island of Zamalek, Cairo, was photographed by Hossam el-Hamalawy on Oct. 23, 2011.The artwork, "Love and Revolution," revolutionary graffiti at Saleh Selim Street on the island of Zamalek, Cairo, was photographed by Hossam el-Hamalawy on Oct. 23, 2011.

Nonviolent Resistance Proves Potent Weapon

Radcliffe Professor Erica Chenoweth's research suggests that nonviolent civil resistance is far more successful in creating broad-based change than violent campaigns.

Millions of Americans have lost their jobs in the COVID-19 era. Photo credit RyanKing999Millions of Americans have lost their jobs in the COVID-19 era. Photo credit RyanKing999

An Economic Emergency

“A substantial share of those currently on temporary layoff are likely to become permanent job losers. We need to plan for this,” says Harvard economist Lawrence F. Katz.

A sign at a retailer tells customers they accept SNAP. Image source: jetcityimageA sign at a retailer tells customers they accept SNAP. Image source: jetcityimage

Ideas for Flattening the Hunger Curve

“There is no question that COVID-19 will drive food insecurity into the mainstream,” says Harvard public health policy researcher Sara Bleich.

A single N95 face mask along with several prescription painkillers. Image credit skhowardA single N95 face mask along with several prescription painkillers. Image credit skhoward

Eclipsed by Virus, Addiction Still Shadows the Land

"COVID-19 detrimentally impacts people with addiction and people in pain, making vulnerable people even more vulnerable," says sociologist Liz Chiarello.

Voters observe social distancing guidelines as they wait in line to cast ballots in the presidential primary election in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on April 7, 2020. Image source: AP Photo/Morry Gash FileVoters observe social distancing guidelines as they wait in line to cast ballots in the presidential primary election in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on April 7, 2020. Image source: AP Photo/Morry Gash File

Health of Democracy Faces Daunting Test

Historian Liette Gidlow RI '20 speaks on the tension between in-person voting and public health as American states scramble to adapt during the COVID-19 pandemic.

A deserted 23rd Street, in Manhattan's Flatiron District. Credit: Alex PotemkinA deserted 23rd Street, in Manhattan's Flatiron District. Credit: Alex Potemkin

How to Build a Better World

Esra Akcan RI '20, a professor in Cornell's Department of Architecture, answers questions as part of a series on the wide-ranging effects of COVID-19.

Photo by Orbon AlljaPhoto by Orbon Allja

The Fraught Promise of Digital Remedies

As the COVID-19 pandemic has thrust many of our activities into cyberspace, Fran Berman RI ’20 discusses the need for comprehensive privacy protections, better security standards, and a national discussion about when surveillance is acceptable.

Photo source UnsplashPhoto source Unsplash

In Prisons, a Looming Coronavirus Crisis

Harvard experts, including Radcliffe's Tomiko Brown-Nagin and Kaia Stern, warn of rapid spread in prisons amid crowded conditions and large numbers of older individuals with chronic conditions.

Mary T. Bassett and Khalil Gibran MuhammadMary T. Bassett and Khalil Gibran Muhammad

The Pandemic's Unequal Toll

The Radcliffe Institute hosted an online discussion with Mary T. Bassett and Khalil Gibran Muhammad about the disproportionate toll of COVID-19 on poorer Americans and communities of color.

Photo credit Jonnica Hill/UnsplashPhoto credit Jonnica Hill/Unsplash

COVID-19 Targets Communities of Color

Camara Jones RI '20 and other Harvard specialists say the pandemic exacerbates longstanding inequities in American society.