Book Talk: A’Lelia Bundles

August 18, 2020
Radcliffe book talk: A'Lelia Bundles

A'Lelia Bundles, author of Self Made: Inspired by the Life of Madam C.J. Walker (originally titled On Her Own Ground: The Life and Times of Madam C.J. Walker [Scribner, 2001]), joins us as part of our summer series Virtual Radcliffe Book Talks, in which we explore recent publications whose subjects or authors have a connection with the Radcliffe Institute.

Following a brief reading, Bundles joins in discussion with Tomiko Brown-Nagin—dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard Law School, professor of history in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and chair of the Presidential Committee on Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery at Harvard University—and takes part in an audience Q and A.

Book Talk: Gish Jen

August 12, 2020
Radcliffe book talk: Gish Jen

Gish Jen '77, BI '87, RI '02, author of The Resisters (Knopf, 2020), joins us as part of our summer series of Virtual Radcliffe Book Talks, in which we explore recent publications whose subjects or authors have a connection with the Radcliffe Institute.

Following a brief reading, Jen is joined in conversation with Margot Livesey RI '13—a professor of fiction at the Iowa Writers' Workshop and the author of nine novels, including, most recently, The Boy in the Field (Harper, 2020)—and takes part in an audience Q and A.

Book Talk: Michael Pollan

July 30, 2020
Radcliffe Book Talk: Michael Pollan

Michael Pollan, author of Caffeine: How Coffee and Tea Created the Modern World (Audible Originals, 2020), joins us as part of our summer series Virtual Radcliffe Book Talks, in which we explore recent publications whose subjects or authors have a connection with the Radcliffe Institute.

Following a brief reading, Pollan joins in discussion with Tomiko Brown-Nagin—dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard Law School, professor of history in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and chair of the Presidential Committee on Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery at Harvard University—and takes part in an audience Q and A.

Book Talk: Maggie Doherty

July 20, 2020
Radcliffe Book Talk: Maggie Doherty. Artwork by Jordan Bushur

The first installment in our summer series of Virtual Radcliffe Book Talks features Maggie Doherty, author of The Equivalents: A Story of Art, Female Friendship, and Liberation in the 1960s, an exploration of fellowship and collaboration among five artists—Maxine Kumin, Tillie Olsen, Marianna Pineda, Anne Sexton, and Barbara Swan—who met in the 1960s at the then-Radcliffe Institute for Independent Study.

Doherty's reading is followed by a discussion with Tomiko Brown-Nagin—dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard Law School, professor of history in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and chair of the Presidential Committee on Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery at Harvard University—and concludes with an audience Q and A.

This event is part of the Virtual Radcliffe Book Talks which explores recent publications whose subjects or authors have a connection with the Radcliffe Institute.

Is Now the Time to Build a Better System? K–12 Education and Systemic Racism in the Era of COVID-19

July 20, 2020
Virtual Radcliffe. Is Now the Time to Build a Better System? K–12 Education and Systemic Racism in the Era of COVID-19

The coronavirus crisis and demonstrations about racial injustice have illuminated long-standing inequities in US education, conditions that have been well-documented for decades but remained unrecognized by many until now.

As public schools and districts plan for the 2020–2021 school year and beyond, should their primary aim be to recover what has been lost, returning to a pre-COVID and pre-protest baseline? Or is now the time to reinvent our public education systems to establish a new, more equitable baseline? Can and should we attempt such reform during the continuing political, health, and economic crises? If not now, when? This Radcliffe webinar, cosponsored by the Harvard Graduate School of Education, brings together experts from public school systems, foundations, and academia to explore these questions.

SPEAKERS:
Kevin Godden, superintendent and CEO, Abbotsford School District, Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada

Na'ilah Suad Nasir, president, Spencer Foundation

Justin Reich, assistant professor in the Comparative Media Studies/Writing department and director of the Teaching Systems Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MODERATED BY:
Meira Levinson, professor of education, Harvard Graduate School of Education

Amplifying Community Voices: LGBTQ Health and Wellbeing during COVID-19

July 6, 2020
virtual Radcliffe, Amplifying Community Voices: LGBTQ Health and Wellbeing during COVID-19

With Pride canceled and many other community and social supports suspended during the pandemic, COVID-19 presents particular challenges to the health and well-being of LGBTQ people, who already experience health disparities. Drawing from LGBTQ history and recent political events, this Radcliffe webinar brings together historians, physicians, and organizers to discuss the disparate impact of the pandemic on the physical and mental health of sexual and gender minorities, as they explore the resilience of queer communities in times of crisis.

