Adoption of Effective Practices in Schools | Todd Rogers

December 16, 2019
Adoption of Effective Practices in Schools | Todd Rogers

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Todd Rogers RI ’20 illustrates a selection of randomized control trials that are designed to help determine what works and what doesn’t when developing scalable interventions that are intended to increase the adoption of welfare-enhancing innovations and practices. Rogers is a behavioral scientist who is a professor of public policy at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS). He is the 2019–2020 Lillian Gollay Knafel Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

Breaking My Silence: Amplifying Our Voices as “Others” | Neal Hovelmeier

December 16, 2019
Breaking My Silence: Amplifying Our Voices as “Others” | Neal Hovelmeier

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Neal Hovelmeier RI ’20 shares his insights about how people living on the margins of society struggle to use their voices against the forces that seek to silence them. The story of his coming out, a decision that made him a target of public outcry—including death threats—and forced him to resign from his job at a top Zimbabwean school, starts on a sweltering Thursday morning in September 2018. “The city was awash with the pale indigo of the jacaranda trees,” he says. “And there's an old proverb, which says that jacaranda time is madness time.”

Hovelmeier is a Zimbabwe-based writer, educator, and academic who writes fiction under the pseudonym Ian Holding. He is the 2019–2020 Robert G. James Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

The Sex Crimes Paradox | Corey Rayburn Yung

December 16, 2019
The Sex Crimes Paradox | Corey Rayburn Yung

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Corey Rayburn Yung RI ’20 argues that the failure to have healthy dialogues about sex, consent, and sexual violence has created and continues to create the cultural and legal dysfunction we see today.

Yung is the William R. Scott Research Professor at the University of Kansas School of Law. He is the 2019–2020 Lisa Goldberg Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

To Serve Better—Speak, Memory

December 13, 2019
Joan Naviyuk Kane

At the Radcliffe Institute, Alaskan Inupiaq poet and Harvard alum Joan Naviyuk Kane keeps her language and culture alive through her art and her family.

Transcript. Video by Justin Saglio/Harvard Staff


Inspired by one of Harvard Yard’s famous gates, “To Serve Better” is a yearlong Harvard Gazette project exploring the connections between members of the Harvard community and neighborhoods across the United States and its territories.

Explore "To Serve Better" to see more stories from across the country: https://hrvd.me/serve9y

Radical Commitments | Childhood, Case, and Social Contributions

November 27, 2019
Radical Commitments | Childhood, Case, and Social Contributions

Radical Commitments: The Life and Legacy of Angela Davis
MONDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2019

A cross-generational group of leading scholars, activists, musicians, and incarcerated women lead discussions on the rich tradition of activism and social theory in the late 20th century using the life and work of the political activist and pioneering philosopher Angela Davis.

ROUNDTABLE CONVERSATION ABOUT CHILDHOOD, CASE, AND SOCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS
Introduced by Elizabeth Hinton, John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences, Departments of History and of African and African American Studies, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

Featuring:
(
12:55) Fania E. Davis, consultant and founding director emerita, Restorative Justice for Oakland Youth

(
21:01) Margaret Burnham, University Distinguished Professor of Law and director of the Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project, Northeastern University School of Law

(
31:20) Bettina F. Aptheker, distinguished professor emerita and Peggy and Jack Baskin Foundation Presidential Chair in Feminist Studies, UC Santa Cruz

Moderator: Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher Jr. University Professor and director of the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, Harvard University

PANEL DISCUSSION (
40:15)

The Once and Future Heart | Dario Robleto

November 27, 2019
The Once and Future Heart | Dario Robleto

Join us for a conversation moderated by Jennifer L. Roberts between the artist Dario Robleto, whose exhibition Unknown and Solitary Seas: Dreams and Emotions of the 19th Century at the Radcliffe Institute rethinks the deep history of cardiological recording, and Doris A. Taylor, a scientist whose work toward regenerative transplantation is reshaping the metaphorical—as well as the medical—prospects of the human heart.

Featuring:
Dario Robleto Exhibiting Artist and Visiting Scholar, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

Doris A. Taylor Director of Regenerative Medicine Research and Director of the Center for Cell and Organ Biotechnology, Texas Heart Institute

Jennifer L. Roberts Johnson-Kulukundis Family Faculty Director of the Arts, Radcliffe Institute, and Elizabeth Cary Agassiz Professor of the Humanities, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Unknown and Solitary Seas: Dreams and Emotions of the 19th Century is on view from November 4, 2019, through January 18, 2020, in the Johnson-Kulukundis Family Gallery of Byerly Hall at 8 Garden Street, Radcliffe Yard, Monday through Saturday, from noon to 5 p.m.

