Disability and Citizenship | Global Perspectives on Citizenship

November 20, 2018
Disability and Citizenship, Global Perspectives on Citizenship

The Radcliffe Institute is in the second year of a two-year exploration of the broad theme of local, national, and international citizenship through a series of public and private programs, fellowships, special collections, and exhibitions.

As part of that exploration, this conference, "Disability and Citizenship: Global and Local Perspectives," explores the ways in which contemporary notions of disability are linked to concepts of citizenship and belonging. Leaders in advocacy, education, medicine, and politics consider how ideas of community at the local, national, and international levels affect the understanding of and policies related to disability—and how this has manifested itself, in particular, in higher education.

GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES ON CITIZENSHIP
(4:02) Maria Town, director, Mayor's Office for People with Disabilities, City of Houston

(17:51) Ari Ne'eman, chief executive officer, Mysupport.com; cofounder, Autistic Self Advocacy Network

(33:05) Charlotte V. McClain-Nhlapo, global disability advisor, Social, Urban, Rural and Resilience Global Practice, World Bank

Moderator: Cheri A. Blauwet, assistant professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital/Brigham and Women's Hospital

PANEL DISCUSSION (47:48)
AUDIENCE Q&A (57:21)

Political Geometry: The Mathematics of Redistricting | Moon Duchin

November 19, 2018
Political Geometry: The Mathematics of Redistricting by Moon Duchin

As part of the 2018–2019 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Moon Duchin RI '19 asks what the inroads are in understanding redistricting and how math models can help us do to it better.

Duchin is a mathematician at Tufts University, where she is also a senior fellow in the Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life and directs the interdisciplinary program in Science, Technology, and Society. She is the 2018–2019 Evelyn Green Davis Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

Finding Fairness | Cynthia Dwork

November 19, 2018
Finding Fairness by Cynthia Dwork

As part of the 2018–2019 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Cynthia Dwork RI '19 addresses an increasing concern that, as computers and computer algorithms reach ever more deeply into our lives, they should incorporate societal values such as privacy, fairness, and statistical validity.

Dwork is a Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, a Radcliffe Alumnae Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and an affiliated faculty member at Harvard Law School. As a Radcliffe Alumnae Professor, she is also a member of the 2018–2019 and 2017–2018 fellowship classes.

Dragonfly Eyes: What Counts as Art Today? | Xu Bing

November 19, 2018
Dragonfly Eyes: What Counts as Art Today? by Xu Bing

A 2018–2019 Kim and Judy Davis Dean's Lecture in the Arts

The world-renowned artist Xu Bing joins in conversation with the Harvard faculty members Eugene Wang RI '17, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Professor of Asian Art, and Jennifer L. Roberts, Johnson-Kulukundis Family Faculty Director of the Arts at the Radcliffe Institute and Elizabeth Cary Agassiz Professor of the Humanities.

Translations by Szu-Chiao (Joie) Chen

Why Would "We" Help "Them"? | Hernan del Valle

November 14, 2018
Why Would "We" Help "Them"? by Hernan del Valle

As part of the 2018–2019 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Hernan del Valle RI '19 tells the story of how a bunch of doctors ended up rescuing refugees in the Mediterranean Sea, how it's coming to an end, and what's happening in the background politically in Europe and elsewhere.

As head of humanitarian affairs and advocacy for Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), del Valle bared witness to the difficult political challenges that emerged for MSF throughout this operation, not only in its relation with European governments but also engaging with a civil society bitterly divided by debates on migration.

Del Valle has led humanitarian aid operations for the past 15 years. His work has taken him across five continents assisting people affected by armed conflict and forced displacement. He is the 2018–2019 Rita E. Hauser Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

Science Sounds Strange: Ether Waves, Espionage, and the Theremin’s Odyssey

November 9, 2018
Science Sounds Strange: Ether Waves, Espionage, and the Theremin’s Odyssey

The musicologist and composer Dorit Chrysler demonstrates the eerie, strange, and endless range of the theremin, a unique musical instrument created by the physicist-turned-electronic-music-pioneer Léon Theremin as a result of his Soviet-sponsored spy research into electromagnetic waves and proximity sensors.

Featuring additional commentary by John Huth, Donner Professor of Science, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Introduction by Immaculata De Vivo, interim faculty codirector of the science program, Radcliffe Institute; professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School; and professor of epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Theremin Demonstrations:
1. "The Swan" by Camille Saint-Saëns (8:22)
2. "The Day the Earth Stood Still" by Bernhard Herrmann* (27:45)
3. "Rubies and Pearls" by Dorit Chrysler (32:30)

*Piano: Rob Schwimmer

This event is part of The Undiscovered Science Lecture Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University.

A Political Poetry: Reading and Conversation with Solmaz Sharif

November 8, 2018
A Political Poetry: Reading and Conversation with Solmaz Sharif

The award-winning poet and Radcliffe Institute visiting scholar Solmaz Sharif reads selected poems and participates in a discussion with Evie Shockley RI ’19.

The Undiscovered | 2 of 5 | LIFE

November 6, 2018
The Undiscovered, 2 of 5, LIFE

The 2018 Radcliffe Institute science symposium, "The Undiscovered," focuses on how scientists explore realities they cannot anticipate. Speakers from across the disciplines of modern science present personal experiences and discuss how to train scientists, educators, and funders to foster the expertise and open-mindedness needed to reveal undiscovered aspects of the world around us.

LIFE
(3:13) Robinson W. Fulweiler, associate professor in the Departments of Earth & Environment and of Biology and director of the Boston University Marine Program, Boston University

(23:14) Joel Dudley, associate professor of genetics and genomic sciences, associate professor of population health science and policy, associate professor of medicine, and director of the Next Generation Healthcare Institute, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai

Discussant: Immaculata De Vivo, interim faculty codirector of the science program, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study; professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School; and professor of epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

PANEL DISCUSSION (43:26)
AUDIENCE Q&A (52:46)

The Undiscovered | 3 of 5 | EARTH

November 6, 2018
The Undiscovered, 3 of 5, EARTH

The 2018 Radcliffe Institute science symposium, "The Undiscovered," focuses on how scientists explore realities they cannot anticipate. Speakers from across the disciplines of modern science present personal experiences and discuss how to train scientists, educators, and funders to foster the expertise and open-mindedness needed to reveal undiscovered aspects of the world around us.

EARTH
(3:23) Nathan E. Hultman, director of the Center for Global Sustainability and associate professor in the School of Public Policy, University of Maryland

Discussant: Conevery Bolton Valencius, professor of history, Boston College

DISCUSSION (27:38)
AUDIENCE Q&A (32:22)

The Undiscovered | 4 of 5 | SPACE

November 6, 2018
The Undiscovered, 4 of 5, SPACE

The 2018 Radcliffe Institute science symposium, "The Undiscovered," focuses on how scientists explore realities they cannot anticipate. Speakers from across the disciplines of modern science present personal experiences and discuss how to train scientists, educators, and funders to foster the expertise and open-mindedness needed to reveal undiscovered aspects of the world around us.

SPACE
(5:22) Laura Kreidberg, junior fellow, Harvard Society of Fellows, and ITC Fellow, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

(23:30) Lisa Kaltenegger, associate professor in astronomy and director of the Carl Sagan Institute, Cornell University

Discussant: David Charbonneau, professor of astronomy and Harvard College Professor, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

DISCUSSION (47:01)
AUDIENCE Q&A (53:05)

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