Voting Matters | On Account of Race (1965)

October 21, 2020
Voting Matters | On Account of Race (1965)

The passage of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) in 1965 marked one culmination of a long civil rights movement that began in the wake of the American Civil War and gathered steam in the early 20th century, long before the Montgomery bus boycotts and the emergent leadership of Martin Luther King Jr. inaugurated the best-known phase of the movement. Designed to restore the intention of the 15th Amendment, the VRA invalidated poll taxes, literacy tests, and other prerequisites and practices that had been used to disfranchise African American women and men in the states of the former Confederacy. The same year, the Hart-Celler Act, otherwise known as the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), ended the racially discriminatory "national origins formula" that had governed United States immigration policy since the 1920s. Significant milestones in struggles for equal citizenship under the law, the VRA and INA also seeded further controversies over race, gender, and national belonging.

This roundtable conversation, featuring scholars who have pioneered innovative approaches to the past, present, and future of political empowerment, looks at the relationships among the Reconstruction Amendments, the 19th Amendment, the VRA, and the INA.

WELCOME
Jane Kamensky, Jonathan Trumbull Professor of American History in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and Pforzheimer Foundation Director of the Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University

FRAMING NOTE
Liette Gidlow RI '20 (3:15), associate professor of history, Wayne State University

SPEAKERS
Natalia Molina (15:26), professor of American studies and ethnicity, University of Southern California

Myrna Pérez (17:39), director, Voting Rights & Elections Program, Brennan Center for Justice

Nicholas Stephanopoulos (13:00), professor of law, Harvard Law School

Moderated by Tomiko Brown-Nagin RI '17 (9:05), dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard Law School, professor of history in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and chair of the Presidential Committee on Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery, Harvard University

The Enduring Legacy of Slavery and Racism in the North

October 16, 2020
Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery. The Enduring Legacy of Slavery and Racism in the North

Although Massachusetts formally abolished slavery in 1783, the visible and invisible presence of slavery continued in the Commonwealth and throughout New England well into the 19th century. Harvard professor Louis Agassiz's theory about human origins is but one example of the continued presence and institutionalization of racism in the North. Taking as a starting point the new book To Make Their Own Way in the World: The Enduring Legacy of the Zealy Daguerreotypes, this panel of experts examines the role and impact of slavery in the North and discuss the influence of Agassiz and how Black abolitionists responded to scientific racism.

PANELISTS:
Kyera Singleton (5:02), PhD candidate in American culture, University of Michigan, and executive director, Royall House and Slave Quarters

Manisha Sinha (19:03), James L. and Shirley A. Draper Chair in American History, University of Connecticut

John Stauffer (10:39), Sumner R. and Marshall S. Kates Professor of English and of African and African American Studies in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

MODERATOR:
Tiya Miles (28:46), Radcliffe Alumnae Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and professor of history in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

This program is presented as part of the presidential initiative on Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery, a University-wide effort housed at the Radcliffe Institute, and is cosponsored by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology and the Harvard Museums of Science and Culture.

This event is part of Worldwide Week at Harvard 2020, which showcases the remarkable breadth of Harvard's global engagement.

Animals | Will Mackin

October 15, 2020
Radcliffe Institute, Fellow's lecture by Will Mackin

A 23-year US Navy veteran, Bronze Medal recipient, and author, Will Mackin discusses how to write a war story using the military's five-paragraph order format. Mackin is currently working on a collection of short stories called "Animals," based on his experiences as a special operations soldier in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Part of the 2020–2021 Fellows' Presentation Series

The Geography of Lethal Force | Rajiv Sethi

October 8, 2020
Radcliffe Institute Fellow's Lecture. The Geography of Lethal Force by Rajiv Sethi

While at the Radcliffe Institute in 2020–2021, Rajiv Sethi is working on a project on the geography of lethal force. The use of deadly force by law enforcement officers in the United States is extremely high by international standards and involves significant racial disparities. Both the scale and the disparities vary sharply across states, cities, and law enforcement agencies. The main goal of the proposed research is to understand why such geographic variations in scale and racial disparities exist and to identify effective policy remedies.

Part of the 2020–2021 Fellows' Presentation Series

Leaving New Orleans: A Personal Urban History | Leslie M. Harris

October 1, 2020
Radcliffe Institute, Leaving New Orleans: A Personal Urban History by Leslie M. Harris

As the Beatrice Shepherd Blane Fellow, Leslie M. Harris is completing "Leaving New Orleans: A Personal Urban History." She uses memoir and family, urban, and environmental histories to explore the multiple meanings of New Orleans in the nation, from its founding through its uncertain future amid climate change.

Part of the 2020–2021 Fellows' Presentation Series

Voting Matters | On Account of Sex (1920)

October 1, 2020
Voting Matters. Gender, Citizenship, and the Long 19th Amendment. On Account of Sex (1920). Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

The passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920 did not "give" women the vote. Rather, it established a negative: that the right to vote could not be abridged on account of sex alone. When the amendment passed, many women were already voting in states that allowed them to do so. Moreover, even after its passage, African Americans in the South remained disfranchised by race; some immigrant women were blocked from voting by national status; and many women in US territories overseas remained disfranchised by the ways the American empire bounded citizenship.

