Exploring the North’s Long History of Slavery, Scientific Racism

Harvard Gazette
Friday, October 9, 2020
University of Connecticut Professor Manisha Sinha spoke about African American intellectuals James W.C. Pennington, Frederick Douglass, and William Wells Brown who, she says, often offered ethical and moral arguments against scientific racism. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerUniversity of Connecticut Professor Manisha Sinha spoke about African American intellectuals James W.C. Pennington, Frederick Douglass, and William Wells Brown who, she says, often offered ethical and moral arguments against scientific racism. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer

Radcliffe webinar exploring the legacy of slavery upends myths of Northern blamelessness.

Scholars Discuss 19th Amendment’s Achievements and Shortcomings in Radcliffe Panel

The Harvard Crimson
Sunday, October 4, 2020
Photo by Kathryn S. KuharPhoto by Kathryn S. Kuhar

In the third session of “Voting Matters: Gender, Citizenship, and the Long 19th Amendment," speakers discussed topics ranging from voting rights to the lack of representation for women in government and politics.

How to Be an Antiracist Nonprofit or Company

Harvard Gazette
Thursday, October 1, 2020
 Khalil Gibran Muhammad is faculty director of the Institutional Antiracism and Accountability Project. Photo by Martha Stewart Khalil Gibran Muhammad is faculty director of the Institutional Antiracism and Accountability Project. Photo by Martha Stewart

Radcliffe Professor Khalil Gibran Muhammad leads Harvard Kennedy School research initiative to look at why diversity and inclusion efforts succeed or fail.

Being with the Other

Harvard Magazine
Wednesday, September 30, 2020
Marilyn Pappas and Jill Slosburg-Ackerman, Accompanied: Two Views of the Sea, 2017-2020. Cotton thread, colored pencil on paper, pine, gouache, 11.5 x 9.5 x 1.5 inches. Courtesy of the artists.Marilyn Pappas and Jill Slosburg-Ackerman, Accompanied: Two Views of the Sea, 2017-2020. Cotton thread, colored pencil on paper, pine, gouache, 11.5 x 9.5 x 1.5 inches. Courtesy of the artists.

A Radcliffe exhibition explores a lifetime of artwork and female friendship.

How Amy Coney Barrett Would Reshape the Court—And the Country

POLITICO
Saturday, September 26, 2020

Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin and other legal thinkers game out what President Trump’s new Supreme Court pick means for America’s biggest legal fights.

A New Survey Says White Support for Black Lives Matter Has Slipped. Some Historians Say They’re Not Surprised

The Boston Globe
Thursday, September 24, 2020
Tomiko Brown-Nagin. Photo by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff PhotographerTomiko Brown-Nagin. Photo by Rose Lincoln, Harvard Staff Photographer

Nevertheless, “Black Lives Matter has really captured the imagination of the American public in a way that was unthinkable even five years ago.” said Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin.

Harvard Law School Honors Ginsburg

The Boston Globe
Thursday, September 24, 2020

Ruth Bader Ginsburg was, Radcliffe Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin said, a “tremendous intellect, a courageous human being, and a giant of the law.”

How Should the US Presidential Candidates Think about Criminal Justice Reform?

Harvard Kennedy School
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Police officer wearing protective mask stands in front of a criminal justice reform sign in Washington, DC. Photo by Stephani Reynolds/BloombergPolice officer wearing protective mask stands in front of a criminal justice reform sign in Washington, DC. Photo by Stephani Reynolds/Bloomberg

Harvard experts—including Radcliffe's Sandra Susan Smith and Kaia Stern—weigh in on police reform, decarceration, juvenile justice, and changing our policies toward immigrants.

Statement by Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin in Remembrance of Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Saturday, September 19, 2020
Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be remembered as a champion of equality. Her legacy, however, goes far beyond what she achieved in court. Ginsburg also should be remembered for her resilience.

Pulitzer Prize-Winner Nikole Hannah-Jones Discusses 1619 Project at Radcliffe Institute Event

The Harvard Crimson
Wednesday, September 16, 2020
The journalist Nikole S. Hannah-Jones spoke at a Radcliffe Institute event Tuesday. Image by Pei Chao ZhuoThe journalist Nikole S. Hannah-Jones spoke at a Radcliffe Institute event Tuesday. Image by Pei Chao Zhuo

The Institute hosted Hannah-Jones as part of the presidential initiative on Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery.

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