Universities and Slavery | 4 of 5 | Slavery and Harvard

March 15, 2017
Universities and Slavery: Bound by History

SLAVERY AND HARVARD

Sven Beckert (3:05), Laird Bell Professor of History, Harvard University

Alexandra Rahman ’12 (15:47), Student Contributor, Harvard and Slavery: Seeking a Forgotten History

Daniel R. Coquillette (25:19), J. Donald Monan, S.J. University Professor, Boston College Law School

Julian Bonder (38:54), Principal, Wodiczko + Bonder and Julian Bonder + Associates; Professor of Architecture, Roger Williams University

Moderator: Annette Gordon-Reed RI '16, Charles Warren Professor of American Legal History, Harvard Law School, and Professor of History, Harvard University

PANEL DISCUSSION (53:20)

Universities and Slavery | 3 of 5 | Poetry Reading

March 15, 2017
Universities and Slavery: Bound by History

POETRY READING

Natasha Trethewey RI '01 (4:15), Former United States Poet Laureate; Robert W. Woodruff Professor of English and Creative Writing, Emory University

Introduced by: Vincent Brown RI '06, Charles Warren Professor of American History and Professor of African and African American Studies, Harvard University

Universities and Slavery | 2 of 5 | Slavery and Universities Nationally

March 15, 2017
Universities and Slavery: Bound by History

SLAVERY AND UNIVERSITIES NATIONALLY

James T. Campbell (4:12), Edgar E. Robinson Professor in United States History, Stanford University

Adam Rothman (13:43), Professor of History, Georgetown University

Craig Steven Wilder (23:47), Barton L. Weller Professor of History, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Moderator: Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, Victor S. Thomas Professor of History and of African and African American Studies, Harvard University

PANEL DISCUSSION (32:50)

Universities and Slavery | 1 of 5 | Keynote

March 15, 2017
Universities and Slavery: Bound by History

WELCOME

Lizabeth Cohen, Dean, Radcliffe Institute, and Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies, Harvard University

OPENING REMARKS (12:07)

Drew Gilpin Faust, President and Lincoln Professor of History, Harvard University

KEYNOTE (15:51)

Ta-Nehisi Coates, Journalist; National Correspondent, the Atlantic: Author, Between the World and Me (Spiegel & Grau, 2015) and The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood (Spiegel & Grau, 2008)

Conversation between Ta-Nehisi Coates and Drew Gilpin Faust (34:37)

Universities and Slavery | 5 of 5 | Slavery and Universities Globally

March 15, 2017
Universities and Slavery: Bound by History

SLAVERY AND UNIVERSITIES GLOBALLY

Max Price (5:06), Vice-Chancellor, University of Cape Town

Christiane Taubira (17:31), Former Minister of Justice (France)

Hilary Beckles (36:55), Vice-Chancellor, University of the West Indies

Moderator: Alejandro de la Fuente (1:09), Robert Woods Bliss Professor of Latin American History and Economics; Professor of African and African American Studies and of History; Director, Afro-Latin American Research Institute, Harvard University

PANEL DISCUSSION (58:17)

CONCLUDING REMARKS (1:27:09)
Daniel Carpenter, Faculty Director of the Social Sciences Program, Radcliffe Institute; Allie S. Freed Professor of Government, Harvard University

Karin B. Michels | Is Epigenetics Inherited?

March 10, 2017
Karin B. Michels, Is Epigenetics Inherited?

As part of the 2016–2017 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Karin B. Michels ’17 explains that epigenetics changes as a result of the environment we live in and how we choose to live in it. Influences such as smoking, exercise, taking drugs, social interactions, air pollution, viruses, or the microbiome can all affect your epigenome. But what if your grandmother smoked? The question remains: Is epigenetics heritable?

Jennifer Finney Boylan | Gender, Politics, and Imagination

March 10, 2017
Jennifer Finney Boylan, Gender, Politics, & Imagination

"Gender, Politics, and Imagination: An Afternoon with Jennifer Finney Boylan," A Schlesinger Library Event

Jennifer Finney Boylan (16:27), the inaugural Anna Quindlen Writer in Residence at Barnard College of Columbia University, speaks about privilege, politics, and poetics. The author of 15 books—including She's Not There: A Life in Two Genders (Broadway Books, 2003), the first best-selling work by a transgender American—Boylan is also the chair of the board of GLAAD and a New York Times op-ed page contributing writer.

Introductions by Lizabeth Cohen, dean, Radcliffe Institute, and Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies, History Department, Harvard University, and

Jane Kamensky (5:52), Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Foundation Director, Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, and professor of history, History Department, Harvard University

(54:17) After her remarks, Boylan engages the Harvard College students Schuyler Bailar ’19 and Jessica Fournier ’17 in a wide-ranging conversation about gender and sexuality issues on and beyond college campuses.

Kaleomanuiwa Wong | Polynesian Voyaging Society

March 1, 2017
Kaleomanuiwa Wong, Polynesian Voyaging Society

In 1975, when the Hōkūleʻa was built and launched from the shores of Hawaii and set course for the nearest landfall 2,500 miles away with no GPS, no compass, and no modern day navigational assistance, both Hawaiian and non-Hawaiian spectators were convinced the project would be a failure. But thanks to traditional navigation techniques, which use the stars along with ocean swells, the canoe was able to successfully traverse through the middle of the ocean from Hawaii to Tahiti.

Forty-one years later, Hōkūleʻa is in the midst of a three-year, worldwide voyage established to create global relationships and explore how to care for our oceans. Sailing in the wake of its ancestors, the Polynesian Voyaging Society carries a message of mālama honua, caring for Island Earth and each other. Using their canoes as a platform, its members hope to bridge cultural tradition and modern technology, timeless values and new visions—and to inspire the next generation of leaders to build sustainable solutions for Island Earth’s future.

Jeff Gelles | Seeing the Birth of an RNA Molecule

February 27, 2017
Jeff Gelles, Seeing the Birth of an RNA Molecule

As part of the 2016–2017 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Jeff Gelles ’17 examines the ways that genetic information is processed in living cells. It turns out that the process is done by “machines” so tiny that they are made up of individual molecules. The biological world is a fascinating and beautiful place.

Gelles is the 2016–2017 Helen Putnam Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute.

Lamia Joreige | Under-Writing Beirut—Ouzaï

February 27, 2017
Lamia Joreige, Under-Writing Beirut—Ouzaï

As part of the 2016–2017 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Lamia Joreige ’17 assembles elements from such diverse fields as film, history, and urban and political studies to examine the relationship between the state and the diverse communities existing within Lebanon.

Joreige is the 2016–2017 Rita E. Hauser Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute.

Pages