Min Jin Lee on Her New Novel and Writing about the Korean Diaspora

Harvard Magazine
Wednesday, February 13, 2019
Photo by Ella RinaldoPhoto by Ella Rinaldo

“I worry a great deal about how Koreans are perceived,” the author says.

A Crossroads in Biomedicine?

Harvard Magazine
Thursday, February 7, 2019
Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

Nicole C. Nelson is spending her fellowship year researching the origins of the replication crisis in pre-clinical research: the experiments on animals and cell cultures that inspire the development of new pharmaceuticals. 

Twins in Space

Harvard Gazette
Wednesday, February 6, 2019
Mark (left) and Scott Kelly participated in the NASA Twins Study, which focused on the strain of spaceflight on the human body. Scott spent a year in space while Mark remained on Earth. Photo by Robert Markowoto/NASAMark (left) and Scott Kelly participated in the NASA Twins Study, which focused on the strain of spaceflight on the human body. Scott spent a year in space while Mark remained on Earth. Photo by Robert Markowoto/NASA

Brinda Rana—member of a NASA-sponsored research team examining what happens to astronauts during prolonged space flights—shared how zero gravity affects the body.

Dolores Huerta to Receive Radcliffe Medal

Harvard Gazette
Wednesday, February 6, 2019
Raising 11 children while wrestling with gender bias, union defeat and victory, Dolores Huerta was an equal partner in co-founding the first farm workers unions with Cesar Chavez. She will be honored with the Radcliffe Medal in May. Design based on Dolores movie poster, artwork courtesy PBS DistributionRaising 11 children while wrestling with gender bias, union defeat and victory, Dolores Huerta was an equal partner in co-founding the first farm workers unions with Cesar Chavez. She will be honored with the Radcliffe Medal in May. Design based on Dolores movie poster, artwork courtesy PBS Distribution

Dolores Huerta, the civil rights icon who fought to build a nationwide coalition protecting farmworkers, will receive the Radcliffe Medal on May 31.

Dolores Huerta to Receive Radcliffe Medal

Harvard Magazine
Wednesday, February 6, 2019
Dolores Huerta. Photo courtesy of the Dolores Huerta FoundationDolores Huerta. Photo courtesy of the Dolores Huerta Foundation

The labor and civil-rights activist who co-founded the National Farmworkers Association (now the United Farm Workers), will receive the Radcliffe Medal and speak to guests at Radcliffe Day on May 31, during Commencement week.

Labor Leader and Rights Advocate Dolores Huerta to Receive Radcliffe Medal

The Harvard Crimson
Wednesday, February 6, 2019
The Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study awarded this year's Radcliffe Medal to Dolores C. Huerta. Photo: Soumyaa MazumderThe Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study awarded this year's Radcliffe Medal to Dolores C. Huerta. Photo: Soumyaa Mazumder

Prominent labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores C. Huerta will receive this year’s Radcliffe Medal, the highest honor given by the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

When Science Is Unreliable

Harvard Gazette
Monday, February 4, 2019
Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

Nicole C. Nelson RI '19 delves into the scientific reproducibility crisis, a recent phenomenon in which subsequent scientific investigation has found many supposedly stable findings to be difficult to replicate.

Nonviolent Resistance Proves Potent Weapon

Harvard Gazette
Monday, February 4, 2019
The artwork, "Love and Revolution,"  revolutionary graffiti at Saleh Selim Street on the island of Zamalek, Cairo, was photographed by Hossam el-Hamalawy on Oct. 23, 2011.The artwork, "Love and Revolution," revolutionary graffiti at Saleh Selim Street on the island of Zamalek, Cairo, was photographed by Hossam el-Hamalawy on Oct. 23, 2011.

Radcliffe Professor Erica Chenoweth's research suggests that nonviolent civil resistance is far more successful in creating broad-based change than violent campaigns.

To Tackle Climate Change, Share Burden—and Benefits

Harvard Gazette
Wednesday, January 30, 2019
Daniel M. Kammen speaking at Radcliffe's Knafel Center. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerDaniel M. Kammen speaking at Radcliffe's Knafel Center. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer

Even as climate change reaches new and terrifying levels, hope remains—but the time to act is now, says Daniel M. Kammen.

As Recipe Cards Disappear, Families Scramble to Preserve Cherished Memories

The Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, January 29, 2019
Harvard's Schlesinger Library is digitizing its collection of handwritten cookbooks, including a notebook kept by famed chef Dione Lucas likely during the 1930s. Courtesy of Schlesinger LibraryHarvard's Schlesinger Library is digitizing its collection of handwritten cookbooks, including a notebook kept by famed chef Dione Lucas likely during the 1930s. Courtesy of Schlesinger Library

The internet is making paper recipes obsolete, but many modern cooks see the cards as tangible mementos of favorite foods and the beloved cooks who made them over and over again.

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