The Undiscovered | 4 of 5 | SPACE

November 6, 2018
The Undiscovered, 4 of 5, SPACE

The 2018 Radcliffe Institute science symposium, "The Undiscovered," focuses on how scientists explore realities they cannot anticipate. Speakers from across the disciplines of modern science present personal experiences and discuss how to train scientists, educators, and funders to foster the expertise and open-mindedness needed to reveal undiscovered aspects of the world around us.

SPACE
(5:22) Laura Kreidberg, junior fellow, Harvard Society of Fellows, and ITC Fellow, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

(23:30) Lisa Kaltenegger, associate professor in astronomy and director of the Carl Sagan Institute, Cornell University

Discussant: David Charbonneau, professor of astronomy and Harvard College Professor, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

DISCUSSION (47:01)
AUDIENCE Q&A (53:05)

The Undiscovered | 5 of 5 | Jill Tarter

November 6, 2018
The Undiscovered, 5 of 5, Jill Tarter

The 2018 Radcliffe Institute science symposium, "The Undiscovered," focuses on how scientists explore realities they cannot anticipate. Speakers from across the disciplines of modern science present personal experiences and discuss how to train scientists, educators, and funders to foster the expertise and open-mindedness needed to reveal undiscovered aspects of the world around us.

AFTERNOON KEYNOTE
(2:44) Jill Tarter, chair emeritus for SETI Research, SETI Institute

AUDIENCE Q&A (36:54)

CLOSING REMARKS
(51:40) Alyssa Goodman, faculty codirector of the science program, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and Robert Wheeler Willson Professor of Applied Astronomy, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

READING: "METHOD VS. MUSE"
(59:43) Ceili Magnus, senior, Barnstable High School

(Why) Reporting the Voices of African Women and Girls Matters

October 25, 2018
Why, Reporting the Voices of African Women and Girls Matters

The 2018–2019 Rama S. Mehta Lecture at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
A lecture by Ofeibea Quist-Arcton

An all-purpose Africa reporter, National Public Radio's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton is often to be found—in open-air markets, on the front line, in the boardroom, in educational institutions, in urban and village settings, in creative spaces and sacred places—listening to women and girls talk about the continent, the world, and what matters to them. And to us all.

FEATURING
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, Africa correspondent, NPR

Marco Werman, host, The World, Public Radio International

Introduced by Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean of the Radcliffe Institute, the Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard Law School, and a professor of history in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Audiofuturism | andré m. carrington

October 24, 2018
Audio futurism by andré m. carrington

As part of the 2018–2019 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, andré m. carrington RI '19 investigates the nexus of race and genre and the tradition of science fiction radio drama, showing how speculative fiction and literary adaptation are transatlantic world-making practices that both influence and respond to the modern sensorium.

Tara Oceans: Cells, Embryos, and the Origins of Complexity in Life

October 23, 2018
Tara Oceans: Cells, Embryos, and the Origins of Complexity in Life

Drawing upon a vast database of plankton collected from the world's seas by the research vessel Tara, Eric Karsenti shows how these newly discovered life forms are offering clues about the emergence of complex marine organisms over the past 4 billion years.

This talk coincides with the visit of the research vessel Tara to Boston Harbor and is cosponsored by the Consulate General of France in Boston.

This event is part of The Undiscovered Science Lecture Series.

Dawnland Panel Discussion

October 15, 2018
Dawnland Panel Discussion

This panel discussion followed a screening of the feature-length documentary Dawnland.

For much of the 20th century, child welfare authorities removed Native American children from their tribal homes, devastating parents and denying children their traditions, culture, and identity. Dawnland chronicles the first official truth and reconciliation commission in the United States for Native Americans and explores the possibilities of healing and reconciliation.

This event was cosponsored by the Harvard University Native American Program and the Program on Negotiation at the Harvard Law School.

SPEAKERS:
Esther Anne, codirector, Maine-Wabanaki REACH

Adam Mazo, codirector, Dawnland, and director, Upstander Project

Ronald Niezen, 2018–2019 William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies, Canada Program, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University; Katharine A. Pearson Chair in Civil Society and Public Policy, Faculties of Law and Arts, and professor, Department of Anthropology, McGill University

Moderated by Robert T. Anderson, 2018–2019 Oneida Indian Nation Visiting Professor of Law, Harvard Law School; director of the Native American Law Center and professor, University of Washington School of Law

Introduced by Shelly Lowe, executive director, Harvard University Native American Program

A Conversation with Scott McCloud

October 15, 2018
A Conversation with Scott McCloud

This conversation followed the lecture "Visual Storytelling, Visual Communication" by Scott McCloud, a 2018–2019 Dean's Lecture in the Humanities at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University.

SPEAKERS:
Scott McCloud, cartoonist and comics theorist

Discussant: Shigehisa (Hisa) Kuriyama, faculty director of the humanities program, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and Reischauer Institute Professor of Cultural History, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Grand Old Women and Modern Girls | Corinne T. Field

October 9, 2018
Grand Old Women and Modern Girls by Corinne T. Field

As part of the 2018–2019 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Corinne T. Field RI '19 explores the history of generational and racial conflict in the US women's rights movement from 1870 to 1920.

Field is an associate professor of women, gender, and sexuality at the University of Virginia. Her research explores the intersections of age, gender, and race in US history, focusing in particular on the political dimensions of adulthood in debates over women's rights and racial justice. She is the 2018–2019 Mellon-Schlesinger Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

Feminisms Now! | A Schlesinger Library 75th Anniversary Event

October 2, 2018
Feminisms Now!, A Schlesinger Library 75th Anniversary Event

This panel, presented in partnership with VIDA: Women in the Literary Arts, in celebration of Schlesinger Library's 75th anniversary and the 10th anniversary of the VIDA count, invited rising artists, thinkers, and organizers to share their visions of gender equality for the 21st century. Panelists reflect on their art and activism in the service of intersecting and sometimes competing feminisms.

INTRODUCED BY
Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study; Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law, Harvard Law School; and professor of history, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Jane Kamensky, Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Foundation Director, Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, Radcliffe Institute; and Jonathan Trumbull Professor of American History, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

FEATURING
Fatimah Asghar (15:43), poet and screenwriter

Dana Bolger (23:18), cofounder, Know Your IX

Melissa Febos (32:23), assistant professor of creative writing, Monmouth University

Kimberly Foster (44:17), cultural critic and founder, For Harriet

Emi Koyama (57:28), activist, writer, and rogue intellectual

Moderated by Robert Reid-Pharr, professor of studies of women, gender, and sexuality, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

PANEL DISCUSSION (01:16:28)

AUDIENCE Q&A (01:31:54)

Feeling the Way to Truth | Christia Mercer

September 25, 2018
Feeling the Way to Truth by Christia Mercer

As part of the 2017–2018 Fellows' Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Christia Mercer RI '19 argues that we need to rethink core assumptions about the development of modern philosophy and that the writings of women played a much more significant role in its development than has been recognized.

Mercer is the Gustave M. Berne Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University, general editor of the Oxford Philosophical Concepts series, and coeditor of Oxford New Histories of Philosophy, a book series devoted to making philosophy more inclusive. She is the 2018–2019 Mildred Londa Weisman Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

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