Kerry A. Emanuel | Predicting and Adapting to Increased Hurricane Risk

November 15, 2016
Kerry A. Emanuel, Predicting and Adapting to Increased Hurricane Risk

Kerry A. Emanuel shares some of the latest research on tropical cyclones (a.k.a. hurricanes) and explains why their destructiveness is expected to increase. He also explores ways of dealing with the increasing risk of these fascinating yet destructive storms, which are a leading cause of mortality and damage among all natural hazards. 

Introduction by John Huth, faculty codirector of the science program at the Radcliffe Institute and the Donner Professor of Science in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

Families in Flight: Today’s International Refugee Crisis

November 9, 2016
Families in Flight, Today’s International Refugee Crisis

The Radcliffe Institute hosts a panel discussion to explore topics of pressing global concern: refugees, forced migration, and internally displaced people.

Introduction by Lizabeth Cohen, dean, Radcliffe Institute, and Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies, Department of History, Harvard University

Moderated by Jacqueline Bhabha, professor of the practice of health and human rights, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and director of research, FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, Harvard University

Noel Calhoun, senior policy officer, Office of the Special Adviser for the Summit on Addressing Large Numbers of Refugees and Migrants, United Nations

Susan M. Akram, clinical professor of law, Boston University Law School

Rania Matar, independent photographer

Abdulkarim Ekzayez, health program manager, Save the Children International Syria Response

“Families in Flight: Today’s International Refugee Crisis” is the 2016–2017 Rama S. Mehta Program. The annual Rama S. Mehta event at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study was established by Catherine Atwater Galbraith, John Kenneth Galbraith, and the Mehta family in memory of Rama S. Mehta. Each event includes a distinguished woman in public affairs, the sciences, or the arts who has a deep understanding of the problems of women in developing countries.

Next in Science | Astronomy and Astrophysics | Part 1

November 9, 2016
Next in Science, Astronomy and Astrophysics, Part 1

In 2015–2016, the Next in Science series focused on frontiers in astronomy and astrophysics. Scholars discussed new interdisciplinary research on what the structure of the universe tells us about particle interactions, gravitational waves from circling black holes, magnetic fields in intergalactic space, and the possibility of life on exoplanets.

“Deciphering the Early Universe: Connecting Theory with Observations”
Cora Dvorkin, Shutzer Assistant Professor, Radcliffe Institute, and assistant professor of physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

“Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Gravitational Waves*
*But Were Afraid to Ask”
Salvatore Vitale, research scientist, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Introductions by John Huth, faculty codirector of the science program, Radcliffe Institute, and Donner Professor of Science, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

The Next in Science series provides an opportunity for early-career scientists whose innovative, cross-disciplinary research is thematically linked to introduce their work to one another, to fellow scientists, and to nonspecialists from Harvard and the greater Boston area.

Next in Science | Astronomy and Astrophysics | Part 2

November 9, 2016
Next in Science, Astronomy and Astrophysics, Part 2

In 2015–2016, the Next in Science series focused on frontiers in astronomy and astrophysics. Scholars discussed new interdisciplinary research on what the structure of the universe tells us about particle interactions, gravitational waves from circling black holes, magnetic fields in intergalactic space, and the possibility of life on exoplanets.

“Galaxies as Star-Forming Engines: Simulating the Turbulent Birth of Stars” 
Blakesley Burkhart, Einstein Postdoctoral Fellow, Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

“How to Detect Life on Another Planet”
Sarah Rugheimer, Simons Origins of Life Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of St. Andrews (Scotland)

Introductions by John Huth, faculty codirector of the science program, Radcliffe Institute, and Donner Professor of Science, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

The Next in Science series provides an opportunity for early-career scientists whose innovative, cross-disciplinary research is thematically linked to introduce their work to one another, to fellow scientists, and to nonspecialists from Harvard and the greater Boston area.

Righting the Record: Conservatism and the Archives

November 9, 2016

A Schlesinger Library Event

Over the past half-century, grassroots activists and organizations both left and right have focused on women’s roles, family values, homosexuality, and reproductive policy, transforming modern American life. Yet the collections of major public repositories, especially those housed at universities, tend to document only one side of this complicated history: the left side. The Schlesinger Library at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study hosted a conversation among scholars, intellectuals, and activists to explore the consequences of the current situation and examine possible solutions. “Righting the Record” is part of the library’s multifaceted approach to enhancing the diversity of the documentary record, to ensure that students, researchers, and scholars can write more complete and balanced histories of our times. 


Introduced by Jane Kamensky, Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Foundation Director of the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America and Professor of History, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences


Moderated by Ross Douthat, op-ed columnist, New York Times

PANELISTS:
Donald Critchlow, professor of history and director of the Center for Political Thought and Leadership, Arizona State University

Jennifer A. Marshall, vice president, Heritage Foundation

Michelle Nickerson, associate professor of history, Loyola University Chicago

Charmaine Yoest, senior fellow, American Values


Invest In Ideas

November 4, 2016
Invest in Ideas

Invest in Ideas explores how the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University generates and shares ideas across the disciplines—through the Fellowship Program, the Schlesinger Library, and Academic Ventures.

Radcliffe Stories

November 4, 2016
Radcliffe Stories

Every day, fellows, faculty, students, and researchers explore new ideas at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. Radcliffe Stories presents examples of their work from across the arts, humanities, sciences, and social sciences.

Carol J. Oja | Marian Anderson

October 20, 2016
Carol J. Oja, Marian Anderson

As part of the 2016–2017 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Carol J. Oja ’17 presents “Marian Anderson and the Desegregation of the American Concert Stage.” Hailed as one of the greatest singers of the 20th century, Marian Anderson used her talent and celebrity to advance civil rights. Her 1939 concert at the Lincoln Memorial defied a ban excluding African American performers from Constitution Hall in Washington, DC, and her 1955 debut at the Metropolitan Opera ended the Met’s exclusion of African American singers in starring roles. In this lecture—which includes audio and video of Anderson in performance—Oja repositions those landmarks as part of the little-discussed history of institutional segregation in the classical music business.

(10:06) Carol J. Oja, the William Powell Mason Professor of Music at Harvard and the 2016–2017 Frieda L. Miller Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute

Introduction by Lizabeth Cohen, dean of the Radcliffe Institute and Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies in the Department of History, Harvard University

This lecture was part of HUBweek 2016.

Alyssa Goodman | The Prediction Project

October 19, 2016
Alyssa Goodman, The Prediction Project

As part of the 2016–2017 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Alyssa A. Goodman ’17 takes us through the creation of the most modular HarvardX online course yet created, called PredictionX. People have been asking questions about the future both on a global scale and a personal one since the beginning of recorded history. Goodman explores this history of how humanity has predicted its own future, from ancient Mesopotamians reading signs in sheep entrails to modern computer simulations of climate change.

Alyssa A. Goodman is the 2016–2017 Edward, Frances, and Shirley B. Daniels Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and the Robert Wheeler Willson Professor of Applied Astronomy at Harvard University.

Tania Bruguera | The Role of Ethics in Political Art

October 3, 2016
Tania Bruguera, The Role of Ethics in Political Art

As part of the 2016–2017 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Tania Bruguera RI ’17 asks, “What are the uses of art?” Out of all the possible answers to that question, Bruguera has found art particularly useful in changing political discussions in Cuba—and beyond—with its integration into everyday life.

Bruguera is the 2016–2017 Elizabeth S. and Richard M. Cashin Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University.

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