Something Appears to Have Collided with the Milky Way and Created a Huge Wave in the Galactic Plane

Newsweek
Tuesday, January 7, 2020
Visualization of the Radcliffe Wave. The wave is marked by red dots. The Sun is represented by a yellow dot to show our proximity to this huge structure. Courtesy of Alyssa Goodman/Harvard UniversityVisualization of the Radcliffe Wave. The wave is marked by red dots. The Sun is represented by a yellow dot to show our proximity to this huge structure. Courtesy of Alyssa Goodman/Harvard University

An enormous wave has been discovered in the Milky Way that may have formed as a result of a collision with a massive mystery object—potentially a clump of dark matter.

Astronomers Discover Huge Gaseous Wave Holding Milky Way's Newest Stars

The Guardian
Tuesday, January 7, 2020
A side-on visualisation shows the undulating nature of the Radcliffe Wave and the position of the sun. Photograph: Harvard UniversityA side-on visualisation shows the undulating nature of the Radcliffe Wave and the position of the sun. Photograph: Harvard University

Astronomers have discovered a gigantic, undulating wave of dust and gas where newborn stars are forged over a 50 million billion mile stretch of the Milky Way.

Astronomers Discover Giant Wave-shaped Structure in the Milky Way

CNN
Tuesday, January 7, 2020
This image shows the Radcliffe Wave, taken from the World Wide Telescope, overlaid on an artist's illustration of the Milky Way and our sun. Courtesy of Alyssa Goodman/Harvard UniversityThis image shows the Radcliffe Wave, taken from the World Wide Telescope, overlaid on an artist's illustration of the Milky Way and our sun. Courtesy of Alyssa Goodman/Harvard University

Our solar system resides in one of the Milky Way galaxy's spiral arms, and for the first time, astronomers have realized we're close to a giant wave-shaped gaseous structure that connects star nurseries.

Vast "Star Nursery" Region Found in Our Galaxy

BBC News
Tuesday, January 7, 2020
A visualisation of the Radcliffe Wave - one of the largest coherent structures in the Milky Way. Image courtesy of Alyssa Goodman/Harvard UniversityA visualisation of the Radcliffe Wave - one of the largest coherent structures in the Milky Way. Image courtesy of Alyssa Goodman/Harvard University

Astronomers have discovered a vast structure in our galaxy, made up of many interconnected "nurseries" where stars are born.

An Interstellar Ribbon of Clouds in the Sun’s Backyard

Harvard Magazine
Tuesday, January 7, 2020
The clouds that make up the Radcliffe Wave (highlighted in red) pass within just 500 light years of our sun (yellow). Wave data has been superimposed on an artist's rendering of the Milky Way galaxy as it appears in a screen shot taken from WorldWide Telescope. Image courtesy of Alyssa Goodman, Harvard UniversityThe clouds that make up the Radcliffe Wave (highlighted in red) pass within just 500 light years of our sun (yellow). Wave data has been superimposed on an artist's rendering of the Milky Way galaxy as it appears in a screen shot taken from WorldWide Telescope. Image courtesy of Alyssa Goodman, Harvard University

A 9,000-light-year-long ribbon of matter undulates through our sun’s interstellar neighborhood, made of hundreds of different clouds of dust and gas—the largest such structure of interacting nebulae yet described. Its discovery re-draws the map of our corner of the Milky Way.

Harvard Scientists Find Wave of Stellar Nurseries in Milky Way

The Harvard Crimson
Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Astronomers at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study have discovered a massive wave of stellar nurseries located near the sun, one of the largest coherent gaseous structures ever observed in the Milky Way.

Shawon Kinew

Harvard Magazine
Wednesday, January 1, 2020
Photo by Stu RosnerPhoto by Stu Rosner

Radcliffe Professor Shawon Kinew is interested in how early modern sculptors pushed the boundaries of what sculpture should be able to do.

Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Dr. Angela Davis: Freed by the People

Huck
Wednesday, December 18, 2019
Detail from angela Davis's FBI Wanted Flyer #457, 1970. Courtesy of Schlesinger LibraryDetail from angela Davis's FBI Wanted Flyer #457, 1970. Courtesy of Schlesinger Library

A new exhibition uncovers the political activist’s photographs, speeches, and letters, tracking the experiences that helped make her the woman she is today.

Bringing the Human Heart to Life

Experience Magazine
Tuesday, December 17, 2019
Detail of Unknown and Solitary Seas. Photo courtesy of Inman Gallery, HoustonDetail of Unknown and Solitary Seas. Photo courtesy of Inman Gallery, Houston

Artist Dario Robleto and cardiovascular scientist Doris Taylor are each experts on the human heart. They learned even more about it from one another.

The Hunt for a Lost Book of Moses

Harvard Gazette
Friday, December 13, 2019
Chanan Tigay during his talk at Radcliffe. Photo by Kevin Grady/Radcliffe InstituteChanan Tigay during his talk at Radcliffe. Photo by Kevin Grady/Radcliffe Institute

Radcliffe scholar Chanan Tigay tried to track down what could be a forgery, or the oldest Bible in the world.

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