Art Together Now | Anna Von Mertens, Paying Attention: The Remix

June 24, 2020

As we weather the COVID-19 pandemic, we are all learning how to mitigate our isolation and collective uncertainty. In moments of crisis, we turn to art not only for distraction, but also for solace. Indeed, art seems like a crucial act of joy and affirmation in this time.

For our new series #ArtTogetherNow, we challenged members of our community to use their smartphones to create art-themed videos with the simple aim of uplifting, inspiring, or amusing our interdisciplinary audience through a brief encounter with the imagination.

Here, the artist Anna Von Mertens shows work that would have been on view currently, were it not for the global pandemic. The drawing Von Mertens discusses in this video has a small connection to Radcliffe: it is based on a text received by Meg Rotzel, Radcliffe's arts program manager, from her young daughter. This body of work, says Von Mertens, "feels particularly relevant to this current time, as it touches on our constant negotiation between the spaces of the virtual and the real."

Decarceration and Community: COVID-19 and Beyond (Part I)

June 18, 2020
Virtual Radcliffe, Decarceration and Community: COVID-19 and Beyond (Part I)

Part I of this discussion series, cosponsored with the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice, focuses on people who are incarcerated and their families, exploring how systemic racism and mass criminalization threaten both incarcerated individuals and their communities. The participants consider how recent events, including the COVID-19 crisis and the police murder of George Floyd, highlight and magnify historical inequities—with deadly results.

The panelists work directly with people affected by incarceration, including several who focus on the all-too-often neglected plight of incarcerated women and their families.

SPEAKERS:
Gina Clayton-Johnson, executive director and founder, Essie Justice Group

Soffiyah Elijah, executive director, Alliance of Families for Justice

Andrea James, founder, Families for Justice as Healing; executive director, National Council for Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Women and Girls

Zach Norris, executive director, Ella Baker Center for Human Rights

Moderated by Dehlia Umunna, clinical professor of law and faculty deputy director of the Criminal Justice Institute, Harvard Law School

When “Stay at Home” Isn’t Safe: Domestic Violence during COVID-19

June 15, 2020
Virtual Radcliffe, When “Stay at Home” Isn’t Safe: Domestic Violence during COVID-19

Although communities have been asked to stay home to stay safe, home is a dangerous place when you face domestic abuse. Spikes in intimate partner violence (IPV) and child abuse have been noted across the country and around the world since the onset of the COVID-19 stay-at-home directives as victims and witnesses of IPV and child abuse find themselves isolated within their homes and confronted with difficult decisions about when and how to seek care or shelter. In this Radcliffe webinar, scholars, public officials, community activists, and medical professionals join to discuss domestic violence in the midst of this public health crisis and to consider different strategies for providing services and help to those in need.

SPEAKERS:
Jacquelyn Campbell, professor, Anna D. Wolf Chair, and national program director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing

Melissa DuBose, associate judge, District Court, Rhode Island Judiciary

Sharon Imperato, clinical innovation projects and training director, Boston Area Rape Crisis Center

Neena McConnico, program director, Child Witness to Violence Project, Boston Medical Center

Moderated by Janet Rich-Edwards, faculty codirector of the science program, Radcliffe Institute, associate professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School, and associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Reimagining the Role of the Public Sector in the Wake of COVID-19

June 10, 2020
Virtual Radcliffe, Reimagining the Role of the Public Sector in the Wake of COVID-19

What should the "new normal" look like? With the COVID-19 crisis highlighting long-standing social disparities and vast inequities, some argue that now is the time to imagine an adaptive public health infrastructure that can readily respond to this and future epidemics. In this Radcliffe webinar, leading scholars and practitioners engage in a conversation about how to leverage the policy opportunities the epidemic presents for bold changes that could support a sustained and equitable public health response.

SPEAKERS:
María Belén Power, associate executive director, GreenRoots, Inc., and representative, Green Justice Coalition

Daniel Carpenter, faculty director of the social sciences program, Radcliffe Institute, and Allie S. Freed Professor of Government, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Sara Bleich, Carol K. Pforzheimer Professor and social sciences advisor, Radcliffe Institute, and professor, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Moderated by Janet Rich-Edwards, codirector of the science program, Radcliffe Institute, associate professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School, and associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Radcliffe Day 2020

June 9, 2020
Radcliffe Day 2020

In celebration of Radcliffe Day 2020 and the 20th anniversary of the founding of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Tomiko Brown-Nagin, current Institute dean, and Drew Gilpin Faust, Radcliffe's founding dean and president emerita of Harvard University, join each other in conversation.

