Colleges, COVID-19, and a Time of Racial Reckoning

November 24, 2020
The Impact of 2020 on Higher Education: Colleges, COVID-19, and a Time of Racial Reckoning. Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

The Impact of 2020 on Higher Education: Colleges, COVID-19, and a Time of Racial Reckoning

How should universities respond to the many crises facing our nation and our students today? COVID-19, protests for racial justice, and structural inequality all directly affect student populations, with disproportionate impact on communities of color and those from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Speakers on this panel discuss the challenges faced by students today, the role of university presidents and leadership during turbulent times, and the ethical costs of upward mobility in higher education. Join us to explore how higher education can and should rise to the challenges of 2020 and beyond.

PANELISTS:
Eddie R. Cole, associate professor of higher education and organizational change, School of Education & Information Studies, UCLA

Anthony Abraham Jack, Shutzer Assistant Professor, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and assistant professor of education, Harvard Graduate School of Education

Jennifer M. Morton, associate professor of philosophy and core faculty in the Philosophy, Politics and Economics Program, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

MODERATOR:
Kemeyawi Wahpepah, PhD student, Harvard Graduate School of Education

This program is presented as part of the presidential initiative on Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery, a University-wide effort housed at the Radcliffe Institute.

Benefiting from the Human Genome | Anne Wojcicki

November 23, 2020
Benefiting from the Human Genome. Anne Wojcicki and Jonathan Zittrain. 2020–2021 Kim and Judy Davis Dean’s Lecture in the Sciences

Benefiting from the Human Genome
2020–2021 Kim and Judy Davis Dean's Lecture in the Sciences

In 2006, Anne Wojcicki cofounded 23andMe to help people access, understand, and benefit from the human genome, and she now serves as the company's CEO. In this Radcliffe Institute program, Wojcicki discusses the evolving benefits of genomic science, including the company's crowdsourced research platform. This platform has played a role in creating one of the largest COVID-19 research studies, exploring whether genetics plays a role in the severity or susceptibility to the virus, and is helping to drive the discovery of novel, genetically validated therapeutic targets to bring new medicines to patients.

SPEAKER
Anne Wojcicki (5:43), cofounder and CEO, 23andMe

MODERATOR
Jonathan Zittrain (26:09), George Bemis Professor of International Law and vice dean for library and information resources, Harvard Law School; faculty director, Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University; professor of computer science, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; and professor, Harvard Kennedy School

Antiracism in Higher Education: A Conversation with Ibram X. Kendi

November 23, 2020
Antiracism in Higher Education: A Conversation with Ibram X. Kendi. Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

Join us for a discussion about antiracism in higher education with Ibram X. Kendi, the award-winning author of the New York Times bestseller How to Be an Antiracist (One World, 2019). Kendi, currently the Frances B. Cashin Fellow at Harvard's Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, is joined in conversation with Radcliffe Institute Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin and Harvard College Dean Rakesh Khurana, after which they explore questions posed by current Harvard College students.

PARTICIPANTS:
Ibram X. Kendi RI '21 (4:49), founding director of the Center for Antiracist Research and Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities, Boston University

Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University; Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law, Harvard Law School; professor of history, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences; and chair, Presidential Committee on Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery

Rakesh Khurana, Danoff Dean, Harvard College; professor of sociology, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences; and Marvin Bower Professor of Leadership Development, Harvard Business School

This program is a collaboration between the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and the Harvard College Everywhere program.

Part of the 2020–2021 Fellows' Presentation Series

Shrill | Tina Tallon

November 23, 2020
Radcliffe Institute Fellow's Lecture by Tina Tallon

As a Radcliffe Institute fellow, Tina Tallon is working on both a book and an interactive multimedia chamber opera, Shrill, which will explore the social history of voice technology and how structural bias in its development continues to influence whose stories are told and how.

Part of the 2020–2021 Fellows' Presentation Series

Unraveling the Mystery of Cosmic Acceleration | Paul Martini

November 16, 2020
Radcliffe Institute Fellow's Lecture by Paul Martini

During his year at Radcliffe, Paul Martini is working on analysis tools and data from the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument to address the mystery of cosmic acceleration. The most prevalent view is that cosmic acceleration is due to some negative pressure associated with the vacuum of space, which is commonly referred to as dark energy. Other hypotheses include a modification to the theory of gravity, that is Einstein's general theory of relativity, and an additional, scalar field that would act like an extra force of nature.

Part of the 2020–2021 Fellows' Presentation Series

Education Justice: Centering Student Voices

November 16, 2020
Education Justice: Centering Student Voices. Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

"Education Justice: Centering Student Voices" is the second in a two-part series that explores education justice in carceral settings and through nontraditional paths.

