An Energy Plan the Earth Can Live With | Daniel M. Kammen

February 11, 2019
An Energy Plan the Earth Can Live With by Daniel M. Kammen

Daniel M. Kammen examines the pace of scientific change, the problem of sustained innovation and deployment, and the tremendous array of benefits that could be realized by making climate protection the priority it must become. Most remarkable, perhaps, is the range of benefits—in social equity, ethnic and gender inclusivity, cultural diversity, and poverty alleviation—that can be realized through an energy plan Earth can live with.

This event is part of The Undiscovered Science Lecture Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University.

Socialite-Activists and the Black Freedom Struggle | Tanisha C. Ford

February 11, 2019
Socialite-Activists and the Black Freedom Struggle by Tanisha C. Ford

As part of the 2018–2019 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Tanisha C. Ford RI ’19 presents “The Glamorous Life: Socialite-Activists and the Black Freedom Struggle from World War II to the Age of Obama,” the first economic history of the civil rights movement to explore how black women activists raised millions of dollars for movement organizations by hosting lavish galas, fashion shows, and beauty pageants for an interracial audience.

Jacob S. Hacker | Plutocrats with Pitchforks

January 10, 2019
Jacob S. Hacker, Plutocrats with Pitchforks

As part of the 2018–2019 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Jacob S. Hacker RI '19 recognizes that there is something very distinctive and strange about right-wing populism in the United States. Stepping back from the rhetoric, Hacker focuses on what our government has actually been doing over the past couple of years.

Hacker is the Stanley B. Resor Professor of Political Science and director of the Institution for Social and Policy Studies at Yale University. He is the 2018–2019 Perrin Moorhead Grayson and Bruns Grayson Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

Birth and the Nation: A Fictional History of Immigration | Stephanie DeGooyer

January 10, 2019
Birth and the Nation: A Fictional History of Immigration by Stephanie DeGooyer

As part of the 2018–2019 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Stephanie DeGooyer RI '19 argues that the novel can help us rethink the mythologies that perpetuate the coupling of nationality and birth and rediscover alternative—and perhaps more inclusive—principles to relate to those beyond the borders of our limited national geography and political imagination.

DeGooyer is an assistant professor of English at Willamette University. Her research focuses on intersections among transatlantic literature, law, and political philosophy, especially with regard to citizenship and immigration. She is the 2018–2019 Frieda L. Miller Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

Francisco Goldman | A Reading from a Work in Progress

December 20, 2018
Francisco Goldman presents  A Reading from a Work in Progress

As part of the 2018–2019 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Francisco Goldman RI '19 reads material hot off the press from his forthcoming novel, having finished it just two days prior.

Goldman is the author of four published novels and two nonfiction books. His previous novel, Say Her Name (Grove Press, 2011), won the prestigious Prix Femina étranger in 2011. His recent memoir, The Interior Circuit: A Mexico City Chronicle (Grove Press, 2014), was awarded the 2017 Premio Metropolis Azul. He is the 2018–2019 Radcliffe Institute Fellow.

The Meaning of the Midterms: Who Counted? Who Voted?

December 20, 2018
The Meaning of the Midterms: Who Counted? Who Voted?

The year 2018 will be remembered for its surge in women's candidacies. Whether through individual, high-profile victories or the sheer force of hundreds upon hundreds of women standing for office, the midterm electoral cycle reflected options at the local, state, and national levels that were starkly different from any that Americans have confronted before at the ballot box. This panel offers an analysis of the election results through a diverse set of perspectives—academic, experiential, gendered, generational, geographic, and political—to enhance our understanding of the roles of and results for women, people of color, immigrants, and other historically underrepresented groups.

Introduced by Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean, Radcliffe Institute; Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law, Harvard Law School; professor of history, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

SPEAKERS
(11:22) Aimee Allison, president, Democracy in Color

(22:39) Sarah Lenti, board member, Serve America Movement, and political consultant

(31:55) Katherine J. Cramer, professor of political science, University of Wisconsin–Madison

(39:31) Robert O. Self RI '08, Mary Ann Lippitt Professor of American History, Brown University

Moderated by Asma Khalid, political reporter, NPR

PANEL DISCUSSION (50:23)
AUDIENCE Q&A (1:07:05)

This is a 2018–2019 Kim and Judy Davis Dean's Lecture.

Where We Stand in Earthquake Prediction | Marine A. Denolle

December 13, 2018
Where We Stand in Earthquake Prediction by Marine A. Denolle

As part of the 2018–2019 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Marine A. Denolle RI '19 expresses her hope that—with new methods, through harnessing the data, and by expanding on short-term term forecasting—one day we may potentially be able to predict an earthquake.

Denolle is a seismologist focused on understanding large earthquakes and their resulting ground motion. Her research has mostly investigated the seismic radiation from large plate-boundary earthquakes and the amplification of their ground motion in the urban sedimentary basin. She is an assistant professor of earth and planetary sciences in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences and a 2018–2019 Radcliffe Alumnae Fellow.

Next in Evolution | Alicia R. Martin

December 4, 2018
Next in Evolution, Alicia R. Martin

GENETIC PREDICTION OF TRAITS AND DISEASES ACROSS DIVERSE POPULATIONS
Alicia R. Martin, research fellow, Massachusetts General Hospital and Broad Institute

In 2018–2019, the Next in Science series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study focused on innovative research in the study of evolution. The analysis of genetic change examines both historic and current adaptations: how past species evolved over long periods of time and how modern species continue to adjust to present-day conditions.

The Next in Science series provides an opportunity for early-career scientists whose innovative, cross-disciplinary research is thematically linked to introduce their work to one another, to fellow scientists, and to nonspecialists from Harvard and the greater Boston area.

Next in Evolution | Catherine E. Wagner

December 4, 2018
Next in Evolution, Catherine E. Wagner

THE EVOLUTION OF DIVERSITY IN EAST AFRICAN CICHLID FISHES
Catherine E. Wagner, assistant professor, Department of Botany and Biodiversity Institute, University of Wyoming

In 2018–2019, the Next in Science series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study focused on innovative research in the study of evolution. The analysis of genetic change examines both historic and current adaptations: how past species evolved over long periods of time and how modern species continue to adjust to present-day conditions.

The Next in Science series provides an opportunity for early-career scientists whose innovative, cross-disciplinary research is thematically linked to introduce their work to one another, to fellow scientists, and to nonspecialists from Harvard and the greater Boston area.

Next in Evolution | James S. Santangelo

December 4, 2018
Next in Evolution, James S. Santangelo

EVOLUTION OF LIFE IN THE CITY
James S. Santangelo, graduate student in evolutionary ecology, University of Toronto Mississauga

In 2018–2019, the Next in Science series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study focused on innovative research in the study of evolution. The analysis of genetic change examines both historic and current adaptations: how past species evolved over long periods of time and how modern species continue to adjust to present-day conditions.

The Next in Science series provides an opportunity for early-career scientists whose innovative, cross-disciplinary research is thematically linked to introduce their work to one another, to fellow scientists, and to nonspecialists from Harvard and the greater Boston area.

Pages