Dawnland Panel Discussion

October 15, 2018
Dawnland Panel Discussion

This panel discussion followed a screening of the feature-length documentary Dawnland.

For much of the 20th century, child welfare authorities removed Native American children from their tribal homes, devastating parents and denying children their traditions, culture, and identity. Dawnland chronicles the first official truth and reconciliation commission in the United States for Native Americans and explores the possibilities of healing and reconciliation.

This event was cosponsored by the Harvard University Native American Program and the Program on Negotiation at the Harvard Law School.

SPEAKERS:
Esther Anne, codirector, Maine-Wabanaki REACH

Adam Mazo, codirector, Dawnland, and director, Upstander Project

Ronald Niezen, 2018–2019 William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies, Canada Program, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University; Katharine A. Pearson Chair in Civil Society and Public Policy, Faculties of Law and Arts, and professor, Department of Anthropology, McGill University

Moderated by Robert T. Anderson, 2018–2019 Oneida Indian Nation Visiting Professor of Law, Harvard Law School; director of the Native American Law Center and professor, University of Washington School of Law

Introduced by Shelly Lowe, executive director, Harvard University Native American Program

A Conversation with Scott McCloud

October 15, 2018
A Conversation with Scott McCloud

This conversation followed the lecture "Visual Storytelling, Visual Communication" by Scott McCloud, a 2018–2019 Dean's Lecture in the Humanities at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University.

SPEAKERS:
Scott McCloud, cartoonist and comics theorist

Discussant: Shigehisa (Hisa) Kuriyama, faculty director of the humanities program, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and Reischauer Institute Professor of Cultural History, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Grand Old Women and Modern Girls | Corinne T. Field

October 9, 2018
Grand Old Women and Modern Girls by Corinne T. Field

As part of the 2018–2019 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Corinne T. Field RI '19 explores the history of generational and racial conflict in the US women's rights movement from 1870 to 1920.

Field is an associate professor of women, gender, and sexuality at the University of Virginia. Her research explores the intersections of age, gender, and race in US history, focusing in particular on the political dimensions of adulthood in debates over women's rights and racial justice. She is the 2018–2019 Mellon-Schlesinger Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

Feminisms Now! | A Schlesinger Library 75th Anniversary Event

October 2, 2018
Feminisms Now!, A Schlesinger Library 75th Anniversary Event

This panel, presented in partnership with VIDA: Women in the Literary Arts, in celebration of Schlesinger Library's 75th anniversary and the 10th anniversary of the VIDA count, invited rising artists, thinkers, and organizers to share their visions of gender equality for the 21st century. Panelists reflect on their art and activism in the service of intersecting and sometimes competing feminisms.

INTRODUCED BY
Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study; Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law, Harvard Law School; and professor of history, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Jane Kamensky, Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Foundation Director, Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, Radcliffe Institute; and Jonathan Trumbull Professor of American History, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

FEATURING
Fatimah Asghar (15:43), poet and screenwriter

Dana Bolger (23:18), cofounder, Know Your IX

Melissa Febos (32:23), assistant professor of creative writing, Monmouth University

Kimberly Foster (44:17), cultural critic and founder, For Harriet

Emi Koyama (57:28), activist, writer, and rogue intellectual

Moderated by Robert Reid-Pharr, professor of studies of women, gender, and sexuality, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

PANEL DISCUSSION (01:16:28)

AUDIENCE Q&A (01:31:54)

Feeling the Way to Truth | Christia Mercer

September 25, 2018
Feeling the Way to Truth by Christia Mercer

As part of the 2017–2018 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Christia Mercer RI '19 argues that we need to rethink core assumptions about the development of modern philosophy and that the writings of women played a much more significant role in its development than has been recognized.

Mercer is the Gustave M. Berne Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University, general editor of the Oxford Philosophical Concepts series, and coeditor of Oxford New Histories of Philosophy, a book series devoted to making philosophy more inclusive. She is the 2018–2019 Mildred Londa Weisman Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

Filling in the Gaps | 3D-Printed Biomaterial Implants

August 22, 2018
Filling in the Gaps, 3D-Printed Biomaterial Implants

Does an engineered material that actually becomes part of the body to replace the use of metal in treating bone defects sound futuristic? It's not. The biomedical engineer Hala Zreiqat RI '17 is working on just that, with help from the Harvard College student and Radcliffe Research Partner Linh Nam '20, a potential beneficiary of this revolutionary technology.

Hillary Rodham Clinton | Radcliffe Day 2018

May 31, 2018
Hillary Rodham Clinton | Radcliffe Day 2018

On Radcliffe Day 2018, Friday, May 25, we awarded the Radcliffe Medal to Hillary Rodham Clinton (1:32:14).

As an attorney, a first lady, a senator, a secretary of state, and the first woman nominated by a major party for the US presidency, Secretary Clinton has worked tirelessly over the course of decades in the public eye, often under unprecedented scrutiny, to make meaningful change.

Radcliffe Day features a personal tribute to Secretary Clinton delivered by the global affairs trailblazer, former secretary of state, and 2001 Radcliffe Medalist Madeleine Albright (35:09) and a wide-ranging keynote conversation between Secretary Clinton and Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey '92 (46:45).

Introduction by Lizabeth Cohen, dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and the Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies at Harvard University

Toward a New Global Architecture? America’s Role in a Changing World | Radcliffe Day 2018

May 31, 2018
Toward a New Global Architecture? America’s Role in a Changing World | Radcliffe Day 2018

Radcliffe Day 2018 opens with a panel titled "Toward a New Global Architecture? America's Role in a Changing World." In 2009, then–Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton outlined a vision for a global architecture "in which states have clear incentives to cooperate and live up to their responsibilities, as well as strong disincentives to sit on the sidelines or sow discord and division." Nearly a decade later, the United States is still grappling with complex questions about its role in global affairs.

Nicholas Burns (10:29), the Roy and Barbara Goodman Family Professor of the Practice of Diplomacy and International Relations at Harvard Kennedy School and a career diplomat who served as US ambassador to NATO and undersecretary of state for political affairs, moderates a discussion exploring these issues. The panel features the foreign policy experts Michèle Flournoy '83, David Ignatius '72, Meghan O'Sullivan, and Anne-Marie Slaughter JD '85.

Introduction by Lizabeth Cohen, dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and the Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies at Harvard University

Algorithmic Accountability: Designing for Safety | Ben Shneiderman

May 22, 2018
Algorithmic Accountability: Designing for Safety by Ben Shneiderman

Vital services such as communications, financial trading, health care, and transportation depend on sophisticated algorithms. Some rely on unpredictable artificial intelligence techniques, such as deep learning, that are increasingly embedded in complex software systems. As high-speed trading, medical devices, and autonomous aircraft become more widely used, stronger checks are necessary to prevent failures. Design strategies that promote comprehensible, predictable, and controllable human-centered systems can increase safety and make failure investigations more effective. Social strategies that support human-centered independent oversight during planning, continuous monitoring during operation, and retrospective analyses following failures can play a powerful role in making more reliable and trustworthy systems. Clarifying responsibility for failures stimulates improved design thinking.

Ben Shneiderman is a Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Computer Science and the founding director (1983–2000) of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory at the University of Maryland, where he is also a member of the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies.

This event is cosponsored by the Harvard Data Science Initiative.

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