We Had Our Own Refugee Crisis. You Know it as the Civil War.

History News Network
Saturday, October 15, 2016

"Over the course of the Civil War nearly half a million men, women, and children fled from bondage to the so-called “contraband camps” that sprang up wherever the Union Army infiltrated the Confederacy. Emancipation in the US Civil War was, among other things, a refugee crisis," posits Chandra Manning, Radcliffe's Special Advisor to the Dean. 

For GOP, Days of Chaos

Harvard Gazette
Thursday, October 13, 2016
Photo by Josh Haner/The New York TimesPhoto by Josh Haner/The New York Times

A Q&A with New York Times op-ed columnist Ross Douthat '02, who moderated a panel discussion at the Radcliffe Institute, about the importance of elite academic libraries maintaining greater ideological diversity in their collections of political materials

A Welcomed Effort to Correct the Archival Record on Abortion at Harvard

National Right to Life News Today
Thursday, October 13, 2016
In 1951, Mildred Jefferson became the first black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School.In 1951, Mildred Jefferson became the first black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School.

"Far more than pro-abortion activists, pro-life activists are grassroots oriented. We keep records like nobody’s business," states the National Right to Life News Today

Girl Power

The Office for the Arts
Tuesday, October 11, 2016
Katie KohnKatie Kohn

A yearlong Schlesinger Library film series examines the power, precariousness, and politics of girlhood.

We The Petitioners: Rewriting the History of Massachusetts's Native Americans

The Harvard Crimson
Thursday, October 6, 2016
COURTESY OF HARVARD LIBRARY IMAGING SERVICESCOURTESY OF HARVARD LIBRARY IMAGING SERVICES

Dan Carpenter believes that Native Americans were the most prolific petitioners of the 19th century, “perhaps more than any other population or subpopulation in the United States at the dawn of the Republic.”

Another First for Women in Politics

The Boston Globe
Tuesday, October 4, 2016
Representative Jeannette Rankin on Feb. 27, 1917, a week before she was sworn into office. Image source: Library of CongressRepresentative Jeannette Rankin on Feb. 27, 1917, a week before she was sworn into office. Image source: Library of Congress

Remembering Jeannette Rankin, the first woman in Congress, who was elected in 1916.

What’s happening at HUBweek on Wednesday?

The Boston Globe
Wednesday, September 28, 2016

The second HUBweek, sponsored by The Boston Globe, Harvard University, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, continues Wednesday with more events to celebrate art, science, and technology, including a lecture at Radcliffe. 

Musicologist Puts Race Center-Stage

The Harvard Gazette
Tuesday, September 27, 2016
Photo by Kris SnibbePhoto by Kris Snibbe

Radcliffe fellow Carol Oja continues her work on "Black Virtuosos and Civil Rights," which chronicles the cultural history of a breakthrough generation of African American performing artists in classical music. 

Jane Jacobs's Street Smarts

The New Yorker
Monday, September 26, 2016
Jacobs, in 1969: an ordinary mom who set out to protect the neighborhood. PHOTOGRAPH BY ELLIOTT ERWITT / MAGNUM AND JOHN J. BURNS LIBRARY, BOSTON COLLEGEJacobs, in 1969: an ordinary mom who set out to protect the neighborhood. PHOTOGRAPH BY ELLIOTT ERWITT / MAGNUM AND JOHN J. BURNS LIBRARY, BOSTON COLLEGE

Radcliffe Institute Dean comments on urban planner Ed Logue and his role challenging urbanist and writer Jane Jacobs's ideas.

For Faust, New Year Brings Fresh Challenges

The Harvard Gazette
Thursday, September 15, 2016

Harvard President Drew Faust sat down with the Harvard Gazette to discuss her priorities for the months ahead. She discusses the upcoming Radcliffe Institute conference, "Universities and Slavery: Bound by History" and the book by Radcliffe Institute fellow and Pulitzer Prize winner Viet Thanh Nguyen. 

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