Where We Stand in Earthquake Prediction | Marine A. Denolle

December 13, 2018
Where We Stand in Earthquake Prediction by Marine A. Denolle

As part of the 2018–2019 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Marine A. Denolle RI '19 expresses her hope that—with new methods, through harnessing the data, and by expanding on short-term term forecasting—one day we may potentially be able to predict an earthquake.

Denolle is a seismologist focused on understanding large earthquakes and their resulting ground motion. Her research has mostly investigated the seismic radiation from large plate-boundary earthquakes and the amplification of their ground motion in the urban sedimentary basin. She is an assistant professor of earth and planetary sciences in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences and a 2018–2019 Radcliffe Alumnae Fellow.

Next in Evolution | Sriram Sankararaman

December 4, 2018
Next in Evolution, Sriram Sankararaman

ARCHAIC ADMIXTURE IN HUMAN HISTORY (4:54)
Sriram Sankararaman, assistant professor, Department of Computer Science and Department of Human Genetics, UCLA

Welcome and introduction by Immaculata De Vivo, interim faculty codirector of science, Radcliffe Institute; professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School; professor of epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

In 2018–2019, the Next in Science series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study focused on innovative research in the study of evolution. The analysis of genetic change examines both historic and current adaptations: how past species evolved over long periods of time and how modern species continue to adjust to present-day conditions.

The Next in Science series provides an opportunity for early-career scientists whose innovative, cross-disciplinary research is thematically linked to introduce their work to one another, to fellow scientists, and to nonspecialists from Harvard and the greater Boston area.

Next in Evolution | Discussion and Audience Q&A

December 4, 2018
Next in Evolution, Discussion and Audience Q&A

DISCUSSION AND AUDIENCE Q&A

Featuring
Sriram Sankararaman, assistant professor, Department of Computer Science and Department of Human Genetics, UCLA

Alicia R. Martin, research fellow, Massachusetts General Hospital and Broad Institute

Catherine E. Wagner, assistant professor, Department of Botany and Biodiversity Institute, University of Wyoming

James S. Santangelo, graduate student in evolutionary ecology, University of Toronto Mississauga

Moderated by Immaculata De Vivo, interim faculty codirector of science, Radcliffe Institute; professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School; professor of epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

In 2018–2019, the Next in Science series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study focused on innovative research in the study of evolution. The analysis of genetic change examines both historic and current adaptations: how past species evolved over long periods of time and how modern species continue to adjust to present-day conditions.

The Next in Science series provides an opportunity for early-career scientists whose innovative, cross-disciplinary research is thematically linked to introduce their work to one another, to fellow scientists, and to nonspecialists from Harvard and the greater Boston area.

Next in Evolution | Alicia R. Martin

December 4, 2018
Next in Evolution, Alicia R. Martin

GENETIC PREDICTION OF TRAITS AND DISEASES ACROSS DIVERSE POPULATIONS
Alicia R. Martin, research fellow, Massachusetts General Hospital and Broad Institute

In 2018–2019, the Next in Science series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study focused on innovative research in the study of evolution. The analysis of genetic change examines both historic and current adaptations: how past species evolved over long periods of time and how modern species continue to adjust to present-day conditions.

The Next in Science series provides an opportunity for early-career scientists whose innovative, cross-disciplinary research is thematically linked to introduce their work to one another, to fellow scientists, and to nonspecialists from Harvard and the greater Boston area.

Next in Evolution | Catherine E. Wagner

December 4, 2018
Next in Evolution, Catherine E. Wagner

THE EVOLUTION OF DIVERSITY IN EAST AFRICAN CICHLID FISHES
Catherine E. Wagner, assistant professor, Department of Botany and Biodiversity Institute, University of Wyoming

In 2018–2019, the Next in Science series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study focused on innovative research in the study of evolution. The analysis of genetic change examines both historic and current adaptations: how past species evolved over long periods of time and how modern species continue to adjust to present-day conditions.

The Next in Science series provides an opportunity for early-career scientists whose innovative, cross-disciplinary research is thematically linked to introduce their work to one another, to fellow scientists, and to nonspecialists from Harvard and the greater Boston area.

Next in Evolution | James S. Santangelo

December 4, 2018
Next in Evolution, James S. Santangelo

EVOLUTION OF LIFE IN THE CITY
James S. Santangelo, graduate student in evolutionary ecology, University of Toronto Mississauga

In 2018–2019, the Next in Science series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study focused on innovative research in the study of evolution. The analysis of genetic change examines both historic and current adaptations: how past species evolved over long periods of time and how modern species continue to adjust to present-day conditions.

