Eight Reading Recommendations from Radcliffe’s 2020–2021 Fellows

Thursday, December 3, 2020

The 2020–2021 cohort of Radcliffe fellows includes scholars, scientists, artists, writers, and practitioners. Below, a few of them share books that inspired their research, activated their imaginations, and sparked their enjoyment.

These fellows provided reading recommendations as a thank you to Radcliffe’s donors, whose support is critical to advancing the Institute’s people, programs, and research collections.

Making Higher Education Anti-racist

Harvard Gazette
Friday, November 20, 2020
Photo by Stephanie Mitchell, Harvard Staff PhotographerPhoto by Stephanie Mitchell, Harvard Staff Photographer

Radcliffe scholar Ibram X. Kendi discussed possible reforms in admissions and faculty representation, fielding questions from Harvard College students.

Radcliffe Institute Hosts Virtual Panel on Inequalities of Higher Education during COVID-19

The Harvard Crimson
Thursday, November 19, 2020
Photo by fizkesPhoto by fizkes

Radcliffe event focused on how COVID-19 has exacerbated racial and economic inequalities in higher education.

23andMe CEO Discusses Healthcare Transparency and Patients Privacy at Radcliffe Institute Event

The Harvard Crimson
Wednesday, November 18, 2020
Detail image of DNA sequence

Anne E. Wojcicki explained her view of the genetics company’s role in the changing world of healthcare and her beliefs on information privacy and consumer choice.

Does Food Have a Gender?

Harvard Gazette
Tuesday, November 17, 2020
Photo by Jes?s Terr?s/UnsplashPhoto by Jes?s Terr?s/Unsplash

Historian Barbara Haber and chef Lydia Shire discussed how food, whether in the home or professional domain, has long been associated with gender and a range of social and political realities.

Students Advocate for Prison Education at Radcliffe Institute Panel

The Harvard Crimson
Wednesday, November 11, 2020
Image source: Marjorie Kamys Cotera/Bob Daemmrich PhotographyImage source: Marjorie Kamys Cotera/Bob Daemmrich Photography

Students discussed education in prison, education via nontraditional paths, and its potential for combating social ills.

After a Hard Election, the Real Work Begins

Harvard Gazette
Sunday, November 8, 2020
Vice President-elect Kamala Harris and President-elect Joe Biden at Saturday night's event in Wilmington, Del. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, PoolVice President-elect Kamala Harris and President-elect Joe Biden at Saturday night's event in Wilmington, Del. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool

Harvard analysts and affiliates—including Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin—take a look at what the election tells us about the prospects for greater unity and progress, and offer suggestions and predictions about where the new administration will, and should, go.

Hard Lessons from a Tough Election

Harvard Gazette
Thursday, November 5, 2020
Photo by Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerPhoto by Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer

Harvard scholars and analysts—including Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin and past fellows Kenneth Mack, Carol Steiker, and Dan Carpenter—reflect on politics, divisiveness, diversity, and disinformation.

United Nations High-Level Commissioner Talks Women’s Role in Policymaking

The Harvard Crimson
Wednesday, November 4, 2020
Photo courtesy of Alaa MurabitPhoto courtesy of Alaa Murabit

Radcliffe fellow Alaa Murabit says that women involved in conflict resolution are more likely to focus on community needs, especially education and health care.

In a Close Election, Some Black Americans See a Clear Winner: Racism

The Boston Globe
Wednesday, November 4, 2020
Chad L. Williams RI '18. Photo by Tony RinaldoChad L. Williams RI '18. Photo by Tony Rinaldo

Chad Williams RI '18 and Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin spoke to the Boston Globe as some Black voters called the country's failure to decisively reject racist policy and rhetoric "disappointing but not surprising."

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