Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo
BevilConway
2010–2011
The Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Foundation Fellow
Wellesley College
Biology
Color: Neural Mechanisms and Art Practice

Bevil Conway is an assistant professor of neuroscience and the Knafel Assistant Professor of Natural Science at Wellesley College. He is also an artist. His work examines the mechanisms that the brain uses to transform sensory information into behavior, with a particular focus on color. He is also interested in the relationship between neural processing and art and dance.

At Radcliffe, Conway will use brain imaging and neural recording to uncover neural mechanisms that underlie color perception. His goal is to relate these mechanisms to strategies employed by artists in painting color, specifically with regard to color constancy, color categories, color saturation, and color memory.

Conway has a PhD from Harvard University and did postdoctoral work with David Hubel. He has written more than two dozen articles and one book, Neural Mechanisms of Color Vision: Double-Opponent Cells in the Visual Cortex (Kluwer Academic, 2002). He was elected a junior fellow in the Harvard Society of Fellows and subsequently received a Humboldt Research Fellowship. His research has been supported by grants from the National Science Foundation and the Whitehall Foundation. His artwork has been included in numerous solo and group exhibitions, is reproduced in a number of books, and is held in private and public collections. Conway’s work has been reviewed in the scientific and popular press, including the New York Times, Science, and Scientific American, and in 2008, he was profiled in the Meeting the Minds series in the Boston Globe.

This information is accurate as of the fellowship year indicated for each fellow.
Photo by Tony Rinaldo