Crafty Crows | Christian Rutz

November 27, 2019
Crafty Crows, Tropical Islands, and the Mystery of Human Technological Evolution

As part of the 2019–2020 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Christian Rutz RI ’20 reveals that you don't need a very large brain to be a good tool user. In fact, with a brain the size of a walnut and a completely different neurological architecture compared to what primates have, the New Caledonian crow has evolved to make incredibly complex tools.

Rutz is a professor of biology at the University of St Andrews, in Scotland, where he leads a research group studying animal tool behavior. He is the 2019–2020 Grass Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

Radical Commitments | Session 3: Abolition

November 26, 2019
Radical Commitments | Session 3: Abolition

Radical Commitments: The Life and Legacy of Angela Davis
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2019

A cross-generational group of leading scholars, activists, musicians, and incarcerated women lead discussions on the rich tradition of activism and social theory in the late 20th century using the life and work of the political activist and pioneering philosopher Angela Davis.

SESSION 3: "ABOLITION"
(
6:24) Kathy Boudin, codirector and cofounder, Center for Justice at Columbia University

(
20:28) Ruth Wilson Gilmore, professor of earth and environmental sciences and director of the Center for Place, Culture and Politics, the Graduate Center, City University of New York

(
36:31) Beth E. Richie, professor and department head of criminology, law, and justice and professor of African American studies and gender and women’s studies, University of Illinois at Chicago Moderator: Tommie Shelby, Caldwell Titcomb Professor of African and African American Studies and of Philosophy, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

PANEL DISCUSSION (
53:37)
AUDIENCE Q&A (
1:13:29)

Radical Commitments | Keynote by Angela Davis

November 26, 2019
Radical Commitments | Keynote by Angela Davis

Radical Commitments: The Life and Legacy of Angela Davis
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2019

A cross-generational group of leading scholars, activists, musicians, and incarcerated women lead discussions on the rich tradition of activism and social theory in the late 20th century using the life and work of the political activist and pioneering philosopher Angela Davis.

KEYNOTE CONVERSATION (
28:31)

Angela Davis, distinguished professor emerita, UC Santa Cruz Neferti X. M. Tadiar, professor and chair of women’s, gender & sexuality studies, Barnard College Introduction by Kaia Stern, Elsa Hardy, and Abbie Cohen, reading from the work of The Pathways Collective, a group of incarcerated women studying Angela Davis’s life and writings

(
8:18) Kaia Stern, practitioner-in-residence at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, cofounder and director of the Prison Studies Project, and visiting faculty member and lead of the Transformative Justice Program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, Harvard University

(
2:27) Elsa Hardy, doctoral student in the Department of African and African American Studies, Harvard University

(
3:21) Abbie Cohen, community partnership lead at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University

MUSICAL PERFORMANCE (
22:04)
Esperanza Spalding, professor of the practice of music, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

Terri Lyne Carrington, founder and artistic director, Berklee Institute of Jazz and Gender Justice

Imani Uzuri, vocalist and composer; 2019–2020 fellow, Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, Harvard University

STUDENT Q&A (
1:21:35)

Making the Cut | Session 2: Cardiovascular Disease and Sickle Cell Anemia

November 26, 2019
Making the Cut | Session 2: Cardiovascular Disease and Sickle Cell Anemia

The 2019 Radcliffe Institute science symposium is on gene editing, a technology that enables scientists to change an organism’s DNA. Leading international scientists, clinicians, and ethicists gather to explore case studies of particular gene therapies and consider the legal and bioethical implications of this research.

SESSION 2: CASE STUDIES: HEART DISEASE; SICKLE CELL ANEMIA
Introduction by moderator Omar Abudayyeh, fellow, McGovern Institute for Brain Research, MIT

(
7:39) Vence L. Bonham Jr., senior advisor to the director on genomics and health disparities, National Human Genome Research Institute

(
30:07) Kiran Musunuru, associate professor of medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

PANEL DISCUSSION (
54:26)
AUDIENCE Q&A (
1:08:51)

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