A Flight from Homophobia

Harvard Gazette
Monday, January 27, 2020
 "I was about to be outed in a country that hates homosexuals," said former teacher and current Radcliffe fellow Neal Hovelmeier, who hopes to one day to return to Zimbabwe. Photo by Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer "I was about to be outed in a country that hates homosexuals," said former teacher and current Radcliffe fellow Neal Hovelmeier, who hopes to one day to return to Zimbabwe. Photo by Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer

Fearing for his safety after being outed, educator and novelist Neal Hovelmeier RI '20 flees Zimbabwe to become Harvard Scholar at Risk.

Nearby Stellar Nurseries Ride a Giant Wave

Sky & Telescope
Monday, January 27, 2020
The Radcliffe Wave (red points) next to the Sun (yellow point) inside a cartoon model of our galaxy in the WorldWide Telescope software. Image courtesy of WorldWide Telescope, Alyssa Goodman et al.The Radcliffe Wave (red points) next to the Sun (yellow point) inside a cartoon model of our galaxy in the WorldWide Telescope software. Image courtesy of WorldWide Telescope, Alyssa Goodman et al.

Clouds of star-forming gas trace a long, mysterious ripple through the Milky Way, upending our picture of the Sun's neighborhood.

To Serve Better—Speak, Memory

Harvard Gazette/To Serve Better
Wednesday, January 8, 2020
Alaskan Native poet Joan Naviyuk Kane is teaching her two sons, John and George, the Qawiaraq dialect of the Inupiaq language. Photo by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerAlaskan Native poet Joan Naviyuk Kane is teaching her two sons, John and George, the Qawiaraq dialect of the Inupiaq language. Photo by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer

Poet Joan Naviyuk Kane RI '20 is fiercely dedicated to sustaining her Alaskan Inupiac language: "I think being attentive to loss doesn’t have to be devastating. It can really inform people to take action and to participate."

Behind the Radcliffe Wave, Creative Inspiration

@RadInstitute
Tuesday, January 7, 2020
Joao Alves speaking at Radcliffe about the rise of the Milky Way. Photo by Kevin Grady/Radcliffe InstituteJoao Alves speaking at Radcliffe about the rise of the Milky Way. Photo by Kevin Grady/Radcliffe Institute

Artist Anna Von Mertens’s vision guided astrophysicist João Alves and colleagues' discovery of the Radcliffe Wave.

The Giant in Our Stars

Harvard Gazette
Tuesday, January 7, 2020
In this illustration, the "Radcliffe Wave" data is overlaid on an image of the Milky Way galaxy. Image from the WorldWide Telescope, courtesy of Alyssa GoodmanIn this illustration, the "Radcliffe Wave" data is overlaid on an image of the Milky Way galaxy. Image from the WorldWide Telescope, courtesy of Alyssa Goodman

Interconnected stellar nurseries, named the Radcliffe Wave, form the largest gaseous structure ever observed in the Milky Way galaxy.

Something Appears to Have Collided with the Milky Way and Created a Huge Wave in the Galactic Plane

Newsweek
Tuesday, January 7, 2020
Visualization of the Radcliffe Wave. The wave is marked by red dots. The Sun is represented by a yellow dot to show our proximity to this huge structure. Courtesy of Alyssa Goodman/Harvard UniversityVisualization of the Radcliffe Wave. The wave is marked by red dots. The Sun is represented by a yellow dot to show our proximity to this huge structure. Courtesy of Alyssa Goodman/Harvard University

An enormous wave has been discovered in the Milky Way that may have formed as a result of a collision with a massive mystery object—potentially a clump of dark matter.

Astronomers Discover Huge Gaseous Wave Holding Milky Way's Newest Stars

The Guardian
Tuesday, January 7, 2020
A side-on visualisation shows the undulating nature of the Radcliffe Wave and the position of the sun. Photograph: Harvard UniversityA side-on visualisation shows the undulating nature of the Radcliffe Wave and the position of the sun. Photograph: Harvard University

Astronomers have discovered a gigantic, undulating wave of dust and gas where newborn stars are forged over a 50 million billion mile stretch of the Milky Way.

Astronomers Discover Giant Wave-shaped Structure in the Milky Way

CNN
Tuesday, January 7, 2020
This image shows the Radcliffe Wave, taken from the World Wide Telescope, overlaid on an artist's illustration of the Milky Way and our sun. Courtesy of Alyssa Goodman/Harvard UniversityThis image shows the Radcliffe Wave, taken from the World Wide Telescope, overlaid on an artist's illustration of the Milky Way and our sun. Courtesy of Alyssa Goodman/Harvard University

Our solar system resides in one of the Milky Way galaxy's spiral arms, and for the first time, astronomers have realized we're close to a giant wave-shaped gaseous structure that connects star nurseries.

Vast "Star Nursery" Region Found in Our Galaxy

BBC News
Tuesday, January 7, 2020
A visualisation of the Radcliffe Wave - one of the largest coherent structures in the Milky Way. Image courtesy of Alyssa Goodman/Harvard UniversityA visualisation of the Radcliffe Wave - one of the largest coherent structures in the Milky Way. Image courtesy of Alyssa Goodman/Harvard University

Astronomers have discovered a vast structure in our galaxy, made up of many interconnected "nurseries" where stars are born.

An Interstellar Ribbon of Clouds in the Sun’s Backyard

Harvard Magazine
Tuesday, January 7, 2020
The clouds that make up the Radcliffe Wave (highlighted in red) pass within just 500 light years of our sun (yellow). Wave data has been superimposed on an artist's rendering of the Milky Way galaxy as it appears in a screen shot taken from WorldWide Telescope. Image courtesy of Alyssa Goodman, Harvard UniversityThe clouds that make up the Radcliffe Wave (highlighted in red) pass within just 500 light years of our sun (yellow). Wave data has been superimposed on an artist's rendering of the Milky Way galaxy as it appears in a screen shot taken from WorldWide Telescope. Image courtesy of Alyssa Goodman, Harvard University

A 9,000-light-year-long ribbon of matter undulates through our sun’s interstellar neighborhood, made of hundreds of different clouds of dust and gas—the largest such structure of interacting nebulae yet described. Its discovery re-draws the map of our corner of the Milky Way.

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