Show and Tell: An Evening about Citizenship with Documentary Filmmakers

April 25, 2018
Show and Tell: An Evening about Citizenship with Documentary Filmmakers

The Radcliffe Institute conference "Who Belongs? Global Citizenship and Gender in the 21st Century" opens with a discussion about questions of citizenship and gender as expressed through film.

Three prominent filmmakers and a film critic discuss the portrayed (and real) experiences of women, men, and people of color as they seek the most fundamental rights of citizenship.

WELCOMING REMARKS
Lizabeth Cohen, dean, Radcliffe Institute, and Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies, Department of History, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

CITIZENSHIP, GENDER, AND FILM (8:38)
(13:17) Cynthia López, former commissioner, City of New York Mayor's Office of Media and Entertainment; former executive vice president and co–executive producer, American Documentary and POV

(28:59) Heather Courtney, documentary filmmaker

(46:27) María Agui Carter, writer/director; assistant professor, Department of Visual and Media Arts, Emerson College

Moderated by Claudia Puig, president, Los Angeles Film Critics Association; former lead film critic, USA Today

PANEL DISCUSSION (1:06:16)
AUDIENCE Q&A (1:29:45)

The Writer and the Critic: Marilynne Robinson and James Wood in Conversation

April 24, 2018
The Writer and the Critic: Marilynne Robinson and James Wood in Conversation

The Pulitzer Prize–winning author Marilynne Robinson (10:52)—acclaimed for the novels Housekeeping (1980), Gilead (2004), Home (2008), and Lila (2014)—participates in a conversation with the literary critic James Wood, professor of the practice of literary criticism at Harvard University and a staff writer at the New Yorker magazine.

Introduction by Lizabeth Cohen, dean, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

This is the 2017–2018 Julia S. Phelps Annual Lecture in the Arts and Humanities.

Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters) | Clarissa Tossin

April 23, 2018
Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters) by Clarissa Tossin

As part of the 2017–2018 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Clarissa Tossin RI '18 shares a collection of her works that are linked together by the common themes of circulation and displacement, spanning a period of almost 10 years.

Tossin is an interdisciplinary artist based in Los Angeles, California.

Cultivating Art in a Garden on Brattle Street

April 17, 2018
Cultivating Art in a Garden on Brattle Street

On one of Cambridge's toniest streets, just across the road from the A.R.T., there is a rotating public art space called the Wallach Garden. Since 2013, the Radcliffe Institute Public Art Competition has brought three bold designs to life in this space. Now a fourth winning design has been announced, due to appear in 2019.

The Drama of Celebrity | Sharon Marcus

April 12, 2018
The Drama of Celebrity by Sharon Marcus

As part of the 2017–2018 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Sharon Marcus RI '18 shares material from her soon-to-be-completed book, in which she addresses such questions as "What is a celebrity?" "Have they always existed?" "And why do so many people care about them?"

Marcus teaches at Columbia University, where she is the Orlando Harriman Professor of English and Comparative Literature, specializing in 19th-century British and French culture. She is the 2017–2018 Elizabeth S. and Richard M. Cashin Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

Obesity: It’s More Complex than You Think | Fatima Cody Stanford

April 10, 2018
Obesity: It’s More Complex than You Think by Fatima Cody Stanford

As part of the 2017–2018 Epidemics Science Lecture Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Fatima Cody Stanford (2:20), a leading expert on obesity, challenges the notion that weight regulation can be determined by a simple equation applied to all persons equally and instead explores the impact of the environment and the role our brains and bodies play in the complex processes of weight regulation.

Introduction by Janet Rich-Edwards, faculty codirector of the science program, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study; associate professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School; and associate professor, Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Layli Long Soldier | WHEREAS

April 4, 2018
Layli Long Soldier presents WHEREAS

The poet and artist Layli Long Soldier presents WHEREAS, a poetry reading (6:26) and discussion featuring Nick Estes (45:24).

Introductions by
Daniel Carpenter, faculty director of the social sciences program, Radcliffe Institute, and Allie S. Freed Professor of Government, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Nick Estes, fellow, Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History, Harvard University; cofounder, the Red Nation

This event is part of the Roosevelt Poetry Readings at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and is cosponsored by the Harvard University Native American Program (HUNAP). The Roosevelt Poetry Readings are made possible by a donor gift that helps bring poets of recognized stature to the Institute.

Citizen Indigenous

April 3, 2018
Citizen Indigenous

Leading members from the Oneida Nation, Citizen Potawatomi Nation, and United Houma Nation of Louisiana discuss vital issues of tribal citizenship in Indian Country. By exploring topics such as constitutional reform, tribal enrollment, blood quantum, and descendancy, the speakers discuss the many different ways Native tribes and nations define, grant, and express indigenous citizenship.

FEATURING
Norbert Hill (Oneida Nation) (40:08), former director of education, Oneida Nation of Wisconsin; founder, Winds of Change, American Indian Science and Engineering Society, and The American Indian Graduate Magazine, American Indian Graduate Center; Lifetime Achievement Award, National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering

Olivia Hoeft (Oneida Nation) (10:00), associate product marketing manager, Google; former Miss Oneida, 2014–2015

Tesia Zientek (Citizen Potawatomi Nation) (21:07), director, Department of Education, Citizen Potawatomi Nation

Moderated by N. Bruce Duthu (United Houma Nation of Louisiana) (8:15), Samson Occom Professor of Native American Studies and Frank J. Guarini Associate Dean of the Faculty for International Studies & Interdisciplinary Programs, Dartmouth College

Introduced by
Sean O'Donnell, associate director of Academic Ventures, Radcliffe Institute

Shelly Lowe (Navajo) (2:01), executive director, Harvard University Native American Program

PANEL DISCUSSION (1:01:24)
AUDIENCE Q&A (1:11:14)

This program was cosponsored by the Harvard University Native American Program and the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development's Honoring Nations program.

Thankfull

April 2, 2018
Bill of Sale for Thankfull

In this first installment of Unboxing History, Marlin Kann—an AP US history teacher at Cambridge Rindge and Latin School who wants to broaden his students' understanding of history—marvels at a creased and weathered document from 1803 that held the fate of a 23-year-old woman. The simple, soundless video, to which we have added voiceover, is one of dozens that Kann shot as he opened archival library boxes in hopes of demystifying archival work students of history. 

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UNBOXING HISTORY: This series of short videos explores the riches of the Radcliffe's Schlesinger Library, which is widely regarded as the foremost collection on the history of women in the United States. The simple footage is captured as archives are unboxed by historians and others. UNBOXING HISTORY gives you a front row seat as we explore historic documents and objects.

“Memories from Resistance” | Sophie Hochhäusl

March 20, 2018
“Memories from Resistance” by Sophie Hochhäusl

As part of the 2017–2018 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Sophie Hochhäusl RI '18 presents "'Memories from Resistance': Women, War, and the Forgotten Work of Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky, 1919–1989." By charting Schütte-Lihotzky's work, including her political activism, Hochhäusl's talk highlights new networks of exchange and expertise among women, along with the agency of social movements in design histories.

Hochhäusl is an architect and architectural historian whose scholarly work centers on modern architecture and urban culture in Austria, Germany, and the United States with a focus on environmental history, women and gender studies, and the history of social movements. She is an assistant professor of modern architecture in the Department of History of Art and Architecture at Boston University and the 2017–2018 Frieda L. Miller Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

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