Health, Inequity, and COVID-19

May 1, 2020
Virtual Radcliffe, Health, Inequity, and COVID-19

International experience in recent months has powerfully illustrated that the COVID-19 virus has particularly harmful and disproportionate effects on already vulnerable populations. Mary T. Bassett and Khalil Gibran Muhammad discuss inequity and public health in the time of COVID-19, exploring how the virus encounters existing inequalities, replicates these inequalities, and, in many cases, amplifies them.

PARTICIPANTS:
Mary T. Bassett '74, director of the François-Xavier Bagnoud (FXB) Center for Health and Human Rights and FXB Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Khalil Gibran Muhammad RI '20, Suzanne Young Murray Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and professor of history, race, and public policy at Harvard Kennedy School, Harvard University

Ensuring Health Equity for Persons with Disabilities

May 1, 2020
Virtual Radcliffe, Ensuring Health Equity for Persons with Disabilities

As COVID-19 threatens to push hospital resources beyond capacity, a raft of states, hospitals, and advocacy organizations have formulated protocols to address potential discrimination against persons with disabilities. Two highly influential statements by the Arc and the University of Pittsburgh are setting new standards for the ethical treatment of persons with disabilities. This Radcliffe webinar places these triaging policies within the context of the history of disability civil rights, culture, and bioethics and considers what is necessary to achieve an equitable health outcome for persons with disabilities during this time of crisis.

SPEAKERS:
Rabia Belt, associate professor, Stanford Law School

Rosemarie Garland-Thomson RI '12, professor of English and bioethics in the Department of English and codirector of the Emory Disability Studies Initiative, Emory University

Devan Stahl, assistant professor of religion, Baylor University

Joseph A. Stramondo, assistant professor, Department of Philosophy, San Diego State University

Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein | Come Together

April 9, 2020
Come Together by Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein

Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein, a former United Nations high commissioner for human rights, implores fellow advocates to go beyond their immediate community and support human rights on behalf of everyone.

Taken from his talk "The New Geopolitical Order," a 2019–2020 Kim and Judy Davis Dean's Lecture in the Social Sciences at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University.

Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein | Bullies

April 9, 2020
Bullies by Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein

Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein, a former United Nations high commissioner for human rights, asks what you're willing to do as an individual when bearing witness to fellow human beings being victimized by the bullies.

Taken from his talk "The New Geopolitical Order," a 2019–2020 Kim and Judy Davis Dean's Lecture in the Social Sciences at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University.

Music, Memes, and Digital Antiphony | Braxton D. Shelley

March 23, 2020
Music, Memes, and Digital Antiphony by Braxton D. Shelley

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Braxton D. Shelley RI '20 muses on how today's viral object will be tomorrow's afterthought—yet, he says, "the artifacts left behind reveal a pattern, a cultural logic that is hyper-significant, preoccupied with the formal engines of human sociality."

Ayodele Casel: Diary of a Tap Dancer

March 16, 2020
Diary of a Tap Dancer by Ayodele Casel

Hailed by the legendary hoofer Gregory Hines as "one of the top young tap dancers in the world" and by the New York Times as "a tap dancer of unquestionable radiance," Ayodele Casel is an internationally sought-after artist and a powerful voice for the art form.

In residence at Radcliffe as the 2019–2020 Frances B. Cashin Fellow, Casel is working on Diary of a Tap Dancer, a theatrical work positioning tap dance as its driving narrative force. This project aims to create a richer and more accurate picture of the art form by centering the voices of its too-often unnamed women practitioners within a broader historical context.

INTRODUCTION
Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study; Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law, Harvard Law School; and professor of history, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

DIARY OF A TAP DANCER (5:10)
Featuring Ayodele Casel, Andre Imanishi, and Andrea (Dre) Torres

DISCUSSION (54:01)
Jeneé Osterheldt, culture writer, Boston Globe

AUDIENCE Q&A (1:13:54)

Bodies, Identities, and Power on the Podium | Daniel M. Callahan

March 12, 2020
Bodies, Identities, and Power on the Podium by Daniel M. Callahan

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Daniel M. Callahan RI '20 shares the progress on his forthcoming second book, "Conducting Oneself," which examines how the bodies, identities, and repertoire of orchestra conductors produce, legitimate, and limit their movements on the podium and off, from conservatories to coveted positions.

Esra Akcan and Sawako Kaijima

March 5, 2020
Esra Akcan and Sawako Kaijima

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Esra Akcan RI '20 and Sawako Kaijima RI '20 collaborate with two research agendas, both showing the relevance of architectural studies for responding to today's global challenges.

(00:01) Esra Akcan, "Right to Heal: Architecture in Post-Conflict and Post-Disaster Societies"
(31:42) Sawako Kaijima, "Representation and Materialization of Interdisciplinary Matter"

Humanizing Drug Discovery | David Altshuler

March 5, 2020
Humanizing Drug Discovery by David Altshuler

In the past 30 years, genetics and genomics have exponentially expanded our understanding of human biology and disease. That understanding has the greatest potential benefit for society when it catalyzes the discovery and development of new medicines with the potential to transform the lives of patients in need.

David Altshuler discusses two recent examples of the combination of genetic insights into human biology and the invention of new treatment modalities. Specifically, he focuses on protein-folding correction for cystic fibrosis and investigative CRISPR-based gene-editing approaches for sickle cell disease and beta thalassemia.

History Reconsidered: Poetry Reading with Clint Smith

February 27, 2020
History Reconsidered: Poetry Reading with Clint Smith

Part conversation, part poetry reading, Clint Smith weaves it all together with history—especially the idea that the history we tell ourselves was a long time ago wasn't actually all that long ago.

Introduction by Amanda Gorman, a Harvard College senior studying sociology and the inaugural National Youth Poet Laureate of the United States.

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