Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo
AnthonyRomero
2019–2020
David and Roberta Logie Fellow
School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts University
Visual Arts
no noise disturbed the quiet of the morning

Anthony Romero is a Boston-based artist, writer, and organizer committed to documenting and supporting artists and communities of color. His collaborative practice engages intercultural contact and historical narratives in order to generate reparative counter-images and social transformation. Romero is currently a professor of the practice at Tufts University.

As a Radcliffe fellow, Romero is working on a multimedia research and visual art project that includes a collection of related but discrete works which attempt to articulate how indigenous populations, under European colonial rule in Australia, South Asia, and the United States, were controlled through the criminalization and legislating of native sound and music practices. Taken together, these histories reveal how carceral and criminalizing strategies sowed the seeds for the ongoing over-policing of black and brown communities.

His projects and performances have been recently featured at the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Blue Star Contemporary, the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston, and Mountain Standard Time Performative Art Festival. He coauthored, with Dan S. Wang, The Social Practice That Is Race (Beyond Repair, 2016) and edited the exhibition catalog Organize Your Own: The Politics and Poetics of Self-Determination Movements (Soberscove Press, 2016). He is a cofounder of the Latinx Artist Visibility Award, a national scholarship for Latinx artists produced in collaboration with the artist J. Soto and Ox-Bow School of Art and Artists’ Residency, and a cofounder of the Latinx Artists Retreat, a national gathering of Latinx artists and administrators. Romero earned an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

2019–2020 Radcliffe Institute Fellows

This information is accurate as of the fellowship year indicated for each fellow.
Photo by Tony Rinaldo