Photo by Kevin Grady/Radcliffe InstitutePhoto by Kevin Grady/Radcliffe Institute
John KuumuoriGanle
2018–2019
Radcliffe-Stellenbosch Fellow/Hrdy Fellow
University of Ghana (Ghana)
Biology and Medical Sciences
Disability and Reproduction in Africa

John Kuumuori Ganle is a lecturer in the Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health, School of Public Health at the University of Ghana. Ganle teaches courses in sexual, reproductive, and maternal health to undergraduate and graduate students. He has also successfully supervised 10 master’s in public health students on various research topics.

Ganle is committed to developing and supporting the use of qualitative research methodologies to understanding dynamics of health-care utilization in differing contexts. He is committed to developing a medium-to-long-term career in healthcare for hard-to-reach groups, including persons with disabilities and other underserved groups. Specifically, Ganle aims to lead a team of researchers in an African setting working on sexual, reproductive, and maternal health care for these populations.

Ganle holds a DPhil in public health from the University of Oxford. He also holds an MPhil from Oxford, an MSc from the University of Bristol, and a BA from Kwame Nkrumah University of Science & Technology. His publications have appeared in such internationally reputed journals as BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, Oxford Development Studies, PLOS One, Social Science & Medicine, Reproductive Health, and World Development. Ganle has conducted collaborative research with researchers from Australia, Germany, Ghana, Kenya, Sierra Leone, Sweden, Uganda, and the United Kingdom. Aside from his Radcliffe fellowship, his recent awards include a three-year Iso Lomso Fellowship for Early Career African Researchers from the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study, in South Africa. Ganle was also selected to be a member of the Global Young Academy, based in Germany.

2018–2019 Radcliffe Institute Fellows

This information is accurate as of the fellowship year indicated for each fellow.
Photo by Kevin Grady/Radcliffe Institute