Photo by Tony RinaldoPhoto by Tony Rinaldo
GlendaGilmore
2000–2001
Schlesinger Library
Yale University
History
The Second Civil War: The South, The Nation, and the World, 1915-1955

An assistant professor of history at Yale University, Glenda Gilmore focuses her research on the American South. Gilmore’s research ranges from progressivism to the Jim Crow laws and the politics of race and gender in the American South.

She plans to write a book manuscript, “The Second Civil War: The South, The Nation, and the World, 1915–1955,” during her Radcliffe fellowship year. In her book, Gilmore will investigate the struggle against racism, linking what people were thinking about race to what they were doing about race, with particular emphasis on civil rights activists such as Pauli Murray. Her research for The Second Civil War was supported by the Archie K. Davis Award given by the North Caroliniana Society.

Her book Gender and Jim Crow: Women and the Politics of White Supremacy in North Carolina 1896–1920 (University of North Carolina Press, 1996) received a number of honors after its publication, including the Julia Cherry Spruill Prize for the Best Book in Southern Women’s History awarded by the Southern Association of Women Historians in 1997, the Frederick Jackson Turner Award presented by the Organization of American Historians for an author’s first book in American history, and the James A. Rawley Prize given by the Organization of American Historians for a book dealing with the history of race relations in the United States. She earned her PhD from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is a 1999 Guggenheim Fellow.

This information is accurate as of the fellowship year indicated for each fellow.
Photo by Tony Rinaldo