An Exhibition Lives Online

In 1932, Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935), one of the intellectual leaders of the women's movement from the 1890s through the 1920s and an author, was diagnosed with incurable breast cancer. Long an advocate of euthanasia, Gilman committed suicide on August 17, 1935, choosing, she wrote, "chloroform over cancer." Before her body was cremated, this plaster death mask was made. Charlotte Perkins Gilman Papers, Schlesinger LibraryIn 1932, Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935), one of the intellectual leaders of the women's movement from the 1890s through the 1920s and an author, was diagnosed with incurable breast cancer. Long an advocate of euthanasia, Gilman committed suicide on August 17, 1935, choosing, she wrote, "chloroform over cancer." Before her body was cremated, this plaster death mask was made. Charlotte Perkins Gilman Papers, Schlesinger Library

Although the physical manifestation of 75 Stories, 75 Years: Documenting the Lives of American Women at the Schlesinger Library—which ran from February 5 through November 1, 2018—was dismantled and packed up along with the rest of the Library’s contents, it remains on view online. 

The documents and objects in this exhibition, which marked our 75th anniversary, evoke the depth and breadth of the Schlesinger’s holdings. They tell 75 stories—harrowing, heartbreaking, pathbreaking, brave—about American women’s lives and about the history of the Library itself.

Visit today and marvel at the history of the United States through the remarkable, curious, and sometimes provocative items housed at the Library.  

schlesinger75radcliffe.org

In 1932, Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935), one of the intellectual leaders of the women's movement from the 1890s through the 1920s and an author, was diagnosed with incurable breast cancer. Long an advocate of euthanasia, Gilman committed suicide on August 17, 1935, choosing, she wrote, "chloroform over cancer." Before her body was cremated, this plaster death mask was made. Charlotte Perkins Gilman Papers, Schlesinger LibraryIn 1932, Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935), one of the intellectual leaders of the women's movement from the 1890s through the 1920s and an author, was diagnosed with incurable breast cancer. Long an advocate of euthanasia, Gilman committed suicide on August 17, 1935, choosing, she wrote, "chloroform over cancer." Before her body was cremated, this plaster death mask was made. Charlotte Perkins Gilman Papers, Schlesinger Library

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2018