SPEAKERS:
Katie Batza, associate professor and director of graduate studies, Department of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, University of Kansas

Robert Goldstein, medical director, Transgender Health Program, Massachusetts General Hospital; instructor in medicine, Harvard Medical School; candidate, US Congress (MA-08)

Jessica Halem, LGBTQ outreach and engagement director, Harvard Medical School

Cecil R. Webster, lecturer in psychiatry, McLean Hospital and Harvard Medical School; consultant for diversity health outreach programs, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and other area schools

American Policing and Protest

July 6, 2020
Virtual Radcliffe, American Policing and Protest

The recent brutal police killings of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor and the delayed criminal charges in the killing of Ahmaud Arbery have sparked outrage and protests across the United States. As the nation once again confronts police violence against people of color and communities while grappling with a long history of public indifference, the Radcliffe Institute brings together experts to examine the historical roots of policing and responses to state violence. Speakers discuss contemporary police violence against people of color along with ethical issues that we must consider as we reflect on the current turmoil and attempt to envision how our nation might be transformed.

This program is presented as part of the presidential initiative on Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery, a University-wide effort anchored at the Radcliffe Institute.

PARTICIPANTS:
Monica C. Bell, associate professor of law, Yale Law School, and associate professor of sociology, Yale University

Laurence Ralph, professor of anthropology and director of the Center on Transnational Policing, Princeton University

Brandon Terry, assistant professor of African and African American studies and of social studies, Harvard University

Decarceration and Community: COVID 19 and Beyond (Part II)

June 30, 2020
Virtual Radcliffe, Decarceration and Community: COVID 19 and Beyond (Part II)

The Radcliffe Institute is offering a two-part series of virtual programs to explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on incarcerated people.

Part II of this discussion series considers how public officials responsible for the operation of jails and prisons are responding to the current pandemic. What challenges and opportunities present themselves, given the reality of COVID-19 in carceral spaces? Responding to the issues raised by impacted people during the first session, how do we understand public health in and around carceral spaces, and how do we develop strategies to keep communities safe during the pandemic? Drawing on decades of collective experience running county jails and state prisons along with expertise in addressing health concerns within and outside such settings, the panelists will consider possible solutions, including justice reinvestment, decarceration, and early release.

SPEAKERS:
Patricia Caruso, former director, Michigan Department of Corrections

Harold Clarke, director, Virginia Department of Corrections; former director, Massachusetts Department of Correction and Nebraska Department of Correctional Services; former secretary, Washington State Department of Corrections

Homer Venters, president, Community Oriented Correctional Health Services; clinical instructor, NYU Langone Health; former chief medical officer, NYC Health + Hospitals/Correctional Health Services; former director of programs; Physicians for Human Rights

Moderated by Mary T. Bassett, director of the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights and FXB Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; former commissioner, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Music in the Moment

June 29, 2020
Virtual Radcliffe, Music in the Moment

Music has played a large social function during the coronavirus pandemic: from the daily balcony concerts in Italy to the virtual performances of countless orchestras, it has helped tie communities together where social distancing has atomized us. During this Radcliffe webinar, we talk with musicians about their experience during the crisis—from the precarious position of performers without gigs to the healing role music can play.

PARTICIPANTS:
Terri Lyne Carrington, drummer and producer; founder and artistic director, Berklee Institute of Jazz and Gender Justice

Ganavya, vocalist and composer; doctoral candidate, Department of Music, Harvard University

Vijay Iyer, composer and pianist; Franklin D. and Florence Rosenblatt Professor of the Arts, Harvard University

Rajna Swaminathan, mrudangam artist and composer; doctoral candidate, Department of Music, Harvard University

Moderated by Alexander Rehding, Fanny Peabody Professor of Music, Harvard University

VIDEO EXCERPTS:
Entrustment - ©2019 Vijay Iyer, Multiplicity Music (SESAC) All rights reserved
Recorded at ECAM, Festival Sons d'Hiver, Paris, France, January 17, 2020
Video produced by Oléo Productions/Samuel Thiebaut

Bells (Ring Loudly) by Terri Lyne Carrington and Social Science
Courtesy of Berklee College of Music

 

Art Together Now | Gala Porras-Kim

June 24, 2020
Art Together Now, Gala Porras-Kim

As we weather the COVID-19 pandemic, we are all learning how to mitigate our isolation and collective uncertainty. In moments of crisis, we turn to art not only for distraction, but also for solace. Indeed, art seems like a crucial act of joy and affirmation in this time.

For our new series #ArtTogetherNow, we challenged members of our community to use their smartphones to create art-themed videos with the simple aim of uplifting, inspiring, or amusing our interdisciplinary audience through a brief encounter with the imagination.

Here, the artist Gala Porras-Kim installs a work by the late installation artist Félix González-Torres in her Los Angeles studio.

Félix González-Torres
"Untitled" (Fortune Cookie Corner), 1990
Fortune cookies, endless supply
Overall dimensions vary with installation
Original installation: Approximately 10,000 fortune cookies

In recognition of this globally significant moment and in reflection of the ever-relevant and flexible nature of the work of González-Torres—much of which consists of participatory installations that ask viewers to take a piece with them—the Andrea Rosen Gallery and David Zwirner gallery invited Porras-Kim and 999 others to become an archival part of the total "site" of an expansive physical exhibition.

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