Karin B. Michels. Photo by Tim LlewellynKarin B. Michels. Photo by Tim Llewellyn

Radcliffe’s Epi-Epi Episode

An Exploratory Seminar attempted to understand the epigenome, “a complex switching mechanism” that tells each cell what its function is.

The Civil War was a literate war, Faust said, and people were moved to record their thoughts. They knew they were living in momentous times. Photo by Tony RinaldoThe Civil War was a literate war, Faust said, and people were moved to record their thoughts. They knew they were living in momentous times. Photo by Tony Rinaldo

What They Wrote, What They Saved

The Schlesinger Library marks the 150th anniversary of the Civil War with an exhibition of diaries, letters, photographs, prints, and more.

Ned Blackhawk. Photo by Kevin Grady, Radcliffe Staff PhotographerNed Blackhawk. Photo by Kevin Grady, Radcliffe Staff Photographer

Remembering the Sand Creek Massacre

November 29, 2014, marked the 150th anniversary of the Sand Creek Massacre—a massacre of Native Americans so horrific that it prompted two Congressional investigations, forced the resignation of two leaders, and launched years of battle with the Plains Indians following the Civil War.

Photo by Jason WychePhoto by Jason Wyche

Artist Kara Walker: Reluctant Activist

Kara Walker spoke at Radcliffe about her most recent creation—a massive sculptural synthesis of a sphinx and a “mammy” crafted from Styrofoam and sugar—which garnered rave reviews and challenged more than 130,000 visitors with complex themes of race, gender, power, sex, desire, and slavery.

Hiawatha BrayHiawatha Bray

Finding Our Way in the World

What do sea turtles, pulsars, shantytowns, and a seahorse-shaped section of the brain have in common? As came to light during a fall 2014 Radcliffe science symposium, multidisciplinary research on these and other topics is beginning to spark insights into how humans and other creatures find their way in the world.

Photo by Jon Chase, Harvard Staff PhotographerPhoto by Jon Chase, Harvard Staff Photographer

Melissa Harris-Perry: A Public Intellectual with Global Impact

Melissa Harris-Perry, the social scientist and MSNBC host, shared insights from her scholarly research—delivered with the “touch of speechifying” for which she’s known.

Dean Lizabeth Cohen with Maryellie Kulukundis Johnson '57 and her husband, Rupert H. Johnson Jr., donors to the arts at Harvard University.Dean Lizabeth Cohen with Maryellie Kulukundis Johnson '57 and her husband, Rupert H. Johnson Jr., donors to the arts at Harvard University.

Funding the Arts at Harvard University

Arts leaders across Harvard joined members of the Radcliffe community to toast Maryellie Kulukundis Johnson and her husband, Rupert H. Johnson Jr., for their generosity. Their gift will establish the Johnson-Kulukundis Family Gallery in Byerly Hall.

Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo

Quick Study: Francesca Rossi

A professor of computer science at the University of Padova, in Italy, Francesca Rossi RI ’15 specializes in artificial intelligence and multiagent systems.

Photo by Bob O'ConnorPhoto by Bob O'Connor

Robert N. Shapiro: An Advocate of One Harvard

“Radcliffe is a microcosm of the University at its best,” Robert N. Shapiro ’72, JD ’78 says. “It’s an example of how Harvard can be more unified. Radcliffe catalyzes ideas, and that is the stuff of a great research university.”