In August 2000, the late Mary Maples Dunn, then acting dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, wrote a thoughtful letter to Neil L. Rudenstine, then president of Harvard University, thanking him for the "most unusual opportunity" of overseeing the transition of Radcliffe College into the newly formed Institute. Some 20 years later, we mark this important milestone in Radcliffe's history by reflecting on the Institute's founding and growth, its current strategic direction, and the critical role of an engaged, interdisciplinary institute for advanced study in our University and our world.

Naming Racism

June 5, 2020
Virtual Radcliffe, Naming Racism

The recent police killing of George Floyd was not an isolated incident but part of a history of structural and interpersonal racism inseparable from American history. The health inequities brought into devastating relief by the COVID-19 crisis are part of that same history, and they further confirm the daily and multigenerational reality of devaluation and constrained opportunity faced by communities of color in the United States. Amid nationwide unrest, deep distrust, and renewal of long-ignored calls for systemic change, how do we mobilize efforts to create a society in which the color of your skin is not the difference between life and death?

Camara Phyllis Jones RI '20 and David R. Williams explore how we might overcome, in Jones's words, "the somnolence of racism denial," dismantle the system of racism, and put in its place a system in which all people can thrive.

SPEAKERS:
Camara Phyllis Jones, 2019–2020 Evelyn Green Davis Fellow, Radcliffe Institute; adjunct professor, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University; senior fellow and adjunct associate professor, Morehouse School of Medicine

David R. Williams, Florence Sprague Norman and Laura Smart Norman Professor of Public Health and chair, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; professor of African and African American studies and of sociology, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Introduction by Tomiko Brown Nagin, dean, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study; Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law, Harvard Law School; professor of history, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Art Together Now | Anna Von Mertens, Paying Attention

June 4, 2020
Art Together Now, Anna Von Mertens, Paying Attention

As we weather the COVID-19 pandemic, we are all learning how to mitigate our isolation and collective uncertainty. In moments of crisis, we turn to art not only for distraction, but also for solace. Indeed, art seems like a crucial act of joy and affirmation in this time.

For our new series #ArtTogetherNow, we challenged members of our community to use their smartphones to create art-themed videos with the simple aim of uplifting, inspiring, or amusing our interdisciplinary audience through a brief encounter with the imagination.

Here, the artist Anna Von Mertens talks about what she is making/doing in this time of isolation: an extension of Measure, the body of work she created as a visiting artist at Radcliffe.

Art Together Now | Kathleen Ossip

May 14, 2020
Kathleen Ossip Art Together Now

As we weather the COVID-19 pandemic, we are all learning how to mitigate
our isolation and collective uncertainty. In moments of crisis, we turn to art
not only for distraction, but also for solace. Indeed, art seems like a crucial
act of joy and affirmation in this time.

For our new series #ArtTogetherNow, we challenged members of our
community to use their smartphones to create art-themed videos with the
simple aim of uplifting, inspiring, or amusing our interdisciplinary audience
through a brief encounter with the imagination.

Here, the poet Kathleen Ossip shares a poem about living things and friendship.

Art Together Now | Elise Adibi

May 14, 2020
Art Together Now Elise Adibi

As we weather the COVID-19 pandemic, we are all learning how to mitigate
our isolation and collective uncertainty. In moments of crisis, we turn to art
not only for distraction, but also for solace. Indeed, art seems like a crucial
act of joy and affirmation in this time.

For our new series #ArtTogetherNow, we challenged members of our
community to use their smartphones to create art-themed videos with the
simple aim of uplifting, inspiring, or amusing our interdisciplinary audience
through a brief encounter with the imagination.

Here, the artist Elise Adibi shares a painting inspired by respiration.

Confronting the Challenge of COVID-19 in American Indian Communities

May 14, 2020
Virtual Radcliffe, Confronting the Challenge of COVID-19 in American Indian Communities

American Indian communities in the United States have improbably survived centuries of dispossession, subjugation, endemic poverty, and coercive assimilation. The latest threat to their "survivance" is the COVID-19 epidemic. In this Virtual Radcliffe program, two Indigenous professors of medicine will consider the implications of the pandemic for lives and livelihoods in contemporary American Indian communities.

PARTICIPANTS:
Nicole Redvers (Dene, member of the Deninu K'ue First Nation Band), assistant professor in the Indians into Medicine program and in the Department of Family & Community Medicine, School of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of North Dakota

Donald Warne (Oglala Lakota), associate dean of diversity, equity and inclusion, director of the Indians Into Medicine program, and professor, Department of Family & Community Medicine, School of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of North Dakota; senior policy advisor, Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board

Moderated by Joseph P. Gone (Aaniiih-Gros Ventre tribal nation of Montana), professor of anthropology, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences, professor of global health and social medicine, Harvard Medical School, and faculty director, Harvard University Native American Program

Pages