Photo by Kathleen DooherPhoto by Kathleen Dooher
TamarHerzog
2015–2016
Radcliffe Alumnae Professor
Harvard University
History
Normativity and Its Discontents: The Shaping and Reshaping of Law in Europe from Classical to Modern Times

Tamar Herzog’s work centers on the relationship between Spain, Portugal, and Portuguese and Spanish America and the ways by which Iberian societies changed as a result of their involvement in a colonial project. She is a legal scholar and historian by training, and her work engages with early modern European history, colonial Latin American history, imperial history, Atlantic history, and legal history. Herzog is the Radcliffe Alumnae Professor at the Institute and the Monroe Gutman Professor of Latin American Affairs at Harvard University.

During her tenure at the Radcliffe Institute, Herzog is writing a monograph on the history of European law—which would include consideration of both Continental and English law as well as colonial law—with the aim of demonstrating how law evolved over time.

Herzog was a 2012 Guggenheim Fellow, a 2000–2001 Jean Monnet Postdoctoral Fellow at the European University Institute, and a 1996–1997 member at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. She has been a visiting scholar at École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS, School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences), Fondation Maison des sciences de l’homme, and Wolfson College Cambridge. She earned her PhD from EHESS and, since then, has conducted research in France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Latin America, Portugal, Spain, and the United Kingdom. 

2015–2016 Radcliffe Institute Fellows

This information is accurate as of the fellowship year indicated for each fellow.
Photo by Kathleen Dooher