Naming Racism

June 5, 2020
Virtual Radcliffe, Naming Racism

The recent police killing of George Floyd was not an isolated incident but part of a history of structural and interpersonal racism inseparable from American history. The health inequities brought into devastating relief by the COVID-19 crisis are part of that same history, and they further confirm the daily and multigenerational reality of devaluation and constrained opportunity faced by communities of color in the United States. Amid nationwide unrest, deep distrust, and renewal of long-ignored calls for systemic change, how do we mobilize efforts to create a society in which the color of your skin is not the difference between life and death?

Camara Phyllis Jones RI '20 and David R. Williams explore how we might overcome, in Jones's words, "the somnolence of racism denial," dismantle the system of racism, and put in its place a system in which all people can thrive.

SPEAKERS:
Camara Phyllis Jones, 2019–2020 Evelyn Green Davis Fellow, Radcliffe Institute; adjunct professor, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University; senior fellow and adjunct associate professor, Morehouse School of Medicine

David R. Williams, Florence Sprague Norman and Laura Smart Norman Professor of Public Health and chair, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; professor of African and African American studies and of sociology, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Introduction by Tomiko Brown Nagin, dean, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study; Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law, Harvard Law School; professor of history, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Art Together Now | Anna Von Mertens, Paying Attention

June 4, 2020
Art Together Now, Anna Von Mertens, Paying Attention

As we weather the COVID-19 pandemic, we are all learning how to mitigate our isolation and collective uncertainty. In moments of crisis, we turn to art not only for distraction, but also for solace. Indeed, art seems like a crucial act of joy and affirmation in this time.

For our new series #ArtTogetherNow, we challenged members of our community to use their smartphones to create art-themed videos with the simple aim of uplifting, inspiring, or amusing our interdisciplinary audience through a brief encounter with the imagination.

Here, the artist Anna Von Mertens talks about what she is making/doing in this time of isolation: an extension of Measure, the body of work she created as a visiting artist at Radcliffe.

Art Together Now | Kathleen Ossip

May 14, 2020
Kathleen Ossip Art Together Now

As we weather the COVID-19 pandemic, we are all learning how to mitigate
our isolation and collective uncertainty. In moments of crisis, we turn to art
not only for distraction, but also for solace. Indeed, art seems like a crucial
act of joy and affirmation in this time.

For our new series #ArtTogetherNow, we challenged members of our
community to use their smartphones to create art-themed videos with the
simple aim of uplifting, inspiring, or amusing our interdisciplinary audience
through a brief encounter with the imagination.

Here, the poet Kathleen Ossip shares a poem about living things and friendship.

Art Together Now | Elise Adibi

May 14, 2020
Art Together Now Elise Adibi

As we weather the COVID-19 pandemic, we are all learning how to mitigate
our isolation and collective uncertainty. In moments of crisis, we turn to art
not only for distraction, but also for solace. Indeed, art seems like a crucial
act of joy and affirmation in this time.

For our new series #ArtTogetherNow, we challenged members of our
community to use their smartphones to create art-themed videos with the
simple aim of uplifting, inspiring, or amusing our interdisciplinary audience
through a brief encounter with the imagination.

Here, the artist Elise Adibi shares a painting inspired by respiration.

Confronting the Challenge of COVID-19 in American Indian Communities

May 14, 2020
Virtual Radcliffe, Confronting the Challenge of COVID-19 in American Indian Communities

American Indian communities in the United States have improbably survived centuries of dispossession, subjugation, endemic poverty, and coercive assimilation. The latest threat to their "survivance" is the COVID-19 epidemic. In this Virtual Radcliffe program, two Indigenous professors of medicine will consider the implications of the pandemic for lives and livelihoods in contemporary American Indian communities.

PARTICIPANTS:
Nicole Redvers (Dene, member of the Deninu K'ue First Nation Band), assistant professor in the Indians into Medicine program and in the Department of Family & Community Medicine, School of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of North Dakota

Donald Warne (Oglala Lakota), associate dean of diversity, equity and inclusion, director of the Indians Into Medicine program, and professor, Department of Family & Community Medicine, School of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of North Dakota; senior policy advisor, Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board

Moderated by Joseph P. Gone (Aaniiih-Gros Ventre tribal nation of Montana), professor of anthropology, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences, professor of global health and social medicine, Harvard Medical School, and faculty director, Harvard University Native American Program

Health, Inequity, and COVID-19

May 1, 2020
Virtual Radcliffe, Health, Inequity, and COVID-19

International experience in recent months has powerfully illustrated that the COVID-19 virus has particularly harmful and disproportionate effects on already vulnerable populations. Mary T. Bassett and Khalil Gibran Muhammad discuss inequity and public health in the time of COVID-19, exploring how the virus encounters existing inequalities, replicates these inequalities, and, in many cases, amplifies them.

PARTICIPANTS:
Mary T. Bassett '74, director of the François-Xavier Bagnoud (FXB) Center for Health and Human Rights and FXB Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Khalil Gibran Muhammad RI '20, Suzanne Young Murray Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and professor of history, race, and public policy at Harvard Kennedy School, Harvard University

Ensuring Health Equity for Persons with Disabilities

May 1, 2020
Virtual Radcliffe, Ensuring Health Equity for Persons with Disabilities

As COVID-19 threatens to push hospital resources beyond capacity, a raft of states, hospitals, and advocacy organizations have formulated protocols to address potential discrimination against persons with disabilities. Two highly influential statements by the Arc and the University of Pittsburgh are setting new standards for the ethical treatment of persons with disabilities. This Radcliffe webinar places these triaging policies within the context of the history of disability civil rights, culture, and bioethics and considers what is necessary to achieve an equitable health outcome for persons with disabilities during this time of crisis.

SPEAKERS:
Rabia Belt, associate professor, Stanford Law School

Rosemarie Garland-Thomson RI '12, professor of English and bioethics in the Department of English and codirector of the Emory Disability Studies Initiative, Emory University

Devan Stahl, assistant professor of religion, Baylor University

Joseph A. Stramondo, assistant professor, Department of Philosophy, San Diego State University

Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein | Come Together

April 9, 2020
Come Together by Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein

Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein, a former United Nations high commissioner for human rights, implores fellow advocates to go beyond their immediate community and support human rights on behalf of everyone.

Taken from his talk "The New Geopolitical Order," a 2019–2020 Kim and Judy Davis Dean's Lecture in the Social Sciences at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University.

Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein | Bullies

April 9, 2020
Bullies by Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein

Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein, a former United Nations high commissioner for human rights, asks what you're willing to do as an individual when bearing witness to fellow human beings being victimized by the bullies.

Taken from his talk "The New Geopolitical Order," a 2019–2020 Kim and Judy Davis Dean's Lecture in the Social Sciences at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University.

Music, Memes, and Digital Antiphony | Braxton D. Shelley

March 23, 2020
Music, Memes, and Digital Antiphony by Braxton D. Shelley

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Braxton D. Shelley RI '20 muses on how today's viral object will be tomorrow's afterthought—yet, he says, "the artifacts left behind reveal a pattern, a cultural logic that is hyper-significant, preoccupied with the formal engines of human sociality."

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