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Fellowship / Fellows

Doohwan Ahn

  • 2017–2018
  • Social Sciences
  • Radcliffe-Harvard Yenching Institute Fellow
  • Seoul National University (South Korea)
Headshot of Ahn Doohwan
Photo by Tony Rinaldo

This information is accurate as of the fellowship year indicated for each fellow.

Doohwan Ahn is an assistant professor in the Department of Politics and International Relations at Seoul National University, where he has been teaching international history since 2013. His research interests are in early modern European intellectual history, with a special focus on the birth of the first British Empire. Ahn has published widely on this subject and is currently completing his first book, tentatively titled “Britain before the Empire: Bolingbroke and the Road to the Patriot King, 1688–1751.” His recent publications include “From Hanover to Gibraltar: Cato’s Letters (1720–1723) in International Context,” which appeared in History of European Ideas (2016), and Fénelon in the Enlightenment: Traditions, Adaptations, and Variations (Brill/Rodopi, 2014), coedited with Christoph Schmitt-Maaß and Stefanie Stockhorst.

As a Radcliffe-Harvard Yenching Institute Fellow, Ahn is working on a new book, provisionally titled “Imperial Crossroads: Great Britain and the United States in the Far East, 1853–1945.” Surveying Anglo-American competition in the Far East at the turn of the 19th century, he intends to identify conditions for a peaceful power transition and possible risks in the process. While revisiting the East Asian entry into the international society by reframing it in the context of the Anglo-American contest for empire, Ahn also wants to draw historical lessons for contemporary US-China relations.

Ahn is a founding editorial board member of the journal Global Intellectual History. He obtained a PhD degree in history from the University of Cambridge in 2012.

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