The Long March for Suffrage

Harvard Gazette
Tuesday, August 18, 2020
Suffrage parade in Boston, 1914. Photo courtesy of the Women's Rights Collection, Schlesinger LibrarySuffrage parade in Boston, 1914. Photo courtesy of the Women's Rights Collection, Schlesinger Library

Radcliffe project marks 19th Amendment centennial while focusing on the women who would not be fully enfranchised for decades more.

At Summer of HOPE, Empowerment Not Punishment

Students @ Radcliffe
Thursday, August 13, 2020
Grey Johnson. Photo by Katytarika BartelGrey Johnson. Photo by Katytarika Bartel

Grey Johnson ’22 is a Harvard College student studying linguistics with a secondary in translation studies. This summer, they are serving as a co-facilitator for the Summer of HOPE program, which hosts Boston Public School students for justice-focused workshops at seven Boston-area higher education institutions, including the Radcliffe Institute. In addition to reimagining the Radcliffe week of the program for its virtual format this summer, Johnson is a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow researching Black language and creole ontologies.

Equal Justice Requires Lawmakers Reform Qualified Immunity for Police

The Boston Globe
Thursday, August 13, 2020
Tomiko Brown-Nagin. Photo by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff PhotographerTomiko Brown-Nagin. Photo by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff Photographer

The degree of clarity that courts require to permit suits for civil rights violations to proceed is excessive to the point of absurdity.

Challenge of Archiving the #MeToo Movement

Harvard Gazette
Tuesday, August 11, 2020
Protesters march against sexual assault and harassment in November 2017 in Hollywood. AP Photo/Damian DovarganesProtesters march against sexual assault and harassment in November 2017 in Hollywood. AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes

The Schlesinger Library's new online collection contains more than 32 million tweets, 1,100 webpages, and thousands of articles reflecting a range of perspectives.

Fighting COVID-19 Where it Thrives

Students @ Radcliffe
Thursday, August 6, 2020
Clockwise from top left: Oluwatobi (Tobi) I. Ariyo, Mary Galstian, and Sanjana SinghClockwise from top left: Oluwatobi (Tobi) I. Ariyo, Mary Galstian, and Sanjana Singh

This summer, Oluwatobi (Tobi) I. Ariyo ’22, Mary Galstian ’22, and Sanjana Singh ’23 worked with Lucie E. White, the Louis A. Horvitz Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, as part of a Radcliffe Research Team. The group contributed to the project “Structural Determinants of COVID ‘Hot Spots,’” which aims to map areas with higher outbreaks of COVID-19, identify vulnerabilities, and devise interventions. 

A New Voice of Leadership at Radcliffe

Students @ Radcliffe
Thursday, July 30, 2020
Courtesy of Shivani AggarwalCourtesy of Shivani Aggarwal

As a lead mentor for the Radcliffe Institute’s new Emerging Leaders Program, Shivani Aggarwal ’21 is working to create a leadership development and civic engagement curriculum that will connect local high school students to Harvard undergraduate mentors and the resources of Radcliffe and the Schlesinger Library. In addition to her role at Radcliffe, Aggarwal, whose classroom focus is integrative biology, is spending the summer conducting research on diversity and discrimination in the digital age as part of a Harvard Business School program.

Teaching Children to Be Antiracist

Harvard Gazette
Friday, July 24, 2020
Photo by Stephen VossPhoto by Stephen Voss

Scholar Ibram X. Kendi, an incoming Radcliffe Institute fellow, talks about his new picture book and how to start conversations about racism with children.

Putting Prosecutors on the Stand in Probe of Mass Incarceration

Students @ Radcliffe
Thursday, July 23, 2020
Courtesy of Chika O. OkaforCourtesy of Chika O. Okafor

Chika O. Okafor GSAS ’23 is a PhD candidate in economics at Harvard University. He earned a BA in economics (with honors) from Stanford University and a JD from Yale Law School, and he has also worked on local, national, and international policy initiatives, including with the Chicago Public Schools. With support from a Radcliffe Engaged grant, Okafor is studying the role of prosecutors in the US criminal justice system and their relationship to mass incarceration.

They're Used to Tapping. Now They're Talking.

The New York Times
Tuesday, July 21, 2020
Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

In Ayodele Casel's video series, "Diary of a Tap Dancer, v. 6: Us," performers talk about what's on their minds—and dance a little too.

Statues vs. Systemic Change: How Much of a Difference Does Tearing Down Monuments Really Make?

The Boston Globe
Saturday, July 18, 2020
Tomiko Brown-Nagin. Photo by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff PhotographerTomiko Brown-Nagin. Photo by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff Photographer

Activists, scholars, and artists at the forefront of the anti-racist movement say that symbols can be an easy out for powerful institutions still resistant to undoing systemic inequalities. But taken as a whole, the growing collection of fallen symbols is a sign of true progress.

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