. . . first in thought, then in action. | Anthony Romero

February 26, 2020
. . . first in thought, then in action. by Anthony Romero

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Anthony Romero RI '20 shares his work on a multimedia research and visual art project that includes a collection of related but discrete works that attempt to articulate how indigenous populations, under European colonial rule in Australia, South Asia, and the United States, were controlled through the criminalization and legislation of native sound and music practices. Taken together, these histories reveal how carceral and criminalization strategies sowed the seeds for the ongoing over-policing of black and brown communities.

Fixed: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement | Panel Discussion

February 25, 2020
Fixed: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement panel discussion

Panelists discuss the award-winning documentary "Fixed: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement," exploring the social impact of human biotechnologies and carefully considering the ethics of gene editing and disability.

Featuring:
Lydia X. Z. Brown, Georgetown Law
Joseph A. Stramondo, San Diego State University
Michael Ashley Stein, Harvard Law School

New Poems | Joan Naviyuk Kane

February 18, 2020
New Poems by Joan Naviyuk Kane

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Joan Naviyuk Kane RI '20 shares details of her Alaskan Inupiaq family history before transitioning into a poetry reading.

Mzansi's Other Voices | Bongani Ndodana-Breen

February 12, 2020
Mzansi's Other Voices by Bongani Ndodana-Breen

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Bongani Ndodana-Breen RI '20 challenges entrenched notions about the value of indigenous African culture in the discourse on South African classical music and its historic lack of representation of black composers.

Contained in this presentation is a musical recording of Fela Sowande's "African Suite for Strings" and a video recording of a ritual dance by Mozambique's Nyanga Nyengwe community.

Classical Improvisation, Composition, and Creative Dissent | Gabriela Montero

February 4, 2020
Classical Improvisation, Composition, and Creative Dissent by Gabriela Montero

The internationally renowned pianist Gabriela Montero discusses her evolution as an improvisational artist and creative dissenter. Her growth as an artist and leader has been greatly informed by the human rights and political crises in her home country of Venezuela. Joining her in conversation is the baritone and music producer Sam McElroy.

This is a 2019–2020 Kim and Judy Davis Dean's Lecture in the Arts.

The Rise of the Milky Way | João Alves

January 7, 2020
The Rise of the Milky Way by João Alves

As part of the 2018–2019 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the astrophysicist João Alves RI '19 explains how an exhibition by the artist Anna Von Mertens helped guide him to the "Radcliffe wave" findings published in Nature in January 2020.

Alves is a professor of stellar astrophysics at the University of Vienna, in Austria. He was the 2018–2019 Edward, Frances, and Shirley B. Daniels Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

Civilizing the Internet of Things | Francine Berman

January 7, 2020
Civilizing the Internet of Things by Francine Berman

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a deeply interconnected ecosystem of billions of devices and systems that are transforming commerce, science, and society. As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Francine Berman RI '20 explores the larger social and environmental ecosystem needed to develop an IoT that maximizes benefits, minimizes risk, and promotes individual protections, the public good, and planetary responsibility.

Berman is the Edward P. Hamilton Distinguished Professor in Computer Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). She is the 2019–2020 Katherine Hampson Bessell Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

The Call of Migratory Things | Nina McConigley

January 7, 2020
The Call of Migratory Things by Nina McConigley

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Nina McConigley RI '20 prepares the listener with some background for her upcoming novel before reading from the work in progress.

McConigley is a fiction writer and an assistant professor at the University of Wyoming. She is the 2019–2020 Walter Jackson Bate Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

Making Pig-to-Human Transplantation a Clinical Reality | Luhan Yang

January 7, 2020
Making Pig-to-Human Transplantation a Clinical Reality by Luhan Yang

Xenotransplantation is a promising strategy for addressing the shortage of organs for human transplantation. Using CRISPR-Cas9, Luhan Yang, the cofounder and CEO of QihanBio, has helped create a genome editing platform that addresses many of the concerns over pig-to-human immunological compatibility and the risk of cross-species transmission of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs). Join Yang as she shares her mission to create a new world in which no patient has to die while waiting for an organ transplant.

This event is part of the Gene Editing Science Lecture Series and the Unknown and Solitary Seas Gallery Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University.

The Lost Book of Moses: The Hunt for the World's Oldest Bible | Chanan Tigay

January 7, 2020
The Lost Book of Moses: The Hunt for the World's Oldest Bible by Chanan Tigay

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Chanan Tigay RI '20 shares some backstory before reading a passage from his first book, The Lost Book of Moses: The Hunt for the World's Oldest Bible (Ecco, 2016), about the oldest Bible in the world, how its outing as a fraud led to a scandalous death, and why archaeologists now believe it was real—if only they could find it.

Tigay is an award-winning journalist and nonfiction writer. He is a 2019–2020 fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University, where he is working on a new book.

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