Fellowship / Fellows

Amanda Cobb-Greetham

  • 2021–2022
  • Humanities
  • Beatrice Shepherd Blane Fellow
  • University of Oklahoma
Portrait of Amanda Cobb-Greetham
Photo courtesy of Amanda Cobb-Greetham

Amanda Cobb-Greetham is a professor in the Department of Native American Studies at the University of Oklahoma.

While at Radcliffe, Cobb-Greetham is working on “Bright, Golden Haze: Oklahoma/Indian Identity in Myth and Memory,” a collection of interrelated essays interrogating Oklahoma/Indian myth and memory. The book places Oklahoma history and mythology at the center of the American story, turning on the perceived fulfillment of manifest destiny and the “conquering” of Native peoples and, specifically, the contestation of such cultural erasure through the production of tribal-specific counternarratives. The collection includes memoir and critical analysis, archival documents and contemporary cultural texts, and a synthesized, interdisciplinary approach throughout to illustrate the impact of myth and memory on tribal sovereignty and Native lived experience.

Cobb-Greetham awards for her scholarship include the American Book Award for Listening to Our Grandmothers’ Stories: The Bloomfield Academy for Chickasaw Females, 1852–1949 (University of Nebraska Press, 2000). She was instrumental in launching the Chickasaw Cultural Center and the Chickasaw Press, the first tribal publishing house of its kind, and she received the 2018 Chickasaw Nation Dynamic Woman of the Year Award. Cobb-Greetham was the editor of American Indian Quarterly for nine years and currently serves on the board of trustees of the National Museum of the American Indian and on the board of governors for Honoring Nations. She contributed to the development of the First Americans Museum and is the founding president of The Auntie Project: Native Women of Service. Cobb-Greetham earned her PhD from the University of Oklahoma.

Our 2021–2022 Fellows

01 / 09

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