Jeff Gelles | Seeing the Birth of an RNA Molecule

February 27, 2017
Jeff Gelles, Seeing the Birth of an RNA Molecule

As part of the 2016–2017 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Jeff Gelles ’17 examines the ways that genetic information is processed in living cells. It turns out that the process is done by “machines” so tiny that they are made up of individual molecules. The biological world is a fascinating and beautiful place.

Gelles is the 2016–2017 Helen Putnam Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute.

Lamia Joreige | Under-Writing Beirut—Ouzaï

February 27, 2017
Lamia Joreige, Under-Writing Beirut—Ouzaï

As part of the 2016–2017 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Lamia Joreige ’17 assembles elements from such diverse fields as film, history, and urban and political studies to examine the relationship between the state and the diverse communities existing within Lebanon.

Joreige is the 2016–2017 Rita E. Hauser Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute.

Stephanie LeMenager | What is Cli-Fi?

January 25, 2017
Stephanie LeMenager, What is Cli-Fi?

The 2016–2017 Radcliffe Institute fellow Stephanie LeMenager explains the broad and burgeoning genre of climate fiction and how artists, filmmakers, and authors alike are using it to tell the story of climate change.

Stephanie LeMenager | Climate Citizenship and the Humanities

January 25, 2017
Stephanie LeMenager, Climate Citizenship and the Humanities

The 2016–2017 Radcliffe Institute fellow Stephanie LeMenager is interested in what it means to be human in the era of climate change. Understanding this challenging and often controversial topic is why the humanities are more important now than ever.

Jennifer Scheper Hughes | Contagion and the Sacred in Mexico

December 21, 2016
Jennifer Scheper Hughes, Contagion and the Sacred in Mexico

As part of the 2016–2017 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Jennifer Scheper Hughes ’17 presents “Contagion and the Sacred in Mexico: Epidemic Disease, Indigenous Death, and the Birth of New World Christianity,” in which she explores the religious dimensions of the collapse of the indigenous population in Mexico in the 16th century. 

Hughes is the 2016–2017 Maury Green Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute.

Gidon Eshel | Rethinking the American Diet

December 21, 2016
Gidon Eshel, Rethinking the American Diet

As part of the 2016–2017 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Gidon Eshel ’17 tells us that every dietary choice we make has a far greater impact than we might realize—and often in unexpected areas. Eshel, in collaboration with scientists from the Harvard University Center for the Environment and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, has been developing multi-objective metrics of diet, to simultaneously optimize health outcomes and environmental impact.

Jacob S. Hacker | American Amnesia: Forgetting What Made Us Prosper

December 15, 2016
Jacob S. Hacker, American Amnesia: Forgetting What Made Us Prosper

(6:10) Jacob S. Hacker discusses the importance of an effective public sector to America’s health, wealth, and well-being and explores why so many of our economic and political leaders seem to have forgotten this perspective. He explains these concepts in the context of recent political events, the historic 2016 election, and changing ideas about government itself.

Hacker, the Stanley B. Resor Professor of Political Science and the director of the Institute for Social and Policy Studies at Yale University, is the author, with Paul Pierson, of the recently published American Amnesia: How the War on Government Led Us to Forget What Made America Prosper (Simon & Schuster, 2016), an Editors’ Choice of the New York Times Sunday Book Review.

Introduction by Lizabeth Cohen, dean, Radcliffe Institute, and Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies, Department of History, Harvard University

Audience Q&A (43:02)

Protecting People from the Ocean, and the Ocean from People

December 12, 2016
Protecting People from the Ocean, and the Ocean from People

Protecting People from the Ocean and the Ocean from People:
Search and Rescue and Marine Environmental Protection/Response

The Coast Guard, the fifth branch of the US Armed Forces, is a multi-mission maritime agency. This talk reviews how the Coast Guard in Boston and throughout the nation seeks to strike the balance between maritime safety, security, and environmental protection amidst changing climate conditions, all while facilitating the powerful economic engine of maritime commerce.

Featuring
(3:0830:26) Claudia C. Gelzer, Captain, US Coast Guard

(9:37) Lee Titus, Commander, US Coast Guard

Introduction by John Huth, faculty codirector of the science program at the Radcliffe Institute and Donner Professor of Science in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

Q&A (47:44)

Part of the 2016–2017 Oceans Lecture Series

Reveal | Schlesinger Library

December 8, 2016
Reveal, Schlesinger Library

The unique materials in special collections libraries invite novice and experienced researchers alike to build fresh interpretations of the past. In this video, Elisa New, the Powell M. Cabot Professor of American Literature in the Department of English, brings Harvard College first-year students to the Schlesinger Library at the Radcliffe Institute to explore the papers of the pioneering feminist poet and activist Adrienne Rich. The students immerse themselves in Rich’s childhood drawings, early poems, journals, correspondence, annotated manuscripts, and more. It is an experience one student describes as standing at the “epicenter” of the poet and her world—and it is just one example of what Harvard’s special collections libraries can reveal.

Connect | Schlesinger Library

December 8, 2016
Connect, Schlesinger Library

The Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America is a special collections library at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute that offers access to uniquely illuminating documentary resources representing the long span of American history, from the beginnings of the United States to the present day. When students connect directly with the library’s materials—such as letters, diaries, newspapers, manuscripts, and oral histories—they gain hands-on research skills, a deeper understanding of history, and a chance to create new knowledge of our shared past. In this video, Harvard students and faculty members convey the educational value of using archival materials for learning and teaching.

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