Hillary Rodham Clinton | Radcliffe Day 2018

May 31, 2018
Hillary Rodham Clinton | Radcliffe Day 2018

On Radcliffe Day 2018, Friday, May 25, we awarded the Radcliffe Medal to Hillary Rodham Clinton (1:32:14).

As an attorney, a first lady, a senator, a secretary of state, and the first woman nominated by a major party for the US presidency, Secretary Clinton has worked tirelessly over the course of decades in the public eye, often under unprecedented scrutiny, to make meaningful change.

Radcliffe Day features a personal tribute to Secretary Clinton delivered by the global affairs trailblazer, former secretary of state, and 2001 Radcliffe Medalist Madeleine Albright (35:09) and a wide-ranging keynote conversation between Secretary Clinton and Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey '92 (46:45).

Introduction by Lizabeth Cohen, dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and the Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies at Harvard University

Toward a New Global Architecture? America’s Role in a Changing World | Radcliffe Day 2018

May 31, 2018
Toward a New Global Architecture? America’s Role in a Changing World | Radcliffe Day 2018

Radcliffe Day 2018 opens with a panel titled "Toward a New Global Architecture? America's Role in a Changing World." In 2009, then–Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton outlined a vision for a global architecture "in which states have clear incentives to cooperate and live up to their responsibilities, as well as strong disincentives to sit on the sidelines or sow discord and division." Nearly a decade later, the United States is still grappling with complex questions about its role in global affairs.

Nicholas Burns (10:29), the Roy and Barbara Goodman Family Professor of the Practice of Diplomacy and International Relations at Harvard Kennedy School and a career diplomat who served as US ambassador to NATO and undersecretary of state for political affairs, moderates a discussion exploring these issues. The panel features the foreign policy experts Michèle Flournoy '83, David Ignatius '72, Meghan O'Sullivan, and Anne-Marie Slaughter JD '85.

Introduction by Lizabeth Cohen, dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and the Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies at Harvard University

Algorithmic Accountability: Designing for Safety | Ben Shneiderman

May 22, 2018
Algorithmic Accountability: Designing for Safety by Ben Shneiderman

Vital services such as communications, financial trading, health care, and transportation depend on sophisticated algorithms. Some rely on unpredictable artificial intelligence techniques, such as deep learning, that are increasingly embedded in complex software systems. As high-speed trading, medical devices, and autonomous aircraft become more widely used, stronger checks are necessary to prevent failures. Design strategies that promote comprehensible, predictable, and controllable human-centered systems can increase safety and make failure investigations more effective. Social strategies that support human-centered independent oversight during planning, continuous monitoring during operation, and retrospective analyses following failures can play a powerful role in making more reliable and trustworthy systems. Clarifying responsibility for failures stimulates improved design thinking.

Ben Shneiderman is a Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Computer Science and the founding director (1983–2000) of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory at the University of Maryland, where he is also a member of the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies.

This event is cosponsored by the Harvard Data Science Initiative.

Biological Motion | Janina Wellmann

May 22, 2018
Biological Motion by Janina Wellmann

As part of the 2017–2018 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Janina Wellmann '18 presents a comprehensive history of concepts, images, and ways of moving in biology from the 18th century to today.

Wellmann is a historian at Leuphana University of Lüneburg, in Germany. She studies the history of the life sciences from the early modern period to today in a broad interdisciplinary perspective with a particular focus on ways, practices, and media of visualizing the living world. She is the 2017–2018 Maury Green Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

Next in (Data) Science | Part 1

May 17, 2018

The Next in Science Series provides an opportunity for early-career scientists whose innovative, cross-disciplinary research is thematically linked to introduce their work to one another, to fellow scientists, and to nonspecialists from Harvard and the greater Boston area.

This year's program focuses on innovative applications of data science to a wide range of disciplines. The speakers' talks demonstrate how data science approaches have become critical to a variety of fields, including social media, the movie industry, public health, and the study of the origins of our universe.

