Cindi Katz
CindiKatz
2003–2004
City University of New York
Geography
Retheorizing Childhood

Cindi Katz is a professor of geography in environmental psychology and women’s studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Her work concerns social reproduction and the production of space, place, and nature; children and the environment; and the consequences of global economic restructuring for everyday life. She recently completed two books on these themes: Disintegrating Developments: Global Economic Restructuring and Children’s Everyday Lives, forthcoming from University of Minnesota Press in 2004, and Life’s Work, coedited with Sallie Marston and Katharyne Mitchell, to be published this year by Blackwell.

While at Radcliffe, Katz will be working on a new book project: a critical examination of modern notions of US childhood. Drawing on archival materials and ethnographic research, she will address the shifting ecologies of childhood in the United States through an analysis of the relationship of children to nature, the city, war, and terror and of the way children are understood as workers, consumers, investors, spectacles, and social actors.

Katz received her doctorate from the Graduate School of Geography at Clark University. She held a postdoctoral fellowship in environmental psychology from the National Institute of Mental Health and a research fellowship at the Center for the Critical Analysis of Contemporary Culture at Rutgers University. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the American Association of University Women, and the Aaron Diamond Foundation.

This information is accurate as of the fellowship year indicated for each fellow.