Activists Promote Education in Prisons at Harvard Radcliffe Institute

Friday, October 30, 2020
Image source: Marjorie Kamys Cotera/Bob Daemmrich PhotographyImage source: Marjorie Kamys Cotera/Bob Daemmrich Photography

Prison reform activists argued in favor of high-quality education in prisons at a webinar hosted by Radcliffe.

A Special Issue of Radcliffe Magazine

Thursday, October 29, 2020
Illustration by Calvin LaituriIllustration by Calvin Laituri

Lizabeth Cohen, Junot Díaz, Linda Greenhouse, Lauren Groff, Evie Shockley, and other members of the Radcliffe community respond to the chaos, sorrow, and conflict of 2020 in essays that reflect national and emotional unrest.

Civil Rights Author Discusses His Past and the Future of Racial Justice Activism

The Harvard Crimson
Thursday, October 29, 2020
Michael K. Honey. Photo courtesy of University of Washington TacomaMichael K. Honey. Photo courtesy of University of Washington Tacoma

Michael K. Honey RI '21 spoke on the intersection of civil rights and labor and recounted his participation in social justice activism.

Radcliffe Panelists Link Systemic Racism, Obesity, COVID-19

The Harvard Crimson
Wednesday, October 28, 2020
Image source: REUTERS/Alamy Stock PhotoImage source: REUTERS/Alamy Stock Photo

Sara Bleich and Sabrina Strings discussed how slavery-era inequities are linked to modern health disparities, higher obesity, and disproportionately high COVID-19 mortality rates among Black Americans.

Scientists Speak on Water's Role in Climate Change, Public Health and Planetary Science at Radcliffe Institute Event

The Harvard Crimson
Monday, October 26, 2020
Four early-career scientists presented their research findings on water's role in climate change, earth science, public health, and planet habitability at a Radcliffe Institute event.Four early-career scientists presented their research findings on water's role in climate change, earth science, public health, and planet habitability at a Radcliffe Institute event.

The event was part of the Radcliffe Insitute's “Next in Science” series spotlighting the work of up-and-coming researchers.

Radcliffe Fellow Reid-Pharr Discusses Forthcoming Book on James Baldwin in Online Event Series

The Harvard Crimson
Thursday, October 22, 2020
Radcliffe Fellow Robert F. Reid-Pharr showcased his work on the legendary novelist, poet, and activist James Baldwin as part of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study Fellows' Presentation Series on Wednesday afternoon. Photo by Kathryn S. KuharRadcliffe Fellow Robert F. Reid-Pharr showcased his work on the legendary novelist, poet, and activist James Baldwin as part of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study Fellows' Presentation Series on Wednesday afternoon. Photo by Kathryn S. Kuhar

Robert F. Reid-Pharr showcased his work on the legendary novelist, poet, and activist James Baldwin.

Black Lives Matter Protesters Were Overwhelmingly Peaceful, Our Research Finds

The Spokesman-Review
Tuesday, October 20, 2020
Photo courtesy of Erica ChenowethPhoto courtesy of Erica Chenoweth

The Black Lives Matter uprisings were remarkably nonviolent. When there was violence, very often police or counterprotesters were reportedly directing it at the protesters.

Face to Face with America’s Original Sin

Harvard Gazette
Tuesday, October 20, 2020
To Make Their Own Way in the World: The Enduring Legacy of the Zealy Daguerreotypes book cover

In 1850 Harvard professor and biologist Louis Agassiz commissioned a study in scientific racism. The resulting images of a group of people of African descent are now known as the Zealy daguerreotypes and have become critical artifacts in the study of enslavement and racism in American history.

Initiative on Legacy of Slavery at Harvard Picks Up Steam

Harvard Gazette
Thursday, October 15, 2020
In the 18th century, the Royall House was home to the largest slaveholding family in Massachusetts. It was a bequest from Isaac Royall Jr. that funded the establishment of Harvard Law School in 1817. In 2016, the Harvard Corporation approved the removal of the Law School's shield, which was derived directly from the Royall coat of arms. Courtesy of Special Collections, Fine Arts Library, Harvard UniversityIn the 18th century, the Royall House was home to the largest slaveholding family in Massachusetts. It was a bequest from Isaac Royall Jr. that funded the establishment of Harvard Law School in 1817. In 2016, the Harvard Corporation approved the removal of the Law School's shield, which was derived directly from the Royall coat of arms. Courtesy of Special Collections, Fine Arts Library, Harvard University

Amid a national reckoning on race, Harvard's Radcliffe-based program is pressing forward with efforts to examine its historic ties to slavery and their lasting effects.

Scholars Discuss Scientific Racism, Abolition in Radcliffe Panel on Zealy Daguerreotype Book

The Harvard Crimson
Friday, October 9, 2020
The Radcliffe Institute hosted a virtual panel on scientific racism Thursday. By Soumyaa MazumderThe Radcliffe Institute hosted a virtual panel on scientific racism Thursday. By Soumyaa Mazumder

Discussion in “The Enduring Legacy of Slavery and Racism in the North” included current scholarship focused on centering Black stories in American history.

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