As detailed in the docuseries College behind Bars, the power of education has profound positive ripple effects, and traditional classrooms are not always accessible or attainable for all learners. This student-led panel highlights a range of educational experiences, both positive and negative, and attests to the power of education in various forms. Their stories illustrate the critical importance of meeting the needs of all students and of ensuring that our systems are reconsidered and redesigned to center compassion, equity, and opportunities for all.

SPEAKERS
Sebastian Yoon (6:21), graduate, Bard Prison Initiative, Bard College

Katie Medrano-Escobar (7:49), graduate, The Loop Lab

Zoë L. Hopkins (11:44), student, Harvard College Class of 2022

Education Justice: Why Prison Classrooms Matter

November 10, 2020
Education Justice: Why Prison Classrooms Matter. Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

"What college does, it helps us learn about the nation," said Rodney Spivey-Jones, a 2017 Bard College graduate currently incarcerated at Fishkill Correctional Facility in New York, in the docuseries College behind Bars. "It helps us become civic beings. It helps us understand that we have an interest in our community, that our community is a part of us and we are a part of it."

The Bard Prison Initiative and programs at other institutions of higher learning across the country have brought together teachers and learners in incarcerated spaces for years. This panel gathers faculty members, administrators, and students who have participated in such programs to discuss the critical importance of prison education and the pivotal role colleges and universities play in expanding the power of education beyond their campus.

SPEAKERS
Dyjuan Tatro (8:49), government affairs associate, Bard Prison Initiative

Zelda Roland (12:22), founding director, Yale Prison Education Initiative at Dwight Hall at Yale

Max Kenner (17:41), founder and executive director, Bard Prison Initiative

Craig Steven Wilder (22:22), Barton L. Weller Professor of History, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MODERATOR
Lynette Nicole Tannis (5:04), adjunct lecturer on education, Harvard Graduate School of Education; author, Educating Incarcerated Youth: Exploring the Impact of Relationships, Expectations, Resources and Accountability (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014)

Architects of Peace | Alaa Murabit

November 9, 2020
Radcliffe Institute, Fellow's Lecture by Alaa Murabit

During her fellowship year, Alaa Murabit is working on "Architects of Peace: Redefining the Role of Women in Today's Growing Security Agenda," focusing on the unique roles and leadership women have in conflict resolution and global peacebuilding. She previously founded and spearheaded the Voice of Libyan Women at the age of 21. Her TED Talk, "What My Religion Really Says about Women," has been viewed more than 5 million times.

Part of the 2020–2021 Fellows' Presentation Series

They Never Can Jail Us All | Michael Honey

November 6, 2020
Radcliffe Institute Fellow's Lecture, Michael K. Honey

Written from the perspective of a first-person organizer as well as of a historian, "They Never Can Jail Us All: Repression, Resistance, and the Freedom Struggle, a Memoir and History (1960–1976)" takes us into jails, into struggles against repressive laws and police violence, and into campaigns to free Angela Davis and all political prisoners—asking throughout, What is past and what is present in the struggle to be free?

Part of the 2020–2021 Fellows' Presentation Series

Obesity, COVID-19, and Systemic Racism

November 5, 2020
Virtual Radcliffe, Obesity, COVID-19, and Systemic Racism

The health of Black people and communities across the nation has been—and, during the global pandemic, continues to be—significantly impacted by America's history of slavery and by ongoing systemic oppression. Disparities in obesity and the differing frameworks that public health officials and the public bring to the issue of obesity are powerful examples of such legacies of slavery in the United States.

This program explores how the historically rooted and uneven distribution of social supports drive obesity; how framing the disease as an individual rather than societal health concern affects policy; and how an ongoing lack of research and data fuels speculation that may reinforce racist stereotypes and prevent meaningful change. Panelists also discuss how such considerations frame the national response to the pandemic, as people of color suffer and die disproportionately from COVID-19.

SPEAKERS:
Sabrina Strings (5:02), associate professor of sociology, University of California, Irvine

Sara Bleich (13:59), Carol K. Pforzheimer Professor and director of the social sciences program, Radcliffe Institute, and professor of public health policy, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health

Related reading: Sabrina Strings, "It's Not Obesity. It's Slavery." (New York Times, May 25, 2020)

This program is presented as part of the presidential initiative on Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery, a University-wide effort housed at the Radcliffe Institute. Find out more at https://www.legacyofslavery.radcliffe.harvard.edu.

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