In Dark Chapter of Harvard’s History, Family Subplots

Students @ Radcliffe
Thursday, July 9, 2020
Courtesy of Mary McNeil

Mary McNeil (Mashpee Wampanoag) is a PhD candidate in Harvard’s American Studies program and a research assistant for the African American Trail Project at Tufts University. With support from the Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery initiative, which is anchored at the Radcliffe Institute, McNeil is examining the University’s connections to the slave trade by tracing its financial links to the enslavement of American Indians.

 

Legal Experts Say Supreme Court Ruling on Trump Financial Records Will Have Far-reaching Effect

The Boston Globe
Thursday, July 9, 2020
Tomiko Brown-Nagin. Photo by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff PhotographerTomiko Brown-Nagin. Photo by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff Photographer

Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin comments on the high court’s decisions regarding the release of the President's tax records.

Police Reform in the Spotlight

Harvard Gazette
Monday, July 6, 2020
Photo by Matt Popovich/UnsplashPhoto by Matt Popovich/Unsplash

Radcliffe panel explores the nation’s history of policing, what it will take to overhaul a system seen as rife with misconduct and racism, and how America is failing to live up to its democratic beliefs.

Much Bigger than the Police

Harvard Magazine
Wednesday, July 1, 2020
Clockwise from top left: Laurence Ralph, Monica Bell, and Brandon TerryClockwise from top left: Laurence Ralph, Monica Bell, and Brandon Terry

“Policing, at present, is trapped in an intractable dilemma caused by the gap between a just society and the one we inhabit,” said Harvard political theorist Brandon Terry, leading off a Radcliffe Institute online conversation on American policing and protest.

"Tom Tom" Takes Its Place in the Operatic Canon

New Frame
Monday, June 29, 2020
Shirley Graham Du Bois in profile, ca. 1945. Photo by Calhoun. Courtesy of Shirley Graham Du Bois Papers, Schlesinger LibraryShirley Graham Du Bois in profile, ca. 1945. Photo by Calhoun. Courtesy of Shirley Graham Du Bois Papers, Schlesinger Library

Shirley Graham Du Bois’ "lost opera" tells the diaspora story of African Americans. Originally performed in 1932, it is being reproduced and restored to its rightful place in history.

‘Juneteenth is a day of reflection of how we as a country and as individuals continue to reckon with slavery’

Harvard Law Today
Thursday, June 18, 2020
An early celebration of Juneteenth in 1900 at Eastwoods Park in Austin, Texas. Credit: Grace Murray Stephenson/Austin History Center, PICA 05476An early celebration of Juneteenth in 1900 at Eastwoods Park in Austin, Texas. Credit: Grace Murray Stephenson/Austin History Center, PICA 05476

In a Q&A, Radcliffe Dean and Harvard Law Professor Tomiko Brown-Nagin spoke about the history of Juneteenth and its particular relevance more than 150 years later.

"Indian Sex Life" and the Cultural Control of Women

Harvard Gazette
Thursday, June 11, 2020
Durba Mitra wrote a book on the intersection of social norms, gender expectations, and sex in Indian culture. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerDurba Mitra wrote a book on the intersection of social norms, gender expectations, and sex in Indian culture. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer

Research and personal story frame Radcliffe Professor Durba Mitra’s new book.

A "Messy Experiment"

Harvard Gazette
Monday, June 8, 2020
Mary Ingraham Bunting (standing) speaks at the Radcliffe Institute. Photo by Charles M. HagenMary Ingraham Bunting (standing) speaks at the Radcliffe Institute. Photo by Charles M. Hagen

A new book explores the early years of the Radcliffe Institute, once considered “a messy experiment” and now integral to Harvard’s intellectual life, tracing the lives of five of its first fellows.

Racial Inequalities in COVID-19—The Impact on Black Communities

Medical News Today
Friday, June 5, 2020

Medical News Today looks at the racialized impact that COVID-19 has on black communities in the United States, using expert opinions and rounding up the available evidence.

Facing the Denial of American Racism

Harvard Gazette
Friday, June 5, 2020
A roadside sign asks for justice for George Floyd, whose killing by Minneapolis police set off protests worldwide. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard staff photographerA roadside sign asks for justice for George Floyd, whose killing by Minneapolis police set off protests worldwide. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard staff photographer

The Radcliffe Institute hosted “Naming Racism,” a discussion focused on identifying the historic and ongoing social roots of racism denial, and strategies for raising awareness.

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