Welcome and Introduction
Alyssa A. Goodman, faculty codirector of the science program, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and Robert Wheeler Willson Professor of Applied Astronomy, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

(5:55) "Uncovering Online Censorship and Propaganda in China"
Jennifer Pan, assistant professor of communication and, by courtesy, of political science and sociology, Stanford University

(31:16) "Hollywood Data Science: The Role of Inference and Prediction"
Nathan Sanders, vice president of quantitative analytics, Legendary Entertainment

Next in (Data) Science | Part 2

May 17, 2018
Next in (Data) Science | Part 2

The Next in Science Series provides an opportunity for early-career scientists whose innovative, cross-disciplinary research is thematically linked to introduce their work to one another, to fellow scientists, and to nonspecialists from Harvard and the greater Boston area.

This year's program focuses on innovative applications of data science to a wide range of disciplines. The speakers' talks demonstrate how data science approaches have become critical to a variety of fields, including social media, the movie industry, public health, and the study of the origins of our universe.

Introduction
Alyssa A. Goodman, faculty codirector of the science program, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and Robert Wheeler Willson Professor of Applied Astronomy, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

(3:29) "From Data to Decisions: An Epidemiological Atlas to Prevent Childhood Infections"
Saki Takahashi, graduate fellow, Metcalf Lab, Princeton University

(31:48) "Seeing the Light for the Stars: Using Machine Learning to Discover New Astronomical Events"
Renée Hložek, professor of astrophysics, Dunlap Institute, University of Toronto

(52:25) Discussion and Audience Q&A

The Other Side of Terror | Erica R. Edwards

May 17, 2018
The Other Side of Terror by Erica R. Edwards

As part of the 2017–2018 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Erica R. Edwards RI '18 shares her progress on her book "The Other Side of Terror: Blackness and the Culture of US Empire," which argues that the making of US empire as a way of life throughout the long war on terror has transformed contemporary black writing.

Edwards is the Presidential Term Chair in African American Literature and an associate professor of English at Rutgers University.

Red Sox Nation: Exploring Sports and Citizenship

May 9, 2018
Red Sox Nation: Exploring Sports and Citizenship

Sports and community identity are deeply linked. What happens on the field and in the stands draws attention to larger issues confronting society and compels athletes and teams to think about their roles and responsibilities in their communities.

As the 2018 Major League Baseball season gets under way, the Hall of Fame pitcher Pedro Martínez and Boston Red Sox executives discuss how the Red Sox organization endeavors to engage with the community and to support good citizenship by the team and all of Red Sox Nation.

PARTICIPANTS:
Sam Kennedy, president and CEO, Boston Red Sox

Rebekah Salwasser, executive director, Red Sox Foundation

Pedro Martínez, pitcher (1998–2004), Boston Red Sox; inductee, National Baseball Hall of Fame (2015); eight-time All-Star; three-time winner, Cy Young Award; sports analyst; and author

Moderated by Shira Springer, sports and society reporter, WBUR

Introduced by Anthony Brooks, senior political reporter, WBUR

The Sleep-Deprived Human Brain | Nora Volkow

May 2, 2018
The Sleep-Deprived Human Brain | Nora Volkow

The Sleep-Deprived Human Brain
A presentation by Nora D. Volkow

There is increased recognition that sleep deprivation interferes with cognition and performance and that it may contribute to brain diseases such as addiction, chronic pain, and Alzheimer's, among others. This presentation focuses on results from two sets of brain-imaging studies done to investigate the effects of sleep deprivation on the human brain.

This is a 2017–2018 Kim and Judy Davis Dean's Lecture in the Sciences.

Any reference in this lecture on the Radcliffe website or otherwise to Dr. Volkow, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, or the National Institutes of Health, should not be viewed as an endorsement of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study or its products or services.

The Alzheimer Enigma: The Causes of the Dementia Epidemic | Albert Hofman

May 2, 2018
The Alzheimer Enigma, The Causes of the Dementia Epidemic by Albert Hofman

As part of the 2017–2018 Epidemics Science Lecture Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Albert Hofman uses findings from the large international Alzheimer Cohorts Consortium to address important questions about Alzheimer’s and dementia.

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