A New Survey Says White Support for Black Lives Matter Has Slipped. Some Historians Say They’re Not Surprised

The Boston Globe
Thursday, September 24, 2020
Tomiko Brown-Nagin. Photo by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff PhotographerTomiko Brown-Nagin. Photo by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff Photographer

Despite the backslide in white, Hispanic, and Asian support for Black Lives Matter, a majority of American adults remain in favor of the cause. “Black Lives Matter has really captured the imagination of the American public in a way that was unthinkable even five years ago.” said Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin.

Harvard Law School Honors Ginsburg

The Boston Globe
Thursday, September 24, 2020

Rurth Bader Ginsburg was, Radcliffe Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin said, a “tremendous intellect, a courageous human being, and a giant of the law.”

Statement by Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin in Remembrance of Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Saturday, September 19, 2020
Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be remembered as a champion of equality. Her legacy, however, goes far beyond what she achieved in court. Ginsburg also should be remembered for her resilience.

Pulitzer Prize-Winner Nikole Hannah-Jones Discusses 1619 Project at Radcliffe Institute Event

The Harvard Crimson
Wednesday, September 16, 2020
The journalist Nikole S. Hannah-Jones spoke at a Radcliffe Institute event Tuesday. Image by Pei Chao ZhuoThe journalist Nikole S. Hannah-Jones spoke at a Radcliffe Institute event Tuesday. Image by Pei Chao Zhuo

The Institute hosted Hannah-Jones as part of the presidential initiative on Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery.

Summer of X

Wednesday, September 9, 2020
A 19th-century engraving of Vampire Bat, Bulldog Bat, and Kalong Bat. Image from duncan1890A 19th-century engraving of Vampire Bat, Bulldog Bat, and Kalong Bat. Image from duncan1890

We asked members of the 2020–2021 fellowship class to introduce themselves by way of a recent preoccupation. Their answers suggest minds rarely at rest, even in summer.

Social Change Takes Center Stage at 2020 Summer of HOPE

Thursday, September 3, 2020
Participants in the weeklong Summer of HOPE workshop shared a "check-out" word at the end of each session.Participants in the weeklong Summer of HOPE workshop shared a "check-out" word at the end of each session.

The meaning of justice in health care, the environment, and race relations has been at the center of the national conversation the past several months. These issues informed and animated the Summer of HOPE program at the Radcliffe Institute.

Where the Wild Things Are—Now That Humans Are Locked Down

Harvard Gazette
Monday, August 31, 2020
A white stork with a solar GPS tag. Photo by Renate Herz (C)A white stork with a solar GPS tag. Photo by Renate Herz (C)

Christian Rutz RI '20 and other researchers are examining human impact on wildlife using data collected during the pandemic quarantine.

Crowd-sourcing the Story of a People

Harvard Gazette
Thursday, August 27, 2020
This fall, Professor Tiya Miles will teach "Abolitionist Women and Their World," a course in public history. Photo by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerThis fall, Professor Tiya Miles will teach "Abolitionist Women and Their World," a course in public history. Photo by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer

Radcliffe Professor Tiya Miles discusses why she believes a better understanding of the past is as likely to be found in a formal archive, a national park, or a conversation with an elderly relative as it is in the classroom.

Defining a Centennial

Harvard Gazette
Thursday, August 27, 2020
Historic figures who played prominent roles in the fight for equality: Anna Murray-Douglass (ca. 1860) (from left), Marcus Garvey with Amy Jacques Garvey (1922), and Elizabeth Freeman (1812). Source: All images Wikipedia/Public Domain; Freeman photo courtesy of Massachusetts Historical Society, BostonHistoric figures who played prominent roles in the fight for equality: Anna Murray-Douglass (ca. 1860) (from left), Marcus Garvey with Amy Jacques Garvey (1922), and Elizabeth Freeman (1812). Source: All images Wikipedia/Public Domain; Freeman photo courtesy of Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston

Panel discusses what happened in the years before Black women actually got the vote.

How Caffeine Changed the World

Harvard Gazette
Thursday, August 20, 2020
Photo by Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerPhoto by Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer

Author Michael Pollan discusses his latest work on the world’s most-used psychoactive substance.

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