Mzansi's Other Voices | Bongani Ndodana-Breen

February 12, 2020
Mzansi's Other Voices by Bongani Ndodana-Breen

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Bongani Ndodana-Breen RI '20 challenges entrenched notions about the value of indigenous African culture in the discourse on South African classical music and its historic lack of representation of black composers.

Contained in this presentation is a musical recording of Fela Sowande's "African Suite for Strings" and a video recording of a ritual dance by Mozambique's Nyanga Nyengwe community.

Classical Improvisation, Composition, and Creative Dissent | Gabriela Montero

February 4, 2020
Classical Improvisation, Composition, and Creative Dissent by Gabriela Montero

The internationally renowned pianist Gabriela Montero discusses her evolution as an improvisational artist and creative dissenter. Her growth as an artist and leader has been greatly informed by the human rights and political crises in her home country of Venezuela. Joining her in conversation is the baritone and music producer Sam McElroy.

This is a 2019–2020 Kim and Judy Davis Dean's Lecture in the Arts.

The Rise of the Milky Way | João Alves

January 7, 2020
The Rise of the Milky Way by João Alves

As part of the 2018–2019 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the astrophysicist João Alves RI '19 explains how an exhibition by the artist Anna Von Mertens helped guide him to the "Radcliffe wave" findings published in Nature in January 2020.

Alves is a professor of stellar astrophysics at the University of Vienna, in Austria. He was the 2018–2019 Edward, Frances, and Shirley B. Daniels Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

Civilizing the Internet of Things | Francine Berman

January 7, 2020
Civilizing the Internet of Things by Francine Berman

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a deeply interconnected ecosystem of billions of devices and systems that are transforming commerce, science, and society. As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Francine Berman RI '20 explores the larger social and environmental ecosystem needed to develop an IoT that maximizes benefits, minimizes risk, and promotes individual protections, the public good, and planetary responsibility.

Berman is the Edward P. Hamilton Distinguished Professor in Computer Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). She is the 2019–2020 Katherine Hampson Bessell Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

The Call of Migratory Things | Nina McConigley

January 7, 2020
The Call of Migratory Things by Nina McConigley

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Nina McConigley RI '20 prepares the listener with some background for her upcoming novel before reading from the work in progress.

McConigley is a fiction writer and an assistant professor at the University of Wyoming. She is the 2019–2020 Walter Jackson Bate Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

Making Pig-to-Human Transplantation a Clinical Reality | Luhan Yang

January 7, 2020
Making Pig-to-Human Transplantation a Clinical Reality by Luhan Yang

Xenotransplantation is a promising strategy for addressing the shortage of organs for human transplantation. Using CRISPR-Cas9, Luhan Yang, the cofounder and CEO of QihanBio, has helped create a genome editing platform that addresses many of the concerns over pig-to-human immunological compatibility and the risk of cross-species transmission of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs). Join Yang as she shares her mission to create a new world in which no patient has to die while waiting for an organ transplant.

This event is part of the Gene Editing Science Lecture Series and the Unknown and Solitary Seas Gallery Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University.

The Lost Book of Moses: The Hunt for the World's Oldest Bible | Chanan Tigay

January 7, 2020
The Lost Book of Moses: The Hunt for the World's Oldest Bible by Chanan Tigay

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Chanan Tigay RI '20 shares some backstory before reading a passage from his first book, The Lost Book of Moses: The Hunt for the World's Oldest Bible (Ecco, 2016), about the oldest Bible in the world, how its outing as a fraud led to a scandalous death, and why archaeologists now believe it was real—if only they could find it.

Tigay is an award-winning journalist and nonfiction writer. He is a 2019–2020 fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University, where he is working on a new book.

Adoption of Effective Practices in Schools | Todd Rogers

December 16, 2019
Adoption of Effective Practices in Schools | Todd Rogers

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Todd Rogers RI ’20 illustrates a selection of randomized control trials that are designed to help determine what works and what doesn’t when developing scalable interventions that are intended to increase the adoption of welfare-enhancing innovations and practices. Rogers is a behavioral scientist who is a professor of public policy at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS). He is the 2019–2020 Lillian Gollay Knafel Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

Breaking My Silence: Amplifying Our Voices as “Others” | Neal Hovelmeier

December 16, 2019
Breaking My Silence: Amplifying Our Voices as “Others” | Neal Hovelmeier

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Neal Hovelmeier RI ’20 shares his insights about how people living on the margins of society struggle to use their voices against the forces that seek to silence them. The story of his coming out, a decision that made him a target of public outcry—including death threats—and forced him to resign from his job at a top Zimbabwean school, starts on a sweltering Thursday morning in September 2018. “The city was awash with the pale indigo of the jacaranda trees,” he says. “And there's an old proverb, which says that jacaranda time is madness time.”

Hovelmeier is a Zimbabwe-based writer, educator, and academic who writes fiction under the pseudonym Ian Holding. He is the 2019–2020 Robert G. James Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

The Sex Crimes Paradox | Corey Rayburn Yung

December 16, 2019
The Sex Crimes Paradox | Corey Rayburn Yung

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Corey Rayburn Yung RI ’20 argues that the failure to have healthy dialogues about sex, consent, and sexual violence has created and continues to create the cultural and legal dysfunction we see today.

Yung is the William R. Scott Research Professor at the University of Kansas School of Law. He is the 2019–2020 Lisa Goldberg Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

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