The Next in Science series provides an opportunity for early-career scientists whose innovative, cross-disciplinary research is thematically linked to introduce their work to one another, to fellow scientists, and to nonspecialists from Harvard and the greater Boston area.

Opening Discussion for Measure | Anna Von Mertens

November 26, 2018
Opening Discussion for Measure by Anna Von Mertens

The artist Anna Von Mertens presents an opening discussion on Measure, a commissioned exhibition for the Radcliffe Institute that explores the life and work of Henrietta Swan Leavitt, one of the women "computers" hired to study glass-plate astronomical photographs at the Harvard College Observatory a century ago. Our current understanding of the size and shape of the cosmos is due in no small part to Leavitt's patient search for patterns, reimagined in Von Mertens's meticulous stitches and intricate graphite marks.

Joining her in conversation is Jennifer L. Roberts, Johnson-Kulukundis Family Faculty Director of the Arts, Radcliffe Institute, and Elizabeth Cary Agassiz Professor of the Humanities, Department of History of Art and Architecture, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

Disability and Citizenship | Higher Education and Closing Remarks

November 21, 2018
Disability and Citizenship, Higher Education and Closing Remarks

The Radcliffe Institute is in the second year of a two-year exploration of the broad theme of local, national, and international citizenship through a series of public and private programs, fellowships, special collections, and exhibitions.

As part of that exploration, this conference, "Disability and Citizenship: Global and Local Perspectives," explores the ways in which contemporary notions of disability are linked to concepts of citizenship and belonging. Leaders in advocacy, education, medicine, and politics consider how ideas of community at the local, national, and international levels affect the understanding of and policies related to disability—and how this has manifested itself, in particular, in higher education.

HIGHER EDUCATION
(9:13) Gopal Mitra, program specialist on children with disabilities, Disability Section, UNICEF

(25:26) Andrew J. Imparato, executive director, Association of University Centers on Disabilities

(42:13) Lisa I. Iezzoni, professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School; director, Mongan Institute Health Policy Center, Massachusetts General Hospital

Moderator: Michael Ashley Stein, executive director, Harvard Law School Project on Disability, and visiting professor of law, Harvard Law School

AUDIENCE Q&A (58:00)

CLOSING REMARKS
(1:13:07) Judith E. Heumann, senior fellow, Ford Foundation

Structure in Motion | Ciprian S. Borcea and Ileana Streinu

November 20, 2018
Structure in Motion by Ciprian S. Borcea and Ileana Streinu

As part of the 2018–2019 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Ciprian S. Borcea RI '19 and Ileana Streinu RI '19 share new geometrical results, techniques, and insights related to protein folding, robot kinematics, and auxetic behavior in crystalline or cellular materials, disclosing various analogies and structural characteristics.

Ciprian S. Borcea is a professor of mathematics at Rider University, in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. He is the 2018–2019 Elizabeth S. and Richard M. Cashin Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute. 

Ileana Streinu is the Charles N. Clark Professor of Computer Science and Mathematics at Smith College, in Northampton, Massachusetts. She is the 2018–2019 Frances B. Cashin Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute.

Disability and Citizenship | Introductory Remarks and Keynote Conversation

November 20, 2018
Disability and Citizenship, Introductory Remarks and Keynote Conversation

The Radcliffe Institute is in the second year of a two-year exploration of the broad theme of local, national, and international citizenship through a series of public and private programs, fellowships, special collections, and exhibitions.

As part of that exploration, this conference, "Disability and Citizenship: Global and Local Perspectives," explores the ways in which contemporary notions of disability are linked to concepts of citizenship and belonging. Leaders in advocacy, education, medicine, and politics consider how ideas of community at the local, national, and international levels affect the understanding of and policies related to disability—and how this has manifested itself, in particular, in higher education.

WELCOME
Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean, Radcliffe Institute; Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law, Harvard Law School; professor of history, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

INTRODUCTORY REMARKS
(5:28) Cheri A. Blauwet, assistant professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital/Brigham and Women's Hospital

(10:25) Michael Ashley Stein, executive director, Harvard Law School Project on Disability, and visiting professor of law, Harvard Law School

KEYNOTE CONVERSATION (16:11)
Judith E. Heumann, senior fellow, Ford Foundation

Thomas Hehir, Silvana and Christopher Pascucci Professor of Practice in Learning Differences, Harvard Graduate School of Education

AUDIENCE Q&A (44:40)

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