This "big ideas" session brings together diverse participants who each illuminate one facet of women's political history at this key transitional moment. Together, participants emphasize the radical achievement of the amendment, exploring the full implications of what it meant to remove sex as a barrier to voting, which resulted in the largest-ever one-time expansion of the electorate and mobilized a transnational network of suffragists intent on redefining citizenship. Speakers consider how newly enfranchised voters used their rights, including to erect new barriers to citizenship through immigration restriction and literacy tests, and also explore the expansion of mass incarceration and how women targeted by these exclusions demanded justice.

WELCOME
Susan Ware, historian and biographer; honorary women's suffrage centennial historian, Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University

SPEAKERS
Cathleen Cahill (12:28), associate professor of history, Pennsylvania State University

Sarah Haley (21:25), associate professor of gender studies and African American studies and director of the Black Feminism Initiative at the Center for the Study of Women, UCLA

Mae M. Ngai (5:03), Lung Family Professor of Asian American Studies and professor of history, Columbia University

Reva Siegel (39:16), Nicholas deB. Katzenbach Professor of Law, Yale Law School

Christina Hoff Sommers (47:52), resident scholar, American Enterprise Institute

Dawn Langan Teele (55:55), Janice and Julian Bers Assistant Professor in the Social Sciences, University of Pennsylvania

Moderated by Corinne T. Field RI '19, associate professor of women, gender, and sexuality, University of Virginia

Opening Discussion for Accompanied | Marilyn Pappas and Jill Slosburg-Ackerman

September 28, 2020
Accompanied: The Artworks of Marilyn Pappas and Jill Slosburg-Ackerman

Join the artists for a conversation marking the opening of the virtual exhibition Accompanied: The Artworks of Marilyn Pappas and Jill Slosburg-Ackerman.

FEATURING:
Marilyn Pappas, exhibiting artist, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

Jill Slosburg-Ackerman, exhibiting artist, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

Maggie Doherty PhD '15, author of The Equivalents: A Story of Art, Female Friendship, and Liberation in the 1960s (Knopf, 2020)

Jennifer Roberts, Johnson-Kulukundis Family Faculty Director of the Arts, Radcliffe Institute, and Elizabeth Cary Agassiz Professor of the Humanities, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Meg Rotzel, curator of exhibitions, Radcliffe Institute

An audience Q and A follows the discussion.

Voting Matters | Reconstructing the Polity (1870)

September 24, 2020
Voting Matters | Reconstructing the Polity (1870)

The reconstruction of the American polity after the Civil War—in particular, the adoption of the 15th Amendment in 1870—marked a key moment in the long history of the 19th Amendment, women's political mobilization, and the contested boundaries of United States citizenship.

During the campaign for the 15th Amendment, and the campaign of racial terror that accompanied its passage, Black women mobilized to defend themselves and their communities, innovating ideas and strategies that would reshape the women's suffrage movement. As federal troops moved from the South to the West, Native women faced new forms of violence and questions about whether to defend tribal sovereignty or seek rights within the American nation. Chinese American women, meanwhile, confronted efforts to exclude them from citizenship. This panel uses gender as a lens to understand the cross-cutting trends of enfranchisement and disenfranchisement that came together in the wake of the Civil War.

WELCOME
Jane Kamensky, Jonathan Trumbull Professor of American History in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and Pforzheimer Foundation Director of the Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University

SPEAKERS
(12:45) Amanda Cobb-Greetham (Chickasaw), professor of Native American studies and director of the Native Nations Center, University of Oklahoma

(5:45) Brittney Cooper, associate professor of women's, gender, and sexuality studies, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and cofounder, Crunk Feminist Collective

(21:15) Beth Lew-Williams, associate professor of history and Philip and Beulah Rollins Bicentennial Preceptor, Princeton University

Moderated by Manisha Sinha RI '20, James L. and Shirley A. Draper Chair in American History, University of Connecticut

Perfecters of This Democracy: A Conversation with Nikole Hannah-Jones

September 21, 2020
Perfecters of This Democracy: A Conversation with Nikole Hannah-Jones

As part of the presidential initiative on Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery—a University-wide effort housed at the Radcliffe Institute—Nikole Hannah-Jones, the Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter and creator of the New York Times' 1619 Project, engages in conversation with Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, about pressing issues of race, civil rights, injustice, desegregation, and resegregation.

Voting Matters | Origin Stories: Keynote Address (1848)

September 2, 2020
Voting Matters | Origin Stories: Keynote Address (1848)

We begin our series Voting Matters: Gender, Citizenship, and the Long 19th Amendment with a keynote address by the historian Martha S. Jones, who roots the generations-long movement for women's suffrage in the activism of African American women from the 1830s. Jones explores the tangled intersections of gender and race in the battle for the ballot while considering the evolution of birthright citizenship, more broadly, as itself a gendered origins story about constituting the American people.

WELCOME
Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard Law School, professor of history in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and
chair of the Presidential Committee on Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery, Harvard University

FRAMING REMARKS (3:06)
Jane Kamensky, Jonathan Trumbull Professor of American History in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and Pforzheimer Foundation Director of the Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University

KEYNOTE (9:13)
Martha S. Jones, Society of Black Alumni Presidential Professor and professor of history, Johns Hopkins University

DISCUSSION and Q&A (35:40)
Moderated by Lisa Tetrault, associate professor of history, Carnegie Mellon University

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