Making the Cut | Session 1: Science and Society

November 18, 2019
Making the Cut | Session 1: Science and Society

The 2019 Radcliffe Institute science symposium is on gene editing, a technology that enables scientists to change an organism’s DNA. Leading international scientists, clinicians, and ethicists gather to explore case studies of particular gene therapies and consider the legal and bioethical implications of this research.

WELCOME
Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study; Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law, Harvard Law School; and professor of history, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

FRAMING REMARKS (
04:41)
Immaculata De Vivo, life sciences advisor, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study; professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School; and professor of epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

SESSION 1: SCIENCE AND SOCIETY (
11:47)
Introduction by moderator: Charmaine DM Royal, associate professor of African & African American studies, biology, global health, and family medicine & community health, Duke University

SCIENCE KEYTNOTE (
17:22) Sylvain Moineau, Canada Research Chair in Bacteriophages, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology, and Bio-informatics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Université Laval (Canada)

SOCIETY KEYNOTE (
37:38) Jonathan Kimmelman, James McGill Professor and director of the Biomedical Ethics Unit, Department of Social Studies of Medicine, McGill University (Canada)

PANEL DISCUSSION (
53:32)

AUDIENCE Q&A (
1:14:33)

 

The Constitution, the Court, and Social Change | Tomiko Brown-Nagin

November 5, 2019
The Constitution, the Court, and Social Change | Tomiko Brown-Nagin

Since Brett Kavanaugh’s appointment to the Supreme Court, the potential influence of the court on a range of critically important issues that could come before it in the coming years has been the subject of intense speculation and analysis. In her inaugural lecture series as dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Tomiko Brown-Nagin RI ’17 puts the present moment in context, exploring how the court has—or has not—driven social change and responded to popular movements for social change at crucial points in 20th-century US history.

Featuring:
Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study; Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law, Harvard Law School; and professor of history, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Introduced by:
A'Lelia Bundles, author, journalist, and public speaker

Presented by:
Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
Harvard Alumni Association
Harvard Club of Washington, DC

Recorded by:
PSAV at the Washington Court Hotel, Washington, DC

Writing Black Lives

November 4, 2019
Writing Black Lives

Tomiko Brown-Nagin, Imani Perry, and Robert Reid-Pharr join in conversation to discuss how their work as biographers speaks to key contemporary discussions about black politics, community, identity, and life.

Featuring:

Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study; Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law, Harvard Law School; and professor of history, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Imani Perry, Hughes-Rogers Professor of African American Studies and faculty associate in the program in law and public affairs and the program in gender and sexuality studies, Princeton University 

Robert Reid-Pharr, professor of studies of women, gender, and sexuality and of African and African American studies, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences 

Introduced by Robin Bernstein, Dillon Professor of American History and professor of African and African American studies and of studies of women, gender, and sexuality, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

I Want to Prepare to Learn Something I Don't Know | Gala Porras-Kim

October 10, 2019
Artist Talk by Gala Porras-Kim

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Gala Porras-Kim RI '20 shares some of her work, which considers how a lack of information in the fields of linguistics, history, and conservation allow for other forms of understanding.

Examining the Opioid Epidemic’s Impact on Professional Work | Liz Chiarello

October 10, 2019
Examining the Opioid Epidemic’s Impact on Professional Work by Liz Chiarello

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Liz Chiarello RI '20 uses the opioid and pain crisis as a case for understanding how health care providers make decisions in prescribing and dispensing certain drugs and what the impact is on patient care.

A First Look at the Renovated Schlesinger Library

October 7, 2019
A First Look at the Renovated Schlesinger Library

A week before it reopened to the public, Jane Kamensky offered a tour of the renovated Schlesinger Library. The library is now home to the Lia and William Poorvu Gallery and to an updated seminar space where students can access digitized materials from the archive.

FEATURING
Tomiko Brown-Nagin
Dean, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study; Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law, Harvard Law School; and Professor of History, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Jane Kamensky
Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Foundation Director, Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, and Jonathan Trumbull Professor of American History, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Gravitational Waves, Light, and the Origin of the Heavy Elements | Edo Berger

October 7, 2019
Gravitational Waves, Light, and the Origin of the Heavy Elements by Edo Berger

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Edo Berger RI '20 shares the discovery of gold and other rare heavy elements being forged in a cataclysmic collision between neutron stars, which, through the emission of gravitational waves—a brand new way of sensing the universe—has recently been seen for the very first time.

Thinking Like a Magician | Joshua Jay

October 4, 2019
Thinking Like a Magician by Joshua Jay

In this performance-based lecture, the globe-trotting magician Joshua Jay pulls back the curtain on the way magicians think.

He explores how magicians create seemingly impossible feats and how to apply these same strategies to our lives and work. His demonstration and lecture explore how the techniques that undergird his effects—the guiding of attention, the framing of perception, and the staging of surprise—can give us fine-grained, practical insight into our own creative pursuits. And along the way, Jay mystifies us with some of his signature sleight-of-hand illusions.

0:01 Introduction by dean of the Radcliffe Institute, Tomiko Brown-Nagin
5:57 Reverse Logic
11:50 Misdirection (Hands)
16:47 Ring Revelation
18:43 Thinking Like a Magician
36:12 World Record Routine
41:41 Audience Q&A

This is a 2019–2020 Kim and Judy Davis Dean's Lecture in the Humanities.

Allegories on “Race,” Racism, and Antiracism | Camara Phyllis Jones

October 4, 2019
Allegories on “Race,” Racism, and Antiracism by Camara Phyllis Jones

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Camara Phyllis Jones RI ’20 shares some of the tools she has developed that will equip both children and adults to name racism, ask “How is racism operating here?” and organize and strategize to act.

Originality and Invention | Vision & Justice

June 24, 2019

In this segment of “Vision & Justice,” Carrie Mae Weems and David Adjaye join Sarah Lewis to discuss the process of creating space and institutions and what it means to be an artist who challenges traditional narratives. The two-day creative convening considered the role of the arts in understanding the nexus of art, race, and justice.

FEATURING
Carrie Mae Weems, artist

David Adjaye, architect and principal, Adjaye Associates

Sarah Lewis, assistant professor of history of art and architecture and African and African-American studies, Harvard University

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